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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. Long time lurker here. Just joined.

Been searching for a while and doing my research on the breed and finally narrowed down few breeders

One breeder I've found (well known on here) has a litter available in 8 weeks.

Looking at the pedigree, looks like the sire and dam share the same sire (half siblings). Does this cause inbreeding issues? or any issues at all? The sire and dam seem well accomplished, have good health records, etc

Thanks in advance for any information.
 

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That is a VERY tight linebreeding.
Normally only done if the grandsire was extraordinary, and they are wanting to replicate (even improve) those traits. It can be great when things go well, but you also stand a higher chance of replicating traits you do not want.

I’ve seen breeders able to successfully do it, and other ones have problems show up.

Your going to get a lot of opinions on this subject, along with what COI is to high.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. The grandsire is very well accomplished. I'm assuming this is why there is this tight linebreeding.

COI for the pups will be 25%, according to the breeder this is where he likes it to be.
 

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Thanks for the reply. The grandsire is very well accomplished. I'm assuming this is why there is this tight linebreeding.

COI for the pups will be 25%, according to the breeder this is where he likes it to be.
I’ve owned a vizsla that had a COI in the lower 30s. She was perfect in every way but for one thing. You could not have asked for a sweeter temperament, or more drive to hunt in a dog. She had sarcoma at 2 years old. It was removed, and they were able to get clean margins. Even so, the vet said someday it would return. I could be wrong, but I’ve always felt the high COI made her more susceptible to cancer. A different dog from the same breeding was lost to cancer at 5.
Before that time, even higher COIs in her bloodlines never had cancer at a young age. So maybe I’m wrong, or maybe the tight linebreeding brought it light. It’s something I’ll never know.
 

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People line breed, to have more consistent predictable traits in litter. When breeding high COIs produce great dogs, your a genius.
When things go terribly wrong, your a fool.

We each have to decide, what we are comfortable purchasing when it comes to dog ownership.
 
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Hey guys. Long time lurker here. Just joined.

Been searching for a while and doing my research on the breed and finally narrowed down few breeders

One breeder I've found (well known on here) has a litter available in 8 weeks.

Looking at the pedigree, looks like the sire and dam share the same sire (half siblings). Does this cause inbreeding issues? or any issues at all? The sire and dam seem well accomplished, have good health records, etc

Thanks in advance for any information.
If you are in doubt, we found a great breeder, Valley Creek Vizslas, after a very long search. Our pup we got from them is amazing. She is 7 months old now, super smart, came crate-trained, slept in her crate from night one, no crying at all. She loves our first, 5 yr. old Vizsla, & has great temperament. They have a great web-site go check out.
 
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