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Hi guys

We have a 10 week old female pup lives in a house with 2 kids and 2 other dogs.

5 days ago she has started showing signs of aggression when you try and move her.
She growled and snapped at other half and then happened with me moments later.
We did read to turn her over and hold her neck but to be honest we did this and I didnt see any difference. She did get a smack and told bold.
Any suggestions welcome please
 

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Seems to be happening more often in Vizsla puppies. Or atleast more new owners, are posting about the problem. Have you spoken to the breeder, and have they had this problem with other puppies?
 

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I wish that folks could post a short video of the aggressive behavior.
True aggression, in a 9-10 week old puppy would be very, very, rare, for any breed. It's just not the expectation.
Mock fighting and resource guarding are very much instinctive behaviors, and they do start early in puppies, 5 weeks on, and I wonder if this is what people are experiencing.
With two other dogs and two kids, you are going to have a very hectic environment for a new puppy, especially if the other dogs are older, and she is being forced to stand her ground with them.
Flipping her on her back, exposing her belly, and putting clamping pressure on her neck, are dominance based training methods typically used for more aggressive breeds, with less mental ability than a Vizlsa, and she is way to young to understand what you are trying to do. She is reacting on pure instinctive behavior, and she will fight back. She will quickly learn to mistrust you, or fear you, and then you have a problem to overcome.
At this point in time, she doesn't really even have her adult brain, so you probably put her in the fight, or flee, syndrome. I strongly recommend that you DO NOT continue to use this behavioral modification technique. It generally does not work out well with a Vizsla.
Any type of physical correction with a 9-10 week old puppy has to be very carefully considered. They're not old enough for physical correction, or "smacks". A light tap to the nose for nipping and biting, and gentle restraint. No smacks. If she is truly unruly and just not responding, put her in her crate, and give her some time to calm down. Please don't smack her any more. Better to just put her away, than risk permanent physical damage. Your hand and arm weigh more than she does. It's a mass equation. Once again, please don't smack her.
Do not "flip her over and try to dominate her any longer. That day may eventually come, but it is not necessary at 9-10 weeks old.
I would recommend some books on puppy development and training. Get her away from the other dogs and children, and start to focus your attention on her. Make sure she is getting enough uninterrupted sleep time. Do not leave it up to her, to "make her own way", or set her daily schedule.
I apologize if I am being judgemental. I only have what you have written to respond too.

Gunnr ( Mike)
 

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Hi Gunnr, I read your reply with interest. I have a male 10 week old pup Reggie who is very boisterous as expected. I am a 1st Vizsla owner and I’m trying to do all I can to make his life happy. Reggie is a biter and although initially I was coping it’s now quite bad, I’m trying all the ways I read to correct him, leaving the room, time out and a stern NO’ to very little response. I’m assuming he will grow out of this and has some really gentle moments but I can’t help but wonder what else I could b doing to reduce this. Any advice gratefully received.
 

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Kazi.
You just have to get through it. For the next two months he's going to be mouthy. My hands looked like I had been working with barbed wire from Finn. Those puppy teeth are so **** sharp. 10 weeks is still young. He doesn't yet have full"memory" functions, so every time it happens, it's like it is the first time. In the next two weeks he will develop his adult brain, and the lessons will start to "stick with him".
Start putting him to work. multiple, short, 5 minute sessions, on a leash. Even in the house. Finn wore a 1m leash for quite awhile in the house. We used to do lots of training in the kitchen and living room, and it really helps when they get mouthy and unruly. The leash is already attached, so you don't have to wrestle with them to get it on. It's a pop up, let's go.
It will stop. By 4 months old Finn had effectively stopped, which coincided with his outside field work. Now at 8 months, he's quietly lying under the chair I'm sitting at.
 

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Thanks so much, I appreciate your reply. Never thought about using the leash indoors but I will give it a try. Great to know there is light at the end of the tunnel, I appreciate I’m maybe expecting too much from such a young pup and as you say he’s still developing so I will try and not get too stressed. Ant tips on what you would recommend as training initially ? He’s not bad at recall, fetch and sit but so much conflicting advice out there I’m not sure what’s best for him at this age. Thanks again
 

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I will always advise that the best way to train a Vizlsa, from proven hunting/trialing stock, is to train it as if you intend to hunt it, even if you have no intent to ever hunt with it. You never have to own a shotgun, or kill a bird, and the training program/process is proven. It's almost formulaic.
I've also seen the agility, and sport dog competitions and they look really cool! and would be an excellent way to train, but I know little to nothing about that type of training/competition.


