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Howdy, All! I am new (posting) to the forums and would like to thank all the contributors for the invaluable information you’ve provided me, as I lurked for months.

I am due to bring a beautiful vizsla baby home at the end of December. This date has been more than three years in the making. Excited? You can’t even imagine!

I have always had female dogs. Though, am considering a male vizsla.

My largest concern about a male, is when he reached sexual maturity and begins “Marking”. I have searched these forums and only found several posts related to this behavior. Within these posts, the males being described tended to have a very strong “Marking” compulsion.

I currently live in a large town (tiny city), which tends to lean on the “Yuppie” side. I intend on my baby being with me, out in public, continually. My concern lays with a male vizsla, who may excessively “Mark”. I wouldn’t want to be offensive to the general population, here. More so, I wish this baby to be exceptionally well socialized and wouldn’t want such an instinctual behavior, if excessive, to get in the way of this.

My question, to anyone with experience with males:

In general, do male vizslas have an extraordinarily strong desire to “Mark”?
Can “Marking” behavior be curbed through training?

Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you. :)
 

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Gratz on the anticipated new arrival!

I've always had unneutered boys, and they do have a tendency to sniff around outside and "mark" things like fire hydrants and bushes.....often to great lengths (and hilarity) to get theirs as high up as possible (the mark of true dominance!), but it's never been offensive or intrusive in the way you are anticipating...especially if you're good at supervising when they go in more public places (yes, you can do that).

But, the choice shouldn't be "Male Vs. Female", but rather the type of temperament/personality you're looking for and what works best for you. Talk with the breeder about that, and allow them to choose a puppy (regardless of gender) that fits your needs. Whatever individual or gender related quirks can be addressed with proper socialization and training.
 

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I've read some posts, on problems with males marking. But l really haven't had a problem with it. None of my males have marked in the house. Outside we have what is their time, and what is my time. When they are on their time, they decide whatever they want to do. Run, leap, sniff, mark till their hearts content.
When they are on my time, they are to walk nicely, and pay attention to what's asked of them.
They get a lot more of their time, than my time.
But them knowing the rules, makes it easier to take them some places.
 

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Well after reading these posts and seeing a lack of data I thought I would carry out some research on this subject with my 17 month old intact boy Vizsla 'Rafa'. He is a family pet and larger than average for the breed I think.

So I walked Rafa on lead yesterday and again today to a local park walking through built up residential areas of this town, 1 mile to get there and 1 mile to return.

On both days whilst on lead Rafa 'sprinkled' once for around a second on a stone corner wall where I had reduced our speed almost to a stop in order to open and close a gate. He didn't make any other attemps to 'sprinkle' whilst walking on lead at normal walking pace.

When in the open park land and running free off lead he was very busy sniffing the long grass on the edges and the cut grass in the middle of the fields, this area is frequented by a lot of other dogs.

On each of the two days he sprinkled in the open park land on the long grass bordering the edges about 5 times, mostly very short one second duration except for one longer sprinkle where I think he was clearly picking up the strong recent marking of another dog, he gave that spot a robust longer hosing for several seconds.

All in all, he never did anything that I would find concerning and pretty much the same activity as I see many other male dogs of other breeds doing.

I hope this data provides some reassurance.

Enjoy your Vizsla, they are simply wonderful loving dogs.
 
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