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Per my earlier post I am getting my Vizsla on Saturday. We live on 6 acres where we also have chickens that roam free. Any advice on making the chicken/dog introduction. Also, do you think that bird training will be dampered if the dog is around Chickens that its not spposed to harm?
 

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Newdog,

Don't recall if you are getting a new very young pup or adult Vizsla. I used to train up in the country with my first trainer. ON the property he had chickens. We used a training collar on Bailey after he had chased the chickens. The trick of a training collar is to get the dog to "believe" that the thing he was chasing shocked him.

We did this with goats, cows, deer and rabbits. Each time when Bailey came back it was "What happened Bailey? Did those chickens shock you?" [/color] and paid him no more mind on the subject.

Cows, goats, chicken, coyotes, deer and rabbits all don't like Bailey and shock him when he chases them.

I can promise you some will disagree with this method. I would be VERY CAREFUL.

Hope that is of some use.

Rod a.k.a. redbirddog
http://redbirddog. blogspot.com
 

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I don't disagree with Rod's method, but please heed his caution! If you have no V &/or e-collar experience, then I would defer to an experienced trainer or choose another method. It is very easy to crush a V with an e-collar in the wrong hands (even with the best intentions)!
 

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Keep the dog away from the chickens at first. I'd say after he settles in and adopts you guys as his family, work on building confidence daily. Vizsla's can be skiddish and wimpy as my son would say; if they are not confident in their surroundings. After a month or so; when you see a solid foundation in his responce to standard obedience commands, you can work on the chicken control. I don't know of another way to do it without an e-collar. As stated, be very carefull and start on the lowest setting and try to work with someone who has trained gentle dogs with an e-collar. That means...if they only trained a German short hair to hunt on an e-collar; find another trainer because they may fry your dog in one session. :mad:
 

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Do you mean GSPs are tougher or more stubborn than Vs?
I tried my friend's electronic collar collar on Sam and it worked wonderfully at the same setting. My friend owns a 5 year old GSP and it's the only way he can let the dog run freely.
 

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That means...if they only trained a German short hair to hunt on an e-collar; find another trainer because they may fry your dog in one session.
Absolutely Linescreamer! I'd watch some guys last season with their GSPs using the collar during hunting. A Vizsla will fold up and quit if the collar was used that way.

Books are written about the use of the collar.
RBD
 

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datacan said:
Do you mean GSPs are tougher or more stubborn than Vs?
I tried my friend's electronic collar collar on Sam and it worked wonderfully at the same setting. My friend owns a 5 year old GSP and it's the only way he can let the dog run freely.
Yep. Most dogs can take it in stride and handle more current then a V. The other problem is with a Vizsla they have the memory of an Elephant. The next time they smell or see the collar you maybe looking for them under the truck or behind the sofa. :eek: A lab on the other hand will forget about the shock in minutes. These are generalities you understand but, you get the idea. :)
 

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Just wanted to say I've had no problems using an e-collar. I am certainly not an expert, and my experience is limited to one dog, but I'm glad that I took the chance on the e-caller.

I did spend the money to get one that is adjustable (1-100, Dogtra iQ in case you are wondering), and with a vibrate feature. At a level of say 20, most humans can't even feel it. I started Kobi out using it on a setting of 30. The most he has been up to is around 60. 60 will usually make him yelp, depending if he is interacting with a human or another dog. With another dog aorund he can ignore a lot of stimulation. Of course, if I catch him off guard with a 30-40, he'll still sometimes yelp. They're sensitive, but in my case, he hasn't been any worse off for it. He does not fear/fight against the collar being put on, and his recall is now 100x better (without using the collar to recall).

I think if you're very cautious and invest in a GOOD collar, you'll be okay. I would suggest something with at least a 400 yd range (we're talking about a Vizsla, 100 yards only takes 10 seconds), rechargeable battery, and a page/beep/vibrate feature so it has SOME functionality other than just plain shocking the dog. Kobi responds very well to his "pager" (the vibrate feature).

As far as power of the collar, I've had friends "test" it up to 100, but only on their thumb, not their neck. When I hit them at 100 they dropped the collar! I don't think you'll ever want to turn it up that high!
 

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:) I see, under the truck is no place for a dog.
I read somewhere there are 2 kinds of Vs. One is smaller and the other is bigger. Mine is the bigger type. Both parents are from Hungary (5 year gen bloodline thing). Perhaps there is the difference.

I noticed the long memory thing. There is a difference between what he knows and stubborn behavior.

Don't have an e-collar but I think the correction level must match the momentary drive intensity. High drive mode needs higher correction level.

From what I read there is no standard on the shock level. TT has a smaller scale compared to Dogtra, I think. I will look at Sportdog as well but lean toward TT.

