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Hello everyone!

I am new to the Vizsla forum and I am so thankful to have come across this website to learn what other vizsla owners are experiencing with their dogs. I am a first time Vizsla owner and have completely fallen in love with the breed.

I have a 6 month old male Vizsla. Our veterinarian mentioned that we should be neutering our puppy around the age of 6 months. Seems alittle young to me, and I keep reading conflicting research. I would greatly appreciate some insight into this topic on when other vizsla owners may have neutered their male pups. Pros and cons would be wonderful.

Thank you! :)
 

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6 months really is too young imo, others may disagree though. I'd wait till pup is at very least 2 years old, and his bones, plates etc have fully grown.
 

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..oh, and welcome to the forum Ollie ;)
 

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Search neutering in the search bar on this forum and you'll find lots of information.

Why do you want to neuter your dog?

Studies have shown the best thing for overall health is to leave male dogs intact.

Having said that, lots of people find it easier to neuter their dog. If you do decide to go that route definitely wait til your dog matures into an adult - at least 2 years of age is my opinion.
 

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Oh, no... :eek:

There's a lot of very convincing evidence that you shouldn't be neutering your dog at all, and that neutering actually increases the risk for cancers and other health issues.

Why do you think you need to?
 

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Frankly, if a vet gave me that advice, I'd be looking for a new vet.

There have been three major scientific studies on spay/neuter (the Rottweiler Study, The Golden Retriever Study, and the Visza Study). All three show the devastating consequences of early neutering.

It is well worth reading these studies, or summaries of the studies.

Male Vs are much better off being left intact. The scientific evidence validates what those of us with long experience with versatile gundogs have known all along.

Best wishes,

Bill
 

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I can't speak for neutering because I have only ever owned females.
We left our girl from being spayed until she was 18 months old and not gone through a heat cycle.
However the vet was pushing to do it anyway at 6 months. My guess is that it is the "RESPONSIBLE PET OWNER" thing to do. It may not have been what our breeder or ourselves wanted to see.
 

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My vet said to wait until they are at least 3 or 4 years old - to allow the testosterone to fully develop their muscles. She said that they will have fewer orthopedic issues later in life because their muscles are stronger and can support them better.
 

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It's all up to interpretation. Your vet knows what they know and there are new articles with research stating that it's better to wait. A year should be enough time for the growth plates to close. Everyone on here is incredibly opinionated, myself included, so I would do your own research and make your decision.


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A year doesn't get one full muscular development. My intact male V (almost 22 months) looks very different now that he did at 12 months, or even 18 months. Vs are slow to mature, and keep building up their muscular development up to about 3 years at peak. Strong bodies help stabilize joints, which is particularly critical in athletic high energy breeds such as ours.

The downsides of neutering have been replicated in multiple studies. The evidence is unambiguous.

Bill
 

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Use common sense....

Many vets are not up to date....

Think about what would happen if you neutered a 12 year old boy. That is the same idea of neutering a one year old dog. Think about how much physical and mental development they would miss out on by removing the hormones necessary to mature into an adult man.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you for all your opinions. I definitely thought that 6 months as alittle young, and wanted to see if any other owners have heard the same from their vets. I did some research, and read many articles. Definitely will be waiting awhile (aiming to never having to neuter him, unless it is absolutely necessary for his health and socialization).
 

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Ollie said:
Thank you for all your opinions. I definitely thought that 6 months as alittle young, and wanted to see if any other owners have heard the same from their vets. I did some research, and read many articles. Definitely will be waiting awhile (aiming to never having to neuter him, unless it is absolutely necessary for his health and socialization).
I'm aware of only two reasons when neutering is justified for reasons of health. One is in cases of testicular cancer, which is extremely rare. The other is if (at later stages of life) an enlarged prostate is in danger of impeding urine flow. This condition is not totally uncommon, but—because prostate engagement is testosterone dependent—removing the tests almost immediately reverses the condition. In neither case is routine prophylactic neutering justifiable on health grounds.

In terms of behavior, intact dogs are usually friendlier, more social, and more confident.

With breeds with some behavior issues, like separation anxiety, fear of loud noises, and the like, neutering has been shown to exacerbate the negative behavioral issues. Vs are somewhat prone to these problems in any case. Magnifying the problems is ill advised.

Bill
 

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spy car is correct, in addition to our two V's, we have a 16 year old dachshund. When he was 11 he developed a huge mass on his prostate. Vet thought it was cancer. Gave him 2 months to live. We had him immediately neutered and gave him some sort of tumor shrinking drug for 30 days. When he went back to the vet for his follow up it was 100% gone. Five years later....he's still here!
 

