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Do any of you keep your Vizsla's outside in a kennel?

I will be getting a Vizsla pup in Sept / Oct and am toying with the idea of building an insulated and heated kennel with a large run on the end so he can stretch his legs a little when I am not at home. He is going to be a working dog and I know other breads that live out side and work tend to be tougher than ones that live inside. Can the Vizsla handle living outside as they are generally clingy? He will still be allowed in the house at times during the day and i am not just going to leave him outside and forget about him but it will give me peace of mind when i am out that he can go to the toilet without doing it in the house. Also what age would you suggest is best to put him outside at? or is just better to start from day 1?

Thanks in advance for any replies and help.

Dave
 

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Dave,

In a word NO. Vs need to be around their people, all of the books, articles, websites, breeders, owners agree. These are not labs or hounds. Vs bond very closely to their people and will not thrive in a kennel setting. While the kennel you describe sounds comfy, warmth is not the only concern.
 

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Dave

Where you live is the single biggest variable. That being said, I used to kennel my guys outside when I was at work in the nice weather, I live in Connecticut, but never in any inclimate or cold weather. My dogs were fully grown adult males and had each other for company when they were outside. They were never kenneled through the night, and once I was home they were out. Day 1 is definitley too soon.

A Vizsla has a single coat of hair, there is no under coat. They will not toughen up, nor acclimate to cold weather beyond a reasonable point. They will just suffer. They can handle some pretty extreme weather when they are active, but to just sit in a kennel, no.
Vizsla's are psychologically a "soft dog", and the term "clingy" is subjective. They need to be part of the family to achieve their most potential. They are very aware of where you are and what you are doing. They may not necessarily be right by your side, but their comfort zone is in knowing where you are.
"Psychologically soft" does not mean weak. They can be tough dogs,and you will literally, at times, have to hold them back from doing themselves harm. Their drive is incredible. Mine have come out of nasty briar patches bleeding from thorns while running down or retrieving a pheasant, or grouse. They are very tough.
The more time you spend with your Vizsla will pay off in the field.

Keep your V in the house with you. Use a crate, or indoor kennel when you aren't home. Kennel them outside on nice days if you can
 

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Gunnr said:
Dave

Where you live is the single biggest variable. That being said, I used to kennel my guys outside when I was at work in the nice weather, I live in Connecticut, but never in any inclimate or cold weather. My dogs were fully grown adult males and had each other for company when they were outside. They were never kenneled through the night, and once I was home they were out. Day 1 is definitley too soon.

A Vizsla has a single coat of hair, there is no under coat. They will not toughen up, nor acclimate to cold weather beyond a reasonable point. They will just suffer. They can handle some pretty extreme weather when they are active, but to just sit in a kennel, no.
Vizsla's are psychologically a "soft dog", and the term "clingy" is subjective. They need to be part of the family to achieve their most potential. They are very aware of where you are and what you are doing. They may not necessarily be right by your side, but their comfort zone is in knowing where you are.
"Psychologically soft" does not mean weak. They can be tough dogs,and you will literally, at times, have to hold them back from doing themselves harm. Their drive is incredible. Mine have come out of nasty briar patches bleeding from thorns while running down or retrieving a pheasant, or grouse. They are very tough.
The more time you spend with your Vizsla will pay off in the field.

Keep your V in the house with you. Use a crate, or indoor kennel when you aren't home. Kennel them outside on nice days if you can
Well said. I think it would be best just to crate train in this situation. As PP pointed out, they are hunting dogs but are not meant for kenneling. As comfy as it sounds.

I also wanted to say (off topic) it certainly is true about having to hold them back lest they harm themselves because of their incredible drive. They truly are great dogs and companions.
 

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Hey Dave-
Yes, the crate that you plan on building your pup does sound nice, but these dog really love/need to be around people. To me, my dog is not hyper but active...he'll stay by our side in the house and is ready to go hiking at the blink of an eye. I have close contacts with my dog's other siblings. All but one dog is in the with their owners. The dog that is outside with another Lab is not as "secure" when I see him. If you're not sure, I wouldn't recommend you getting a Vizsla-but they really are great dogs to have around-you wouldn't be disappointed....
 

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wilbert said:
He is going to be a working dog and I know other breads that live out side and work tend to be tougher than ones that live inside.
That is sooooo untrue! I worked for one of the largest Vizsla breeders in my state, and his dogs were in the house! Being inside or outside has no impact on hunting ability whatsoever. Sounds like someone made that up to justify keeping their dogs outside.

Hunting ability depends on genetics and training, not living environment.
 
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