Off topic but I tried to see how long it would take for my V to check in with me once off leash. The most it took him was 28 seconds. So if he runs at 100 yards in 10 sec Sam will be 300 yards away in 28 sec. Assuming he keeps running away from me.
 

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not let them loose with Ruby yet!!
 

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Sunny gets so excited whenever she sees me get the e-collar out. She knows it's outside time for her. And we never have used it more than a few times. A buzz works now instead of a shock.

I very reluctantly bought the collar but after every other option had been explored. It's been great for us.
 

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I wanted to bump this because we're going to be getting chickens in the next few months. Riley *just* turned 6 months, so I'm not sure when it would be appropriate to start on the e-collar. I thought for a while that she wasn't too interested in birds... yesterday she swam out into the bay after a bird. 8) Is it dangerous for them to be around the chickens when they are tiny? We will be getting chicks and they will have to be inside under an incubator light to keep them warm. Any advice from those who have experience with Vs and chickens would be appreciated!
 

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I've never tried an e-collar on Ruby, but she comes with me everyday to feed our hens, and she sooooo wants to get in there amongst them,,,for the wrong reasons as far as my hens are concerned :-[
 

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As long as the chicks are in the house keep them in a separate room with the door closed. Mine are around chickens on the weekends and know they are off limits. I still wouldn't trust them with the chickens alone. Ive seen my female point one and I'm sure if it took off she would have considered it flushing. Then it would have been game on. Mine are all ecollar conditioned and know the leave it command. They also had to learn through the ecollar that chickens are bad news. But if they have 25 chickens milling around them in the yard it would still be tempting to them if I was out of sight.

My male had one of the chickens try to eat out of his food bowl with him. He snatched it up with his mouth, turned and set it back down behind him. The chicken took off running and he went back to eating.
 

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My male had one of the chickens try to eat out of his food bowl with him. He snatched it up with his mouth, turned and set it back down behind him. The chicken took off running and he went back to eating.
TexasRed,
What a great visual I got! Bailey had to be conditioned to chickens because the first training we did was up in a farm area. We turned our backs for a minute to talk and the next thing we saw was Bailey heading full tilt for the farmer's(very old Hispanic gentleman) chickens. Chickens flew everywhere as 8 month old Bailey was in bird heaven. I apologized deeply for my dog's poor manners and gave the man $20 for his trouble.

E-collar was ordered that afternoon.

RBD
 

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I bet he had a smile on his face, tongue hanging out and tail wagging.
 

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I know you guys over in the U.S. have this love of E-collars. I will just say this. Here in Oz, very few are sold and very few are ever seen on dogs. Not 1 of the hunters I know have or ever will use an E-collar on there dogs. They believe it's the lazy man's way of training them.

I totally disagree with the use of them. I realise that those who use them believe in them and that is there right to do so. But, I always think of this when I am training a dog. "Would I like that done to me?" If not, then find another way.

I have managed to train my dogs without them so far and will continue to do so. I would rather work for another 6 months getting something right, than use an E-collar and have it sorted in a week.

Note well, even those who use them, who know how to use them well, all offer the same disclaimer whenever they recommend them. Don't do it unless you KNOW what you are doing with an E-collar.

That to me says they are fraught with danger.

Once again, I am not criticising anyone who uses them, I am just not a believer in them. So any time I see a recommendation, I will most likely offer an alternative viewpoint on it.

Some one also commented on them being used on a GSP and that A GSP is a hardier dog than a V in this respect. I own both V's and a GSP. My GSP is very no different to my V's. She is just as effected by harsh commands as the V's are.

Once again, if you choose an E-collar route, please be careful.
 

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How would you recommend training a V to leave chickens alone without the use of an e-collar? Riley is showing more and more that she has a strong prey drive. We have taught her the "leave it" command, but once she's locked onto hunting a small animal all bets are off.
 

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No argument from me on ecollars. Each person has the right to train their dog in a way the see fit. Just because I use them does not make me think everyone has to.
My grandfather raised and trained English pointers and never used an ecollar. His dogs were excellent hunters and had great manners but his way of training would shut a vizsla down. Before I say this and upset everyone he trained many years ago and this was acceptable practices at the time.
To answer your question on killing chickens.
The dog would be whipped with the dead chicken til he was scared to go near them.
The dog won't recall in the field.
The dog was peppered at a distance with bird shot.
 

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To answer your question on killing chickens.
The dog would be whipped with the dead chicken til he was scared to go near them.
The dog won't recall in the field.
The dog was peppered at a distance with bird shot.
And only the pups that showed promise to being excellent hunters lived to see 12 weeks old.

Ah, the good old days. Good things some things do change. ;D

Oh, wait, didn't I say I was a conservative? ???

RBD
 
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