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My V is 11 months old and knows his commands. However his "come"/recall command goes out the window as soon as I take him off leash to play outdoors. It drives me up the wall!! After many times that he has done this and put himself in danger (cars, other dogs) I have decided to put a remote collar on him. Any advice on training with a remote collar? Any resources?
 

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i would start with a long lead. call him with some high motivators (favorite treat or toy) and if he does not come, give him a tug. once at you, reward. dogs don`t generalize their knowledge about commands, we need to help them, so just because he knew come in your house it does not make him to do the same outdoors, especially with all those exciting distractions. i would not do any e-collar until you have bought him the recall command in different outdoor scenarios successfully.
 

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Someone once explained the following to me, and it stuck with me:

Recalling your dog could be close to punishment as you take away their freedom. It's no fun to be called back and know fun time is over. It's given as an example as an unconscious 'negative correction'.

What you could do instead:
  • Often recall and let your dog loose again, so your dog learns the fun doesn't always end. You can do this on hikes or just in the field.
  • Always treat with a high motivator
  • Continue to enforce around the house with favorite treat or toys
 

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I use a 5 meters long leash when I need to have complete control, i.e. there is a road nearby or there are children, runners or bicycles around. For me, more than five meters is not manageable.
Ada has quite a good recall, she is 7 and a half months old now. What has worked for us is in line with what Frida and Gabica said:
During our walks since the beginning we make a party/fuss every time she checked on us, look at us or run to us. We also use small pieces of food as an incentive, mainly sausages. We call her, treat her and then let her go again much more times than we put her on a leash.
 

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There are many, many, training programs for dogs utilizing an eCollar. A lot is dependent on what you are trying to achieve. There are hundreds of YouTube videos, and training videos on DVD and Streamed format for the owner.
In it's "basic form" it looks like this for recalling a dog.
1.)The eCollar and check cord are attached at the same time.
2.) A "known" command is given. In other words, you have to be confident that the dog knows the command you are giving.
at the moment the command is given, a slight tug on the checkcord id performed, while simultaneously using the eCollar. Hereis where there are differing philosophies. Some people will use the "Tone" only in the beginning. Some will use "Tone and Vibrate", and some will apply a very low level stimulation. The lowest level required to indicate a response. None are wrong. The key element is that the dog is given a known command, and the association between the checkcord and the eCollar is being established. It's just a quick press of the button(s).
3.) The moment the dog begins to respond to the command, all "pressure" is removed from the scenario.( Pressure is the use of the check cord, or eCollar.). The dog is then positively encouraged to come to the handler. Get on your knees and call keep calling them into you. When they get there, make a big fuss over them. If they get distracted, gently apply pressure again with the eCollar, and checkcord as before.
The goal here is to replace the check cord with the eCollar, and "extend the leash", but it takes time. You are conditioning the dog to understand that you can and will enforce a command at any distance, BUT! you want the dog to come to you because you have convinced it that you are more interesting and fun, than what they are doing. Willing is better than forced.
Eventually you will reach a point where the dog is dragging the check cord behind them and responding solely to the voice command, backed up with the eCollar. This phase may last some months. The check cord is your safety device during this period. Finn, my dog, has a 50' checkcord attached to him lately, as he was blowing off the eCollar. A separate issue.

Now then, at 11 months old, he's feeling himself. He's bigger, stronger, bolder, more confident, and is ready to find his own limits and see what he can do. It's a dog thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There are many, many, training programs for dogs utilizing an eCollar. A lot is dependent on what you are trying to achieve. There are hundreds of YouTube videos, and training videos on DVD and Streamed format for the owner.
In it's "basic form" it looks like this for recalling a dog.
1.)The eCollar and check cord are attached at the same time.
2.) A "known" command is given. In other words, you have to be confident that the dog knows the command you are giving.
at the moment the command is given, a slight tug on the checkcord id performed, while simultaneously using the eCollar. Hereis where there are differing philosophies. Some people will use the "Tone" only in the beginning. Some will use "Tone and Vibrate", and some will apply a very low level stimulation. The lowest level required to indicate a response. None are wrong. The key element is that the dog is given a known command, and the association between the checkcord and the eCollar is being established. It's just a quick press of the button(s).
3.) The moment the dog begins to respond to the command, all "pressure" is removed from the scenario.( Pressure is the use of the check cord, or eCollar.). The dog is then positively encouraged to come to the handler. Get on your knees and call keep calling them into you. When they get there, make a big fuss over them. If they get distracted, gently apply pressure again with the eCollar, and checkcord as before.
The goal here is to replace the check cord with the eCollar, and "extend the leash", but it takes time. You are conditioning the dog to understand that you can and will enforce a command at any distance, BUT! you want the dog to come to you because you have convinced it that you are more interesting and fun, than what they are doing. Willing is better than forced.
Eventually you will reach a point where the dog is dragging the check cord behind them and responding solely to the voice command, backed up with the eCollar. This phase may last some months. The check cord is your safety device during this period. Finn, my dog, has a 50' checkcord attached to him lately, as he was blowing off the eCollar. A separate issue.

