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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I am a very active runner and outdoor enthusiast and I am looking to possibly get a new dog. After some research, the Vizsla keeps coming to the top of the list. It seems to have the perfect balance of an active dog but also a playful companion at home. I live in a townhome but have an enormous park down the street, and I live 1 mile from a national park with all kinds of trails. Many neighbors also walk their dogs in both parks.

However, I have concerns about the dog not being around other people or other dogs, and separation anxiety. I work 5 minutes from my office, so I can easily come home everyday to take the dog out and visit.

Should I worry ? Is it better to get a puppy or older dog?

Any help is appreciated.
 

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Living in a townhome which I assume has no yard to speak of, a Vizsla may not be the best option..... :) They do like to have exercise and mental stimulation and even walking in the morning, at lunchtime and of an evening, the dog may b=still become bored while you are at work. You may find a bored dog, left inside a townhome could become destructive through. My Vizsla is OK inside by himself, but his housemate, a GSP, she will destroy a lounge suite in 5 minutes flat given the chance. :)

Also, if you are on your own, having a puppy is going to require some major compromises in terms of being around and where the puppy stays while you are at work. Crating is an option, but I think long term this is cruel.

I think a Vizsla needs space to run, chase birds, lay in the sun, chase butterflies and sleep, meaning a backyard coupled with a three walk regime. :)
 

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http://redbirddog.blogspot.com/2011/05/vizsla-right-dog-for-you.html

Maybe take the survey that is part of the above post. If you are not committed because of other aspects of your life that are more important than your Vizsla, then wait. It took us until our daughters were married and through college before we were ready for a Vizsla.

Vizslas are not dogs. They are lifestyles. Don't get one unless you can make them one of the most important parts of your life.

Good luck but be realistic. They ARE HIGH Powered hunting dogs.

Rod aka redbirddog
 

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Go for it!
Use this forum/read books to get advice on training and raising the pup.
I thought years ago the Viszla is too much and went for a GS dog. I now think the Viszla is easier to train than the GS dogs.
No need to over exercise the dog or you will end up with an Arnold Viszla who needs more and more.
Crate the dog. This is necessary. If you don't it will find a space in your house that will serve as a den and I guarantee you won't like the result.
 

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I agree with datacan. Crating is essential, and our dog prefers being locked up in her crate when we're out than to have the whole place to herself. That would only make her nervous. Also, it doesn't harm any dog to spend 2-4 hours at the time in a crate, and even though Vizslas are very social and special dogs, they are still dogs. :) When they are puppies though, they should not spend much time on their own for the first couple of weeks at least.

We live in a flat and it has worked just fine! We have a big patio/balcony though which Ebba can use for a bit of sunbathing and chasing moths! lol. If you give your dog enough exercise a day though he should be content and happy with being indoors chewing on a toy. And as datacan said, DON'T overexercise them! They need to get used to just doing nothing every now and then, just like energetic kids.

If you think it's the breed for you then go for it! If you don't live on the first floor house breaking your puppy might take a lot of time and get a bit difficult, but not impossible.

Good luck!
 

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You have a lot to offer a V. Many people have Vs who live in big cities, apartments etc. It can work; however, you will have to make it work. Being able to come home during the day from work is great, especially if you are getting a pup! More than once will be needed until your pup is older. Crating will be important, so make sure you will have time to take off from work, initially, to get the pup acclimated and use to his/her new place. In other words, getting a pup on Friday, and going back to work on Mon is not going to cut it, IMO. Take some vacation time, and get your pup use to his crate & begin a solid house training schedule. This can be a process for some pups, but being in a townhome, having a dog who barks or howls while away can become a problem. You need to anticipate this scenario so you are prepared & train from day1. You will need to make opportunities happen for your pup/dog to be socialized around other dogs & kids. Seek them out, enroll in a puppy class, visit playgrounds etc. Your pup will not be ready to run on leash until the age of 15-18 months. They need to mature to avoid damage to their joints & growth plates. Off-leash running is great, because they control the pace & it's usually in a field, park, or trail. It takes a lot of time to train a pup with recall & make it safe to run off-leash in an environment that is not totally contained/controlled. Read threads on dog parks, because they can have problems-especially for an impressionable pup. Vs are soft dogs. Last but not least, as a bachelor, you have to consider how your V will effect your social life. Vs need to be stimulated & around people. You can not go to work all day on a Friday, come home spend an hour with the pup, and then expect to go on a date, bars, or whatever, and be gone all night too. That is not healthy for any pup, but is not suitable for the Vs personality. You will need to devote most of your weekend time to your V--pup or older V. As redbirddog stated, Vs are a lifestyle. I have had many dogs in my life, purebred & rescues, and I find the V to require the most effort. They are fabulous dogs, but they command a lot to be healthy & balanced. Good Luck on your decision!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone for the great insight.

Are there other breeds that you would recommend as a better fit for my lifestyle other than the Vizsla (although I am in love with them)? e.g. dogs that are active and can run, but might not be a "lifestyle".

Thanks
Nick
 

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I really like what Rod said about how “They are not dogs. They are lifestyles. Don't get one unless you can make them one of the most important parts of your life." Although I may not always be thrilled about our runs or walks in the 100+ degree heat however at the end of the day you have to do what you have to do to make them happy and healthy. We have had to rearrange schedules, finances and personal preferences to accommodate his needs and we were happy to do so. We live in a residential area with a small backyard but have found that with plenty of exercise, love and attention our V has been the perfect addition to our small family.
 

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Hi nick, i just thaught i'd reply to your post as im the same boat as you! I live on my own and was having the exact same thaughts as you before i got Brodi, you can have a vizsla in your life if you're a batchelor, but like it's been mentioned in previous posts you have to adapt and make your V the most important thing in your life!

Brodi is 14 1/2 weeks old now and he currently gets a 40 min off leash walk/run in the morning then my friend or family member will walk him at lunch time and spend at least an hour with him, i am then home from work at 4pm and he is straight out either to the beach,fields or woods for more off leash walk/run. Where i live in Cumbria Uk i am lucky as spoilt for choice for places to take Brodi for walks and new experiences, i am also a keen outdoor enthusiast like yourself and plan on taking Brodi mountain biking with me when he is 15-18 months old so he will have a great lifestyle with plenty of exercise!

What i will say is crate training will be the best thing you can ever do, i took 3 weeks off work to get Brodi settled in and used to my routine and he now loves his crate and is coming on so much, each week you notice huge changes in them both mentally and physically it's the most rewarding thing i have ever done and wouldn't be without Brodi now! You can do it you just need to be 100% commited, good luck with your descision!

Regards Matt.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Matt, that is encouraging to see someone like minded like myself and worked this dog into your lifestyle. I'm sure I will have more questions as I continue my research and exploration of getting the dog.

Thanks for your help.
nick
 

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I'll kept it short. If you are committed, seriously committed to having a dog as you best buddy; do it. If not, don't torture the dog and keep him locked up in the house. :( Allot of sacrifice will be required on your part.
 

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It also helps if you can afford a daycare or playgroup at least part time, particularly one with a big enough area for rambunctious play and romping.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have thought about that and definitely would do it. How much daycare would you suggest? 1x per week, less often, more often?
 
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