Hungarian Vizsla Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
we started to click training our V. the very first command suggested is come command. we followed steps and she seems to get the idea. listens and would come 90% of times called. that is inside. as soon as outside she wouldnt respond to the command. maybe 1 o9ut of 10 times. we take her off leash to the soccer field or just heve her around the house off leash when we hang outside too. she mostli stays close to us but i would feel much more comfortable if i knew that she comes when called. she is just sooo excited and distracted she wouldnt respond. any tips? thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Rule #1--NEVER call you dog then punish them--short memory dog will think they are being punished for coming to you.

Rule #2--Make coming when called the best thing that has happened all day for your dog. If Max comes to you from ANY distance when called, when he gets to you THROW A PARTY!!

Patience and repetition!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, thats exactly what we do. i mean we give her a treats, pets, cheers, all that stuff. than she sees something and stops listening. wouldnt even turn her head our direction, when we call her name.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Hi,

have to agree with DM. Keep plugging away with it and lots and lots of praise, but at the right time, ie when she comes and sits with you. Also when she comes to you put her lead on and walk with her for a minute and then let her off again. This lets her know that the lead doesn't mean the end of fun and she may be easier to come back if the lead doesn't mean home !!!

I am whistle training Peanut at the moment and she knows what it means but doesn't come back every time. Infact at the start of an off lead walk I don't even bother trying to get her back for at least 10 mins cos she is too distracted. Let her sniff for a bit then try, don't set her up to fail straight off wait a bit.

Goog luck,

Graham
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Also, don't forget that dogs "learn" by association. So, if you train them to "sit" in the living room, you also have to teach them how to "sit" in the bedroom, etc. ..for example. So, she may be getting it very well in your home, but add the distraction of being outside with a completely different environment, and you kind of have to refresh their memory.

So, you might want to consider keeping her on the lead, like you might have done at home, with short distances and build up to longer distances (you can buy pretty long leads!). The other thing that we did was the "red rover" game. My husband stood at one place and I at the other and we called him back and forth and made it a big party giving him lots of treats when he came (as PP suggested) and then we started to increase the distance between us.

I think it's normal for a V pup to be distracted! Well, a V at any age really! It just takes practice and making sure your're getting her used to all sorts of environments!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
Vlicked said:
Also, don't forget that dogs "learn" by association. So, if you train them to "sit" in the living room, you also have to teach them how to "sit" in the bedroom, etc. ..for example. So, she may be getting it very well in your home, but add the distraction of being outside with a completely different environment, and you kind of have to refresh their memory.
That is great advice that I had never thought of. Now it starts to make sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Chicken necks were the key for Merc and I, improved his recalls at the park by an amazing amount in 2 days. It astonished the other dog owners when he started bolting towards me at full speed as soon as i called instead of continuing to harass their dogs :) You might just need to find a special reward that he only gets for recalls.

He is still not brilliant at coming when particular distractions are around but we're working on it.

Also a trainer told me some of my body language was off-putting for a dog. Like when he started to come over I'd bend forward to pat / catch him and he immediately curved away. If I stay upright and move away a couple of steps as he starts looking at me it seems to work much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Mercutio said:
Also a trainer told me some of my body language was off-putting for a dog. Like when he started to come over I'd bend forward to pat / catch him and he immediately curved away. If I stay upright and move away a couple of steps as he starts looking at me it seems to work much better.
this is a very good point. You're more likely to get a dog to come to you if you actually turn your body the other way and act as if you're running away from them as opposed to leaning in towards them.

Reminds me of a good book about body language and dog handling called The Other End of the Leash. Can't remeber the author.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Exactly what our trainer told us

1# you've got to be the most interesting thing around!! harder than it sounds

2# never punish them returning- however long it takes them!! you can curse them as long as you keep smilling and do it in a soft voice. ha ha

3# use a high reward for returning - hot dog, liver cake salami.

4# never run to them always away.

5# use only one toy that thay have only off lead!!! makes it more rewarding to play with.

These are great boundries but don't 100% work all the time as attitude takes over sometimes :D
BB
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top