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We have a 16 week old dog who is generally great. He walks most of the time off the lead and tends to keep within 10 metres or so of us. Very sweet actually, he often waits and then runs ahead and then waits and continues this :).

Anyway, he's not great at coming back to you when you call him, even if you've got a treat in your hand. He very much takes it or leaves it. Just wondering how we can work on this?

Ta

Dave
 

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My V is now 8 months old and I have walked her almost every morning since I got her at 8 weeks. Most of the walking was done on a short lead and then I moved her onto a 6m tracking lead. They don't have very long attention spans until they get to 6 months so you have to be careful not to frustrate them too much by repeating the same command while trying to teach them it. I worked on sit, wait, stay and come in different ways and different places all the time. They have a will of their own so it is difficult to have total control ALL the time. I have real difficulty recalling mine when she is playing with another dog like on the beach.

What I have really worked on is say she is at heel or nearby (what I would call FRONT or working) is if she sees something she wants to chase like a bird and it is on the other side of the road then I need to be able to stop her in her tracks. So when I was doing all this walking I am also using No and LEAVE IT (for smelling other dog doo also called perving). By using these two commands with different levels of emotion you can stop the dog and then follow it up immediately with a really friendly COME. I find the further away she gets before I can issue the NO command the less likely she is to obey it.

It takes lots of perserverence. But after all the walking you really get to know the dog (and vice versa probably). When it all comes together it is very rewarding.
 

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I could write lots about this but to keep it short I suggest you try reading 'The Other End of the Leash' by Patricia McConnell (or any of her other training books). Excellent resource for those wanting to employ positive, reward-based training - both our Vizslas have been trained this way and I believe it's a terrific way to train any dog.
 

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Put the dog on a long training lead, and let it walk while dragging the lead, give the lead a short quick tug when you say here/come and turn your body so that it is facing slightly away from the dog. The first couple times you may need to pull the dog into you, but soon he'll start to understand the program. Eventually you should be able to get him to start coming without giving a tug on the long lead (20ft). The come command is the most important command to teach a dog.

The Delmar Smith Method for training points has some good ideas on this as well, you can usually pick it up for about $8 used on Amazon.

Chris
 
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