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Here are the papers on this topic that we often cite (vizsla study, rottie study, golden retriever study) plus a literature review that predates the vizsla/golden retriever studies. If you see anything interesting in the reference sections, just let me know... I'll try to access the PDFs and post them here.
 

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emilycn said:
Here are the papers on this topic that we often cite (vizsla study, rottie study, golden retriever study) plus a literature review that predates the vizsla/golden retriever studies. If you see anything interesting in the reference sections, just let me know... I'll try to access the PDFs and post them here.
Thank you so much!

I does appear the link for the Vizsla Study is faulty (I'm getting another copy of the Golden Study following that link).

Bill
 

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Hi All!

I know this thread is a little old, but it is exactly what I was looking for. I'm new to actually posting on here, even though I've been perusing the forums for months. We got our V boy, Amos, in early February. He's now almost 4 months. We have a vet who likes to neuter at 9 months but seems open and flexible to whatever we want. We hope to not neuter at all and many of your posts have encouraged us on this thinking. I have a couple of questions....

1. Has anyone on here had a vasectomy done on their male? We read about it as an option but also read that finding a trained vet is difficult. The thinking is the dog keeps all his good hormones, but obviously shoots blanks.

2. If you wait (and I realize this may be a stupid questions) and have to do a full neuter later in life for some reason, do you potentially miss a crucial "window" like with horses or something??? making your dog mean???

3. For those of you who haven't neutered your males, what challenges have you faced because of it? I've read all the things that CAN be worse (spraying, humping, aggression) but I'm curious about ACTUAL experiences. I stay home so we have plenty of time and opportunity for training. I guess I'm just afraid some of these "worsened behaviors" would not be correctable because of the hormones.

Thanks for any input you can offer.
 

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HeCallsMeBama said:
Hi All!

I know this thread is a little old, but it is exactly what I was looking for. I'm new to actually posting on here, even though I've been perusing the forums for months. We got our V boy, Amos, in early February. He's now almost 4 months. We have a vet who likes to neuter at 9 months but seems open and flexible to whatever we want. We hope to not neuter at all and many of your posts have encouraged us on this thinking. I have a couple of questions....

1. Has anyone on here had a vasectomy done on their male? We read about it as an option but also read that finding a trained vet is difficult. The thinking is the dog keeps all his good hormones, but obviously shoots blanks.

2. If you wait (and I realize this may be a stupid questions) and have to do a full neuter later in life for some reason, do you potentially miss a crucial "window" like with horses or something??? making your dog mean???

3. For those of you who haven't neutered your males, what challenges have you faced because of it? I've read all the things that CAN be worse (spraying, humping, aggression) but I'm curious about ACTUAL experiences. I stay home so we have plenty of time and opportunity for training. I guess I'm just afraid some of these "worsened behaviors" would not be correctable because of the hormones.

Thanks for any input you can offer.
All the dogs I've owned have been intact males. I've never opted for a vasectomy, but would certainly consider it as the best sterilization option. As you say, finding a vet trained to do this simple procedure isn't always easy. My hope is that the reality of the harms caused by neutering will change the training in veterinary schools (and continuing vet education) so hormone sparing alternatives will become widely available as an option.

Generally, especially with breeds like Vizslas, the behavioral differences in intact males are positives. Vs are rarely domineering and aggressive by nature, and those with "problems" generally have issues tied to "fear anxieties" which are usually made worse by castration. The added confidence of intact male Vs is usually a positive thing, and they are typically very diplomatic with other dogs.

I have know some individual dogs (most often from working breeds or fighting breeds) that have been poorly socialized and poorly trained where the hormones don't help the domineering behaviors. So it is not a 100% issue on behaviors with all dogs. My understanding (no experience here) is the removal of testes and hormones has a quick effect, positively or negatively.

Each dog I've owned (all versatile gundogs) would mark outside on tress, etc., but never in a problematic sort of way. None has ever marked indoors.

Humping is generally not an issue, but there are a few females (who I suspect may have some small parts of the ovaries intact) that my V will mildly annoy, and I have to correct. On the other hand, I see neutered dogs (and even females) who hump as well.

The biggest issue is that its possible that a neutered dog might launch into an unprovoked attack on an intact male. While rare, it can happen.

None of my dogs, current Vizsla included, has ever been aggressive. He is incredibly sweet natured with people and other dogs, and especially kind with little ones. Behaviorally I could not hope for better.

Bill
 
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