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My boy Rafa is nearly 70 pounds in weight and at 2 1/2 years old he still pulls like a Husky when on a regular lead and collar or harness.

He will 'heel' perfectly off lead, but on lead he has to step in front and be the first when walking. He was the dominant pup from his litter, full of energy and described by his breeder as 'the mad one'!

We have tried every known method of correcting this non heeling behaviour on the lead, he will drop back on the 'heel' verbal command for about 2 seconds then 'forgets' and charges ahead again every single time, but only when on the lead.

If I walk alonside a wall so close that he can't physically get past me and has to stay behind, he will wait for the first driveway gap and charge ahead at that point.

We tried a halter lead which did stop him pulling totally, but he was losing fur on his nose which thankfully now has grown back albeit darker and we no longer use the halter for that reason.

Where we live in a town we can't allow him to be off lead because of the traffic and he is so strong he can easily pull over other family members.

Is Rafa too old now to change this habit or is there any new advice from the forum please?

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He is not to old to change his ways.
He is going to do it, as long as he is allowed to do it. At 70lbs, that would kill my shoulder in no time. You have to have the mind set, that you are going to a stop, each time he pulls, and only walk if there is slack on the lead. Between having to stop, and do turns, you won't get any where fast during the walk.
I double leash some dogs. One using a half hitch, and the other just to the collar. It just gives me more control, while they are learning.
 

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You mentioned he is a driven, young vizsla. So yes, he can learn it, but you cannot expect that leash walking will be a way of releasing that excess energy he has (most possibly in the mornings). You can certainly train him with the traditional methods for leash walking, just as Texasred described, but you will need to a find a way for real exercise for a while. And practice the leash walking inside of your home home, backyard, then parking lots etc, but don`t have the mindset for a while that let`s go for an hour walk in the park and heel there like an obedience champion. The way you are describing it reminds me a lot of what i had to do with Bende, very similar situation (even the halter nose rub!), and although only 50 pounds, he is very strong.
I have found that you can control them if needed with the belly band (you can buy that type of leash or just make it yourself from a longer leash). Attaching a photo of a leash with Bende, so that you can see what i mean.
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks both for saying he is not too old to learn, boy is he stubborn though. I noticed yesterday he pulled like mad with excitement at the start of his walk to the rural area where he gets off lead 'free dog' exercise, the walk back on lead he was almost perfect with a loose lead most of the way except for one corner where he always marks.

I have tried and tried the stop walking trick until he eases off, one day it took us around 40 minutes to walk 1/2 mile normally the pair of us are fast walkers, I have noticed if I walk slower the pulling is not quite as bad.

That belly band is something I have not seen before at all. How do you use it? Is it like the nose halter it applies pressure to the belly if the dog pulls?
 

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The creek where i let my 2 gangsters run off leash daily is at the end of my street, for me alone would be approximately 90 seconds to get there. On the way there (especially with the two boys) we have similar attempts and sometimes it takes 5-6 minutes to get there. On the way back they are the perfect example of loose leash walking, just like you see them on those before and after videos lol.

So the leash wraps the dog around, and it is meant to be under the front legs. That way you can control him easily and not putting pressure on any sensitive belly parts like the organs.

here is an amazon link (i realize you are in the UK), it even has some videos. You can create your own version too, if you do not have the extra loop on your long lead, you can use the snap to hook back the lead.

 

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The creek where i let my 2 gangsters run off leash daily is at the end of my street, for me alone would be approximately 90 seconds to get there. On the way there (especially with the two boys) we have similar attempts and sometimes it takes 5-6 minutes to get there. On the way back they are the perfect example of loose leash walking, just like you see them on those before and after videos lol.

So the leash wraps the dog around, and it is meant to be under the front legs. That way you can control him easily and not putting pressure on any sensitive belly parts like the organs.

here is an amazon link (i realize you are in the UK), it even has some videos. You can create your own version too, if you do not have the extra loop on your long lead, you can use the snap to hook back the lead.

Amazon US Price = $26.99 = £20.22:)

Amazon UK Price = £27.30 + £6.47 UK Delivery = $45.08:oops::unsure:

Highway Robbery! :mad:
 

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My boy Rafa is nearly 70 pounds in weight and at 2 1/2 years old he still pulls like a Husky when on a regular lead and collar or harness.

He will 'heel' perfectly off lead, but on lead he has to step in front and be the first when walking. He was the dominant pup from his litter, full of energy and described by his breeder as 'the mad one'!