Now then, at 11 months old, he's feeling himself. He's bigger, stronger, bolder, more confident, and is ready to find his own limits and see what he can do. It's a dog thing.
There are many, many, training programs for dogs utilizing an eCollar. A lot is dependent on what you are trying to achieve. There are hundreds of YouTube videos, and training videos on DVD and Streamed format for the owner.
In it's "basic form" it looks like this for recalling a dog.
1.)The eCollar and check cord are attached at the same time.
2.) A "known" command is given. In other words, you have to be confident that the dog knows the command you are giving.
at the moment the command is given, a slight tug on the checkcord id performed, while simultaneously using the eCollar. Hereis where there are differing philosophies. Some people will use the "Tone" only in the beginning. Some will use "Tone and Vibrate", and some will apply a very low level stimulation. The lowest level required to indicate a response. None are wrong. The key element is that the dog is given a known command, and the association between the checkcord and the eCollar is being established. It's just a quick press of the button(s).
3.) The moment the dog begins to respond to the command, all "pressure" is removed from the scenario.( Pressure is the use of the check cord, or eCollar.). The dog is then positively encouraged to come to the handler. Get on your knees and call keep calling them into you. When they get there, make a big fuss over them. If they get distracted, gently apply pressure again with the eCollar, and checkcord as before.
The goal here is to replace the check cord with the eCollar, and "extend the leash", but it takes time. You are conditioning the dog to understand that you can and will enforce a command at any distance, BUT! you want the dog to come to you because you have convinced it that you are more interesting and fun, than what they are doing. Willing is better than forced.
Eventually you will reach a point where the dog is dragging the check cord behind them and responding solely to the voice command, backed up with the eCollar. This phase may last some months. The check cord is your safety device during this period. Finn, my dog, has a 50' checkcord attached to him lately, as he was blowing off the eCollar. A separate issue.

Now then, at 11 months old, he's feeling himself. He's bigger, stronger, bolder, more confident, and is ready to find his own limits and see what he can do. It's a dog thing.
Thanks gunnr, appreciate the response. If I am in a fenced in area do I really need the checkcord?
 

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In the beginning, yes you do.
There are multiple things happening here, and I am assuming that your end goal is to have the dog off a leash, or cord, and on the eCollar.
At this point your pup has been working on the leash, or even a longer check cord. So it has learned that a physical stimuli, will follow a verbal command, followed by praise. This is an important cycle to a dog. The more that they can predict their environment, the more at ease they are, and the quicker they progress.
Your pup has also learned a dirty trick. He knows that you cannot enforce the recall command, so he is being a jerk. This is another reason to go back on the check cord, or leash. You want to reestablish the connection to him that you can, and will, enforce the command at any distance.
What you are seeking to do now is to reorient the dog that the physical stimuli can now assume two forms. The cord, or the collar. It's very unfair to make the dog learn a whole new system at this point, and much easier to bridge that transition by using both simultaneously. Eventually you will leave the backyard and all of this will happen in a wide open area. The more the dog can predict the patterns, the better off you are
Don't feel as if you taking a step backward, or are in some form of a remediation phase. Thousands, and thousands, of hunting dogs are trained in fenced backyards, basements, living rooms, garages, barns, etc. with both collar and leash every day. Even on the training table, which is only 2'x8', the collar and cord are used in concert.
The fenced backyard is actually an ideal environment. No matter what happens, your pup is safe. If you get frustrated, you can just kind of drop the cord, walk away, get your composure and resume, in a safe environment.
The way that folks evaluate the dogs response to recall as a percentage can lead a person down a very uncertain path. A dog is either 100% responsive to the recall, or it is not. There is no 50%, 60%, 75%. It's all or none. I understand what they mean, but at the end of the day,,,,,,,
Male V's can be little jerks at the year to year and half age. They are going to test you. That nice obedient little puppy suddenly becomes this disobedient little miscreant that you want to strangle, but you don't. Finn, my male at 15 months, and I, are going through what you are experiencing with your dog. I have gone through this with every male I have had. It's natural. It's going to happen, and you're going to get past it. It just takes consistency, repetition, and maybe a little firmer hand.
 
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In the beginning, yes you do.
There are multiple things happening here, and I am assuming that your end goal is to have the dog off a leash, or cord, and on the eCollar.
At this point your pup has been working on the leash, or even a longer check cord. So it has learned that a physical stimuli, will follow a verbal command, followed by praise. This is an important cycle to a dog. The more that they can predict their environment, the more at ease they are, and the quicker they progress.
Your pup has also learned a dirty trick. He knows that you cannot enforce the recall command, so he is being a jerk. This is another reason to go back on the check cord, or leash. You want to reestablish the connection to him that you can, and will, enforce the command at any distance.
What you are seeking to do now is to reorient the dog that the physical stimuli can now assume two forms. The cord, or the collar. It's very unfair to make the dog learn a whole new system at this point, and much easier to bridge that transition by using both simultaneously. Eventually you will leave the backyard and all of this will happen in a wide open area. The more the dog can predict the patterns, the better off you are
Don't feel as if you taking a step backward, or are in some form of a remediation phase. Thousands, and thousands, of hunting dogs are trained in fenced backyards, basements, living rooms, garages, barns, etc. with both collar and leash every day. Even on the training table, which is only 2'x8', the collar and cord are used in concert.
The fenced backyard is actually an ideal environment. No matter what happens, your pup is safe. If you get frustrated, you can just kind of drop the cord, walk away, get your composure and resume, in a safe environment.
The way that folks evaluate the dogs response to recall as a percentage can lead a person down a very uncertain path. A dog is either 100% responsive to the recall, or it is not. There is no 50%, 60%, 75%. It's all or none. I understand what they mean, but at the end of the day,,,,,,,
Male V's can be little jerks at the year to year and half age. They are going to test you. That nice obedient little puppy suddenly becomes this disobedient little miscreant that you want to strangle, but you don't. Finn, my male at 15 months, and I, are going through what you are experiencing with your dog. I have gone through this with every male I have had. It's natural. It's going to happen, and you're going to get past it. It just takes consistency, repetition, and maybe a little firmer hand.
Thanks again, you've summed up exactly where I am with Jackson at the moment: a testy miscreant. If I had Inspector Gadget arms, strangling from a distance would've been an option! Thx again.
 
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