Hungarian Vizsla Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Our 14yr old male has pretty severe,, but managed, arthritis & isn't as active as he once was; although he still has bursts of puppy energy from time to time. Despite being on a grain-free kibble that is supplemented with some wet food, vitamins & also pumpkin, squash, salmon, veggies, fruit, etc.- he has gained weight. He's currently at 66lbs. The vet isn't concerned but we both agree he would feel better if he shed some weight. My issue is, he is CONSTANTLY begging for more grub! He's at our feet when we eat crying; at the treat counter crying or locking his bowl & crying. This is behavior that has developed as he's gotten older- he was a perfectly trained gentleman in his younger days. A lot of times I give in because I don't know if he's truly hungry, but that means he's sometimes eating 3 meals a day instead of 2. Im just wondering, would it be better to give 3 smaller meals instead of 2 bigger ones? Maybe he needs the steady glucose support through the day?!? Advice??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,639 Posts
I suppose it's your question about blood glucose that's leading me down this train of thought, but a couple years ago one of my parents' cats became diabetic and had gained a lot of weight despite the same level of activity and food. We changed his diet, regularly tested his blood sugar, and gave insulin, but he essentially turned into a wild animal around food, being so brazen as to steal it from our hands. Even when his blood sugar leveled out to where he didn't need insulin and the diabetes was essentially in remission, that wild behavior and constant fixation on food stayed. I have no idea if diabetes in dogs presents in a similar way, but it may be something to bring up with your vet.

Once you're able to rule out any medical causes, I'd be curious to see if giving him some water flavored with some broth or something similar throughout the day could help his tummy feel full without adding too many calories. He might not fall for that trick though. :) And while dogs are obviously not human, from personal experience I've had the most success losing weight and feel satiated longer on a slightly higher fat diet. So looking at what he's eating, I'd maybe try swapping out some of the fruit or squash for olive, coconut, or salmon oil or even a not super lean protein like chicken thighs or sardines.

Hope you figure it out! I know how that crying can wear away at our hearts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
Three smaller meals are better than two large if it helps him. At 14 years old he's earned a little slack, as long as he's not getting fat,and 66lbs. is not fat. Maybe heavy, depending on his frame size, but not fat.
When my boys and girls got older I used to add Cosequine, and Hyalun, to their food. This with a little Metacam from time to time, seemed to make things easier for them. Cosequine and Hyalun are purchased through horse catalogs, tack shops, and suppliers, if you want to try them.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,323 Posts
I think seniors just get more bossy, set in their ways as they get older. Plus the fact that we give into them more. At their age, we just want to make them happy for as long as possible.
I always keep fresh steamed green beans, and carrots for my senior. Plus I found a very low calorie treat, at a Veterinary dermatologist. That way June can have a treat whatever she wants one, and not put on weight. I also add green beans to her meals, so she feels full with less calorie intake.

She started taking galliprant a year ago.
It's helped her to be more active, and has less side effects than the other NSAIDs.
The draw back is the cost. It's $80 something a month.
She also takes Movoflex, YuMove, and likes fish oil with her evening meals.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top