We have tried every known method of correcting this non heeling behaviour on the lead, he will drop back on the 'heel' verbal command for about 2 seconds then 'forgets' and charges ahead again every single time, but only when on the lead.

If I walk alonside a wall so close that he can't physically get past me and has to stay behind, he will wait for the first driveway gap and charge ahead at that point.

We tried a halter lead which did stop him pulling totally, but he was losing fur on his nose which thankfully now has grown back albeit darker and we no longer use the halter for that reason.

Where we live in a town we can't allow him to be off lead because of the traffic and he is so strong he can easily pull over other family members.

Is Rafa too old now to change this habit or is there any new advice from the forum please?

View attachment 102929
Hello Philip
My boy Rafa is nearly 70 pounds in weight and at 2 1/2 years old he still pulls like a Husky when on a regular lead and collar or harness.

He will 'heel' perfectly off lead, but on lead he has to step in front and be the first when walking. He was the dominant pup from his litter, full of energy and described by his breeder as 'the mad one'!

We have tried every known method of correcting this non heeling behaviour on the lead, he will drop back on the 'heel' verbal command for about 2 seconds then 'forgets' and charges ahead again every single time, but only when on the lead.

If I walk alonside a wall so close that he can't physically get past me and has to stay behind, he will wait for the first driveway gap and charge ahead at that point.

We tried a halter lead which did stop him pulling totally, but he was losing fur on his nose which thankfully now has grown back albeit darker and we no longer use the halter for that reason.

Where we live in a town we can't allow him to be off lead because of the traffic and he is so strong he can easily pull over other family members.

Is Rafa too old now to change this habit or is there any new advice from the forum please?

View attachment 102929
Hello Philip - our Vizsla is just over 3 years old and is just about calming down. We had the pulling problems from day one along with all the usual traits! After trying almost everything, we purchased a lead which clasps on his chest rather than his neck and it was like someone had waved a magic wand.
My boy Rafa is nearly 70 pounds in weight and at 2 1/2 years old he still pulls like a Husky when on a regular lead and collar or harness.

He will 'heel' perfectly off lead, but on lead he has to step in front and be the first when walking. He was the dominant pup from his litter, full of energy and described by his breeder as 'the mad one'!

We have tried every known method of correcting this non heeling behaviour on the lead, he will drop back on the 'heel' verbal command for about 2 seconds then 'forgets' and charges ahead again every single time, but only when on the lead.

If I walk alonside a wall so close that he can't physically get past me and has to stay behind, he will wait for the first driveway gap and charge ahead at that point.

We tried a halter lead which did stop him pulling totally, but he was losing fur on his nose which thankfully now has grown back albeit darker and we no longer use the halter for that reason.

Where we live in a town we can't allow him to be off lead because of the traffic and he is so strong he can easily pull over other family members.

Is Rafa too old now to change this habit or is there any new advice from the forum please?

View attachment 102929
My boy Rafa is nearly 70 pounds in weight and at 2 1/2 years old he still pulls like a Husky when on a regular lead and collar or harness.

He will 'heel' perfectly off lead, but on lead he has to step in front and be the first when walking. He was the dominant pup from his litter, full of energy and described by his breeder as 'the mad one'!

We have tried every known method of correcting this non heeling behaviour on the lead, he will drop back on the 'heel' verbal command for about 2 seconds then 'forgets' and charges ahead again every single time, but only when on the lead.

If I walk alonside a wall so close that he can't physically get past me and has to stay behind, he will wait for the first driveway gap and charge ahead at that point.

We tried a halter lead which did stop him pulling totally, but he was losing fur on his nose which thankfully now has grown back albeit darker and we no longer use the halter for that reason.

Where we live in a town we can't allow him to be off lead because of the traffic and he is so strong he can easily pull over other family members.

Is Rafa too old now to change this habit or is there any new advice from the forum please?

View attachment 102929
Hello Philip - our Vizsla is just over 3 years old and used to pull on any walk even when he was tired. We tried everything we read up on and finally cracked it when we bought a harness that fastens to the front near his chest, rather than on his neck - it genuinely worked straight away. The lead company are called Easy Walk - cannot recommend the lead highly enough.
 

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My boy Rafa is nearly 70 pounds in weight and at 2 1/2 years old he still pulls like a Husky when on a regular lead and collar or harness.

He will 'heel' perfectly off lead, but on lead he has to step in front and be the first when walking. He was the dominant pup from his litter, full of energy and described by his breeder as 'the mad one'!

