Hungarian Vizsla Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, we’ll be picking up our puppy in two weeks time, lock down permitting. Due to lock down we haven’t had opportunity to view puppies so have had to rely on videos and pictures to keep us abreast of the puppies development.

We’ve been advised which puppy we are getting and It’s clear from large number of clips sent the clips the puppy reserved for us is a bit smaller than most of the dogs in the litter, she also seems to be less active, less inquisitive,and less sure footed, e.g getting knocked over by the other puppies.

As new dog owners we are unsure how much should we read into this, for instance will a “small” puppy at this stage be a “small” adult, will a puppy with a timid nature be timid throughout its life a fed more susceptible to separation anxiety? Or do these factors level out as the puppy grows.

Any insights members have would be gratefully received.

Kind Regards
Lisbon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
My worry would be more of why your new pup is the runt. He may not be as healthy. I’d make sure his personality matches what you want. If it’s not then I’d find another to adopt. Odds are if he is smaller now, he will always be smaller.
I chose my V over his siblings cause he was the biggest, friendliest and most out going. Watch a few videos of the pups and you can see some personality. My dogs personality has been consistent to what I’ve seen in his pup videos at 8 weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply it’s much appreciated. Our challenge in appraising is the lack ability to view them together and we’re trying not to be too judgemental based on short clips....hopefully as the lockdown lifts we may be in a better position.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
my breeder would not allow visits and they were 2 hours away. So I also only could go off videos and their description of personality of each dog. I don’t think the situation is uncommon ?
My breeder posted almost daily videos on Facebook to watch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Depends what sort of dog you eventually hope for, a big boisterous boy or a quieter girl.

We went for the most outgoing, energetic boy 'Rafa' who was half the size of his brother 'Cairo', however even being so much smaller then he grew into a much larger than average male Vizsla and was described by his breeder as the 'mad one' which he certainly has been, but all in a good way.

Our friends have just gone for the quietest one in the litter as they wanted a nice calm Vizsla, if such a Vizsla exists, what they are after is really a 'calmer' Vizsla. I think I read somewhere that the puppies character is set by around 6 weeks, all Vizslas I have ever met have been adorable and lovely within the expected range of adult sizes too, with only one elderly female exception who was a rescue from Cyprus who was very small.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all for your replies, all very helpful and much appreciated. It’s not often I’m faced with taking the step into the unknown and this is one of these occasions. I’m sure all will go well as long as we dedicate the time and love to the puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
Have you expressed your concerns to the breeder? They should be able to clarify whether this is typical of the puppy–though if she's like this in all the videos it'd be hard to argue that it's not typical–and what it indicates to them about her future temperament. If you've picked an experienced and reputable breeder then it's usually wise to default to their choice, but they should be able to explain why this puppy is a good match for you. Then you can decide if their answer holds water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for your reply, based on our research the breeder does appear to be experienced and reputable, so as you suggest we would hope and expect they match the pups appropriately. Unless further updates reduce our concerns we will be raising our concerns at the appropriate point in time, and hopefully will be provided with the assurances we need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
A picture is sometimes not worth a thousand words.
Everything would depend on what you told the breeder you were looking for in a puppy, and where you were in the line.
Finn, my 7 month old, was the smallest of his litter. He also seemed to get "pushed" around a bit, but he did fight back, growled and barked at the others., but I was also concerned.
Now, and since the day we brought him into the house, he has been a very bold, forward, assertive, opinionated, puppy. He's virtually unflappable. The only thing I have exposed him to, that he has "shied away from", is a pneumatic impact wrench. ( I don't like the thing either. ;))
There is nothing wrong with a smaller, lighter, adult Vizlsa, as long as they meet the breed standard. The difference between a 25kg dog and a 30kg dog is quite a bit if you have to load it in and out of the car. I'll take the 25 kilo dog any day.;)
I've had six Vizslas through the years. The lightest, as an adult, was 22kg, and he was a rock and roller. He was tough as nails and could run like a deer. Great nose! He was a salty trained killer on birds. He was the boldest of his litter.
The biggest was about 30kg, and he was a total goofball, but could outswim an otter!! I've never seen another Vizlsa that could swim like that one. He was the runt of litter also, and was passed over, never getting picked for placement as a puppy. I got him as an 8 month old. Amazing dog! Absolutely incredible physical abilities! So darn smart too!
The point I am trying to make, is to not stress to much. Unless you're buying puppies as an investment in future trialing and breeding, reach in, grab one, and don't look back.
Love that dog, regardless of it's size. Make it a member of the household, and family, and you'll never even think about how big it is, for the rest of it's life.;)

PS
There is nothing at all wrong with having a dog that wants little to do with other dogs. It's a blesing in disguise. They're not kids. They don't need friends, or playmates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Hi Gunnr,
Thanks for taking the time to send such detailed insight and advice, you’re clearly someone who loves your dogs and that shines through between the lines. Yourself and the rest of the responders have genuinely helped us, what we’ve taken once we take the leap into getting the puppy is it’s as much about us as the dog, if we dedicate the time energy and love to the puppy we’ll get it all back in spades.

Thanks again to all the replies

Kind Regards
Lisbon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
Lisbon
It's a big unknown. It's a flip of the coin, or turn of the dice, so to speak.
The second dog I referred to, the goofball, I actually got when I went to pick out the one that ended up being the lightest.
The breeder knew from years of experience with me, that I wanted an on foot hunting dog, so she asked me if I would look at the 8 month old that had never been placed. He ran around with us for about a 1/2 hour with an apple in his mouth. He'd put it down, run off, come back and pick it up again. He did this repeatedly.
I told the breeder that yes, we would take the 8 month old, and come back for the second puppy in a month. A gentleman who was there at the time asked me why I would waste my time and take the untrained 8 month old that did nothing but run around picking up apples. I told him that what he missed observing was that the 8 month old always picked up the same apple, and again, and again.
That dog, goofball that he was, became the finest, "no slip" retriever I have ever had. I've had other Vizlsas that could handle ducks, but that guy was at a different level altogether.
Every Vizsla has their own personality and quirks, but universally, they like to be part of, and involved,in everything.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top