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Hi, we have just brought home our first Viszla puppy 4 days ago. She is lovely, patient and eager to learn but she displays very worrying barrier aggressive behaviour. When you stop her doing something she really wants to do she will growl, snap, air bite and wriggle.
Like I said, she is mostly patient, even with my younger children who do pick her up, but just displays this aggressive behaviour when prevented from doing her goal, either if you pick her up mid wee or try to stop her bite play to hard. I am really concerned and at a loss as to what to do. Do I give time out in a specific place? Has anyone else experienced this?
 

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It's normal for them to do this, if they are in the middle of a bitey game.
As far as mid wee. I'm guessing this is when she is choosing the wrong place to wee.
If you are using a loud voice to correct her, and snatching her up quickly, to make a mad rush outside. I would slow things down a bit, and use your normal voice.
Away from those two things, start practicing with her. When one of my pups try to wiggle away. I hold them close to me. As soon as they relax, I set them free. After a few practice sessions, she should get the idea.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's normal for them to do this, if they are in the middle of a bitey game.
As far as mid wee. I'm guessing this is when she is choosing the wrong place to wee.
If you are using a loud voice to correct her, and snatching her up quickly, to make a mad rush outside. I would slow things down a bit, and use your normal voice.
Away from those two things, start practicing with her. When one of my pups try to wiggle away. I hold them close to me. As soon as they relax, I set them free. After a few practice sessions, she should get the idea.
I tried hugging and soothing her one time, it just made it so much worse. She has now really gone for my 3 year old in an aggressive way when he picked her up. She normally lets him or any of us when she is not in hyperactivity but it is getting worse and more frequent. We don’t ever shout at her or punish her but we have to try something now, which we are trying instant time out. Going to try talking to her before we pick her up in a over calm way to see if that helps too. Just feel like we must be doing something wrong with them getting more frequent.
 

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can you provide a bit more background about how your vizsla puppy is being raised, trained, routine etc. a lot of times the issue is not that one reaction you see but things add up from lack of structure and routine, not sufficient sleep, no crate training etc.
 

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I wouldn't let a 3 year old pick up a puppy.
They are just not able to pick up correctly, and provide the correct support.
 
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It's not going to be easy with a 3 year old and I also agree a small child should not be picking the puppy up. Play interactions with the puppy should be closely monitored and guided. It was very challenging for us getting past the sharkie phase even with my 8 year old child. My daughter didn't want to even be near Ellie for fear of sharkies. It took a family intervention of sorts for everyone to get on the same page on how to handle and interact with the pup in a proper and consistent way.

Whenever sharkie mode activated, we would first try redirection (we had toys everywhere, and everywhere we went we had toys at the ready to redirect). If that didn't work we would get up and walk away ignoring the behavior. The last option was kennel time if all else failed.
 

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She's probably not getting enough sleep or mental stimulation (check this out A thing that changed everything for Aron and me...). Biting is normal for puppies and vizlas are a very mouthy breed. Redirect with a toy or a chew. Do lots of mat training in the moments where treat or a toy doesn't help. Stop picking her up or teach her that picking her up means good things are coming (
).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
can you provide a bit more background about how your vizsla puppy is being raised, trained, routine etc. a lot of times the issue is not that one reaction you see but things add up from lack of structure and routine, not sufficient sleep, no crate training etc.
She is just learning her routine yet and isn’t 100% established but only had her a few days. She sleeps in her crate at night but would definitely prefer to sleep with you. Her toilet training is going well. She is awake for around an hour then has a sleep. Have been wondering if we are too excitable with her and run her emotions high with so many children around, we have 7. She is very tolerant of them and loves to jump on them and kiss them and let them pick her up and doesn’t run away but just when she gets too hyper and determine on activity she flips, not just puppy biting or growling. She doesn’t like her food, even the one we got from the breeder but loves her treats of chicken and carrot or other meat and some veg. Going to try calming our play down with her. Talking calming when praising her and giving her more rest play too. Don’t know weather to change her food because if people are hungry they get cross quick too?
She's probably not getting enough sleep or mental stimulation (check this out A thing that changed everything for Aron and me...). Biting is normal for puppies and vizlas are a very mouthy breed. Redirect with a toy or a chew. Do lots of mat training in the moments where treat or a toy doesn't help. Stop picking her up or teach her that picking her up means good things are coming (
).
She's probably not getting enough sleep or mental stimulation (check this out A thing that changed everything for Aron and me...). Biting is normal for puppies and vizlas are a very mouthy breed. Redirect with a toy or a chew. Do lots of mat training in the moments where treat or a toy doesn't help. Stop picking her up or teach her that picking her up means good things are coming (
).
It's not going to be easy with a 3 year old and I also agree a small child should not be picking the puppy up. Play interactions with the puppy should be closely monitored and guided. It was very challenging for us getting past the sharkie phase even with my 8 year old child. My daughter didn't want to even be near Ellie for fear of sharkies. It took a family intervention of sorts for everyone to get on the same page on how to handle and interact with the pup in a proper and consistent way.

Whenever sharkie mode activated, we would first try redirection (we had toys everywhere, and everywhere we went we had toys at the ready to redirect). If that didn't work we would get up and walk away ignoring the behavior. The last option was kennel time if all else failed.
We use redirection when she chews something she shouldn’t and that seems to work well, but think you are right, going to continue with time out, try constructive play and calm tones ( not over excited) with ‘free’ play. She gets her meals in her snuffle mat as this seems to keep her interest longer than eating out of a bowl. We have played hide and seek with treats for her but think that is going to take a few more attempts to perfect.
It seems like attack of the sharkies is something a lot have people have experienced with their V and is hopefully something they grow out of with patience, training, love and exercise planning.
Thanks everyone. Will post update on how she is getting on.
 
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