We have tried every known method of correcting this non heeling behaviour on the lead, he will drop back on the 'heel' verbal command for about 2 seconds then 'forgets' and charges ahead again every single time, but only when on the lead.

If I walk alonside a wall so close that he can't physically get past me and has to stay behind, he will wait for the first driveway gap and charge ahead at that point.

We tried a halter lead which did stop him pulling totally, but he was losing fur on his nose which thankfully now has grown back albeit darker and we no longer use the halter for that reason.

Where we live in a town we can't allow him to be off lead because of the traffic and he is so strong he can easily pull over other family members.

Is Rafa too old now to change this habit or is there any new advice from the forum please?

View attachment 102929
Not too old at all! i recommend a 2.25 herm sprenger prong collar. works magic! snap the leash everytime he begins to forge ahead. treat or praise when by your side. it should fit way up behind the ears for best corrections.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the further suggestions, may give some of them a try. That prong collar looks too mean though, advertised here in UK as a punishment collar so will probably not try that, but will use more of the treat and praise suggestion when he is at my side. Cheddar cheese is his favourite :rolleyes:
 

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Thanks for the further suggestions, may give some of them a try. That prong collar looks too mean though, advertised here in UK as a punishment collar so will probably not try that, but will use more of the treat and praise suggestion when he is at my side. Cheddar cheese is his favourite :rolleyes:
When a owner is taught how to use them correctly, they are not really a punishment collar. But they are a no yank, no pull collar. You need to be a calm, relaxed owner, if you plan on using one. They really are not for owners that can become frustrated, and put to much pressure on a dogs lead.
I don't really use them, but have been in plenty of obedience classes where they were used correctly. The dogs had no problem with them. In fact they were all happy.
I look at it this way.
All the pressure you feel in your shoulder, when dogs pull like freight train, is the same amount of pressure being put on the dogs neck.
I do have a leather collar, that has blunt metal studs on the inside. I do use it some for dogs that want to leap when the bird flushes. It keeps them from tearing up my shoulder, as I'm on the other end of the check cord.
They have been walked, heeled, and worked on whoa with the collar, before I use it with flushing birds. They are the ones that apply the pressure to this collar, not me. And they learn very quickly, what is comfortable, and what is not.
 

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That is a Martingale collar.
Some dogs don't pull as bad with them, and others it does not stop the pulling. I use them when transporting fosters. The collar tightens if the pull, and it keeps them from slipping a collar off, and escaping.

The point of any training tool, is to work on them following a command. As they become accustomed to folllowing the comand, you rely less on the tool.
 
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My V would routinely bust out of a prong collar. He did a quick twist and snap. And boom.

Anyway, I recommend lots of exercise. Try joring with him using a Walky Dog. We got one of of Amazon and our V is so happy. We also hike with him off leash as much as possible when it's safe. He needs to smell and track and run around.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Rafa gets lots of off lead time every day, often we go to the mountains here in the Lake District National Park or the lower fells every day, he travels there in the car and gets off leash almost straight away for hours of fun.

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One or two days a week we have to walk him through our town about a mile to get to the rural area on the outskirts for his off leash time, it is that walk through town and back when the worst pulling occurs, he is so excited he can't wait to get there and wants us to speed up to get him there quicker. In the winter when the pavements are slippery he can easily pull the girls over.
 

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Beautiful area. If i was a vizsla and knew that this is where i am heading to, i would pull too!
On the other hand, that offers a great opportunity to practice self control and patience. Don`t give up, he will get it.
 

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Following all of this & also looking for advise. Lucy is almost 5 now, she has always done fairly well about NOT pulling. She wears a front hook harness. We run daily, she gets several walks a day. I have noticed the last few months though she seems to be losing her walking manors, she too is now pulling & will jump over into the grass trying to sniff constantly. I try to stop midway on our walks to give her some sniffing around time, but any other suggestions?? I know there are mixed feelings about the prong collars, but I successfully used them with prior labs & kind of wish I had trained Lucy with one. At 5 is it too late to try new training methods?
 

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I don't see it being to late.
When I adopted a adult Vizsla with separation anxiety, we completed a basic obedience class. Then other obedience classes .He earned a CGC, and trick title. We were never sure if his age, somewhere between 7, and 9 years old when he came to me.

Right now we are training a 6-7 year old Vizsla duck hunt, and he's doing very well. We introduced him to dove hunting last year.
While he had did a little hunting before coming to us. Both of these things are new to him.
 
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