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I can't describe how much help this forum has been. I am an experienced dog owner/trainer, having raised 2 Dobermans, a Weimaraner, poodle and chihuahua. Grew up with Corgis and Goldens. I have my first Vizsla pup, who is a male age 12 weeks. This puppy is BY FAR the most difficult dog I have ever had! My husband and I thought he had serious aggression issues until we read about the "sharkies" on this forum. And if I hadn't read the advice to crate him at 1-2 hour intervals during the day for rest, we'd have already given up. We have a routine now, and when the sharkies hit in the evening, into the crate we go. We're managing. He's a smart little guy and loving, and we love him.

My main question is this: I have a 22 lb poodle, and a 5 lb chihuahua. The poodle put the pup in his place right away, and he is respected by the puppy. However, the puppy is obsessed with my chihuahua. Very quickly we concluded they cannot be loose at the same time. If he's in his crate, she has freedom. If he's out of his crate, she has to be put somewhere safe. If not, he bats at her, mounts her, bites her, etc. I asked the breeder if there's hope he will ever not be fixated on her, and she said yes, but not until he's much older and doesn't view her as a littermate.

Can someone reassure me that advice is true? I'm willing to wait it out, but it's exhausting rotating them for her protection. My Dobermans were extremely gentle with the chihuahua. Did anyone else have a toy dog when they got their V? Did it ever get better?
 

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I haven't gone through that exactly. When my dog was a puppy there was a 25lb dachshund mix and two cats in the house and my dog was more responsive to corrections than it sounds like your boy is. Still, she learned to give all of them their space. My neighbors have a couple chihuahuas, including a rescue that was poorly socialized before they adopted him. He occasionally runs up to our fence to bark at Scout and once ran into my yard when I'd left the gate open. And while it was somewhat comical to see my 55lb dog walking backwards trying to escape the fiery little 5 pounder, I eventually just picked her up and carried her inside. My neighbors have since made a lot of progress with him.

So in my mind chihuahuas are the quintessential small dog that don't know they're small and unless yours is particularly meek for the breed or a senior I'd expect her to eventually correct your demon of a puppy. Are you familiar with the concept of the puppy license? If not, it's a term that describes the time period where adult dogs will be lenient towards puppies as they figure out appropriate social behavior. Here's an article that goes into more detail: What Is a Puppy License? . It wouldn't surprise me if that was factoring into the situation right now. In your position I'd continue to separate them–it should improve with time–but I would also start doing a couple short training sessions every day to help him along. Keep your V on a leash and have your C in the same room. If he runs to the end of the leash trying to get at your other dog, try to redirect him back to you with interesting noises and toys and then give him a treat as soon as he responds. I'm sure with your experience you can adapt as necessary.

Lastly, while walking a vizsla puppy at this age may very well be it's own circle in Dante's Inferno, it might be worthwhile for you and your husband to walk them all together. He can walk the two smaller dogs while you handle the V. Stay far enough away that he can't touch the other dogs, but just go in the same direction for awhile.
 

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I'm sure your puppy just wants to play, but without your tiny chihuahua setting boundaries, I understand your concern.
I would just do small controlled intros, in hopes it will improve.
And like said Einspanner mentioned walks are one of the ways you can do this.
You might consider growling yourself, if your Chihuahua doesn't do it at the proper time.
 
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I haven't gone through that exactly. When my dog was a puppy there was a 25lb dachshund mix and two cats in the house and my dog was more responsive to corrections than it sounds like your boy is. Still, she learned to give all of them their space. My neighbors have a couple chihuahuas, including a rescue that was poorly socialized before they adopted him. He occasionally runs up to our fence to bark at Scout and once ran into my yard when I'd left the gate open. And while it was somewhat comical to see my 55lb dog walking backwards trying to escape the fiery little 5 pounder, I eventually just picked her up and carried her inside. My neighbors have since made a lot of progress with him.

So in my mind chihuahuas are the quintessential small dog that don't know they're small and unless yours is particularly meek for the breed or a senior I'd expect her to eventually correct your demon of a puppy. Are you familiar with the concept of the puppy license? If not, it's a term that describes the time period where adult dogs will be lenient towards puppies as they figure out appropriate social behavior. Here's an article that goes into more detail: What Is a Puppy License? . It wouldn't surprise me if that was factoring into the situation right now. In your position I'd continue to separate them–it should improve with time–but I would also start doing a couple short training sessions every day to help him along. Keep your V on a leash and have your C in the same room. If he runs to the end of the leash trying to get at your other dog, try to redirect him back to you with interesting noises and toys and then give him a treat as soon as he responds. I'm sure with your experience you can adapt as necessary.

Lastly, while walking a vizsla puppy at this age may very well be it's own circle in Dante's Inferno, it might be worthwhile for you and your husband to walk them all together. He can walk the two smaller dogs while you handle the V. Stay far enough away that he can't touch the other dogs, but just go in the same direction for awhile.
Thanks. Unfortunately she growls but refuses to snap at him at all. She won’t attempt to correct him. Those are good ideas and we’ve had the same ones- short controlled exposure and walks. I don’t see an improvement yet. I fear if this is not going to ever improve that I’ll end up having to rehome the V as his testosterone rises. We’ll keep at it.
 

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Males stay in that sweet, goofy clown stage for a long time. I wouldn't be concerned with testosterone.
It's always been my females that rule the roost. Mainly because the males let them.
 
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harrigab

That's a great photo!!!
 
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