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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took Finn hunting at a Preserve on Wednesday. It was an interesting experience.
We had a big field to hunt that had grass 5’-7’ tall, and thick swampy edge cover.Most of the time I couldn’t even see Finn, I could just hear his bell and watch the grass tops shake. Overall he did good. He got to experience Chukar for the first time, and he really liked those!! We do have to work on his “ hunting dead” though. It took a little bit for him to understand what I wanted, after that, he picked it up fine. In that tall grass, he was going to have to learn to hunt dead. I guess I should have already worked with him on it.😳
Here is a photo of Finn with his “catch”.😉
Dog Phasianidae Chicken Working animal Fawn
 

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looks very nice and no doubt you both had fun.
i took the boys last year several times to a hunting preserve here in Texas. It was overall good too for training purposes, the one we went to would be too small for real hunting in my view. We usually ordered quails, but came across several chuckars and pheasants too, so that was an added bonus.
 

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It doesn't get better than that - so much fun for the both of you.

“hunting dead” was new to me, but Google helped & it means finding a dead bird. Googling for it returned too many hits about dead dogs - not what I wanted to see.
 

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I’ve had dogs that would not give up on finding a dead bird, and ones that would only put in a small amount of effort to find them. The small amount of effort dogs, was because they would rather go back to hunting live birds. But the live hunt needed to stop, until the dead/wounded bird was found.

Some of the old timers just to teach the puppies find it, by throwing treats in the yard. Said it made the transition easier, when teaching dead bird.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep, a dog and the hunter have to expend the effort the find the downed bird.
Our previous hunting has been in wooded areas and state lands that are nowhere near the grass density this area was. There was just no way for Finn to even have an idea of the bird's flight path, or where it went down.
I would mark the bird and bring Finn into the area and we would search in expanding and contracting circles, until we found it. He didn't quite understand why I was leading him to an area, but once he got a hold of the bird scent, he knew what we were there for.
Most were easy, and he went right to them. One was tough and took us quite awhile to find. In retrospect, I shouldn't have attempted the shot. I hit it, but not cleanly, and we had a track meet going for about 20-30 minutes. This particular facility requires the use of non toxic shot, so I was using Bismuth, which is about 16% less mass density, and the effective range does not match lead. I think that with lead, I would have put it down cleanly, but was probably at the end of the effective range of Bismuth.
Now that I understand how the "preserve hunt" works, next time it will be a morning hunt, where he's not overwhelmed with all of the bird scent in the field from the morning session, and can concentrate on "cleaner/hotter" foot scent. Maybe some snow and ice will knock that switch grass down.
Finn is a little subdued today. He did a lot of work yesterday, so we're giving it a break for a day or two. I think I'm going to give him a few good fun days, then we'll get after it again Monday.
 
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