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We have a beautiful, loving 8 year old vizsla that might need a new home in Virginia. She does great with other dogs and cats, but not kids.

She's decently trained, healthy, and has a sweet disposition - and is actually very calm for a vizsla! We have 2 kids, and while the older one did great with our dog and Maple loved her, our second child has been different. The baby is much more active and clumsy and is starting to aggravate Maple. I don't want to run the risk of Maple or the baby getting hurt, and they are not a great combination as Maple ages.

We've spoken to a few trainers that have told us that training may help, but to strongly consider rehoming to avoid risk altogether. It's a heartbreaking decision, but we'd consider it if we find the right home for Maple.

If anyone has advice or is interested, let me know.
 

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Have you spoken to your area Vizsla rescue? They have more experience vetting prospective adopters, than most owners.
I am so very sorry your family is having to make this difficult decision.
 

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Have you spoken to your area Vizsla rescue? The have more experience vetting prospective adopters, than most owners.
I am so very sorry your family is having to make this difficult decision.
Thank you! I haven't looked there yet. Will do so.
 

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When my kids were born our black lab (incredibly sweet ~4yo female) suddenly decided when they were crawling or pursuing her that she couldn’t tolerate being poked and pinched by a toddler. She tagged my daughter‘s forehead causing a minuscule scar (drawing blood) once. Faced with the same decision you are I decided to see if I could make the 4yo lab bitch understand. She had the same passive disposition as my current V (but a bit smarter) so I worked to make her understand that ANY aggression with the child was not allowed. It involved scolding/punishment if she even curled her lips back in warning or hint of growl.

Yes, it wasn’t fair because she was simply using her doggie language to warn the toddler to stay away, but it couldn’t be allowed. As I recall it took about 1-2 weeks of conditioning (serious scolding) to help her understand she needed to avoid, run, whatever it took to NOT show any aggression to the toddler. The message was that she was no longer the Alpha to the kids (they were the Alphas instead through me) and aggression was never allowed under any circumstances. I don’t know if it’s a good or orthodox method but it worked and she got it completely in 1-2 weeks.

Kids and the dog reached equilibrium and there was never another incident in my house (dog died happily with our family at the age of 14), but still, it is never a good idea to leave young children unattended with dogs (or anywhere obviously - I was in the room when the bite occurred but as the dog was so passive with adults we hadn’t imagined she could do it). Still, I do think dogs with a basically passive disposition (like a V IMO) can be conditioned to not show aggression to children or others in household; I’ve done that with at least 2 of my dogs (including my current German Shepard who was much harder) and wouldn’t hesitate to try to “train” those behaviours out of my current Vizsla if necessary. Good luck whatever you decide to do. It’s sad as rehoming the dog will probably be hard on an 8yo but you have to go with what you can handle. (y)
 
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