If he's recalling at all, which is great!! sitting, and fetching, those are the foundation cornerstones of the "retrieve". You lack the "Steady" only.
Make no mistake about it, the "Retrieve', when it's complete, encompasses almost all of the foundations of obedience and discipline training. I know that everyone thinks "it's a game", throw a ball, or a Frisbee, what's the big deal??but it is much, much more than that.
Keep working that retrieve. Short sessions, don't burn him out. Use different toys, or get a small training dummy. Line him up in a "chute", like a hallway, so that he has to come back to you. Keep working with him.
How to train for the Retrieve;
Toss the desired object and let the puppy chase after it and hopefully bring it back to you. You may need to attach a 5m lead to his collar to help him back to you. You do not pull him back to you. You apply pressure,and the moment he begins to come to you, release the pressure. You may have to do this 10, or 20 times in 10 meters.
After he gets the hang of this start to do two things. Firstly, command "Fetch" and as the object is in the air clap your hands. Not loudly at first, you're just trying to create a distraction. It will get progressively louder later. The reason you are doing these two tings is to set yourself up down the line for "Steadying", and determining if your dog is sensitive to noises and distractions, which could be an indicator of possible gun shyness, that you would have to factor in when presenting the gun some months down the line.
The puppy returns the object "to hand". This means he brings it back to you, and does not release it, until you have positive control of the object. He doesn't drop it at your feet and wait for another. The reason being that you would not want a hunting dog to drop a crippled bird at your feet, that may try to run, or fly off. Do not try to reach straight for his mouth in the beginning. Lots of body rubs, pets, ear massages, etc, while slowly bringing one hand up from his throat, and under his muzzle, Grab a hold of the object and command "Out". He probably will not give it you. Gently push one finger into the corner of his mouth, while continuing all of the body rubbing and pets, and keep commanding "Out". As soon as you have the object, make a ib fuss and toss it again
Once you've got your puppy going after the toss,or roll, consistently. Not responding to the clapping, and more or less bringing tthe object back to you,you're ready to move on, and you will start to delay the puppy for a second, or two, after the toss, and then commanding "Fetch". You will work on this for a few months. Multiple, short, sessions. Eventually it moves outside and morphs into ta more complicated game with multiple retrieving dummies, and more, louder, distractions.
Take what the puppy is giving you and work from there. Sometimes they are ready for one aspect of training before another, so you have to be flexible and adaptable.
 

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Thanks so much. I really appreciate this, just the guidance I needed to start me off on the right track. I’ll keep working in ‘retrieve’ and slowly build as he grows. Thanks again
 

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I wish that folks could post a short video of the aggressive behavior.
True aggression, in a 9-10 week old puppy would be very, very, rare, for any breed. It's just not the expectation.
Mock fighting and resource guarding are very much instinctive behaviors, and they do start early in puppies, 5 weeks on, and I wonder if this is what people are experiencing.
With two other dogs and two kids, you are going to have a very hectic environment for a new puppy, especially if the other dogs are older, and she is being forced to stand her ground with them.
Flipping her on her back, exposing her belly, and putting clamping pressure on her neck, are dominance based training methods typically used for more aggressive breeds, with less mental ability than a Vizlsa, and she is way to young to understand what you are trying to do. She is reacting on pure instinctive behavior, and she will fight back. She will quickly learn to mistrust you, or fear you, and then you have a problem to overcome.
At this point in time, she doesn't really even have her adult brain, so you probably put her in the fight, or flee, syndrome. I strongly recommend that you DO NOT continue to use this behavioral modification technique. It generally does not work out well with a Vizsla.
Any type of physical correction with a 9-10 week old puppy has to be very carefully considered. They're not old enough for physical correction, or "smacks". A light tap to the nose for nipping and biting, and gentle restraint. No smacks. If she is truly unruly and just not responding, put her in her crate, and give her some time to calm down. Please don't smack her any more. Better to just put her away, than risk permanent physical damage. Your hand and arm weigh more than she does. It's a mass equation. Once again, please don't smack her.
Do not "flip her over and try to dominate her any longer. That day may eventually come, but it is not necessary at 9-10 weeks old.
I would recommend some books on puppy development and training. Get her away from the other dogs and children, and start to focus your attention on her. Make sure she is getting enough uninterrupted sleep time. Do not leave it up to her, to "make her own way", or set her daily schedule.
I apologize if I am being judgemental. I only have what you have written to respond too.

Gunnr ( Mike)
Could not agree with you more, Gunnar. Vizsla’s are very sensitive & remember everything...
Hi guys

We have a 10 week old female pup lives in a house with 2 kids and 2 other dogs.

5 days ago she has started showing signs of aggression when you try and move her.
She growled and snapped at other half and then happened with me moments later.
We did read to turn her over and hold her neck but to be honest we did this and I didnt see any difference. She did get a smack and told bold.
Any suggestions welcome please
I totally agree with what Gunnr replied. I highly recommend to take this baby V to puppy obedience classes. A good trainer will teach positive training only. V’s are highly intelligent & sensitive. You & the pup will learn together. When your V is bigger you will be so glad you took the time to train when young. They train very easily & remember everything.
 

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Hi guys

We have a 10 week old female pup lives in a house with 2 kids and 2 other dogs.

5 days ago she has started showing signs of aggression when you try and move her.
She growled and snapped at other half and then happened with me moments later.
We did read to turn her over and hold her neck but to be honest we did this and I didnt see any difference. She did get a smack and told bold.
Any suggestions welcome please
Hi,
We have 2 male Vizsla 1 is 4 and the other will turn a year on Sunday 6/21. Our oldest V does not like to be moved and has always done the growling when we move him. Of course my husband and I are softies and let the dogs sleep in our bed, sit on the couch 😬
We have not had any hard bites although a lot of mouthing as puppiesI find Vizsla to be talkers and found our oldest V to use a lot of noises let us know he is comfortable and does not want to be moved.
Your 10 week old might be trying to figure out where she fits in the pack. She left her litter and is in a new home so sounds like she is finding her way.
With our oldest Vizsla we would kick him off the bed or couch to remind him we are the pack leaders.
A new puppy is always a bit rough in the beginning. Try to remember this too shall pass.
Good luck and enjoy your new baby
 
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