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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

I come back to this gold mine for a forum for some much-needed advice. Our 9-month old intact male Pacifico is a very cheeky puppy that whines all day and definitely has a mind of his own. We now have to give commands several times before he obeys with a whine in protest, and teenage time has thrown away most of his training anyway.

Sometimes, we are very desperate and get very frustrated. We know that our stress affects him and makes his behaviour worse. We are constantly torn between two approaches: either listen to our instinct and let him do stuff we feel we have to avoid (like letting him on the sofa, eat before us, get away with not listening, give too much affection?) or apply what we've been told are necessary training techniques (punish him, be stern, ensure he doesn't think he's the alpha, etc.) This is our first dog, and god do we know now that a vizsla is not the best choice for the first-time owner...

When we follow our instinct, we are less stressed and Pacifico behaves better, but we can't help feeling guilty that he gets away with anything. When we apply more strict methods, we feel too harsh and guilty for upsetting him... We try to force ourselves not to give him too much attention and affection, and giving him some time alone, but there's no denying a vizsla puppy will try to get as much attention as possible, and he will whine for hours on end, which drives us mad... We're also a bit influenced by Cesar Millan, the Dog Whisperer, and his warning not to give too much affection.

Any advice on how to take or not to take other people's advice (people who don't have a vizsla, I guess, ha!) or following your instinct? Have you ever felt in your vizsla's puppyhood that you were trying to be a type owner you're not really?
 

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He's your dog, and you are the one that lives with him. Place rules that you are comfortable with.
FYI
Even well trained dogs, get to be naughty sometimes.
 
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Hi, like you I am a 1st time dog owner and as u say it’s an odd choice for a novice 🥴 my boy Reggie is now just over a year, I’ve had lots of advice (good and bad) but as Texasred advises he’s ur dog and my gut does tell me what I’m comfortable with. I have Also found out I put a lot of pressure on me and him, forgetting he’s a pup he’s gonna b naughty it’s what they do. I’d often tie myself up in knots when his recall dipped or he was pushing the boundaries. For example I was adamant he was not getting on couch but after a few weeks I relented, worrying I’d given in but boy his cuddles r worth it 😂
I can see changes for the better all the time so my hope is he’ll slowly get it one day and we can start to relax a little. I’m sure u will start to see the same changes

Can u give them too much attention? I’ve no idea I’m not experienced at all so I can’t comment. So my advice is only what worked for me b consistent and loving as much as possible but cut yourself some slack !
ps the forum is my life saver also
 

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IMO set your boundaries. Be flexible where it makes sense and don’t ever dominate or use tactics that would break their spirit. At the same time consequences are important for misbehavior. What those consequences are is open to internet debate.

With proper exercise off leash time I can work for hours at home while our 7 mos girl relaxes with me or downstairs on the couch. Don’t make the mistake that it is a behavioral problem at first before considering if the dog has had its mental/physical exercise. Many times both happen at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi, like you I am a 1st time dog owner and as u say it’s an odd choice for a novice 🥴 my boy Reggie is now just over a year, I’ve had lots of advice (good and bad) but as Texasred advises he’s ur dog and my gut does tell me what I’m comfortable with. I have Also found out I put a lot of pressure on me and him, forgetting he’s a pup he’s gonna b naughty it’s what they do. I’d often tie myself up in knots when his recall dipped or he was pushing the boundaries. For example I was adamant he was not getting on couch but after a few weeks I relented, worrying I’d given in but boy his cuddles r worth it 😂
I can see changes for the better all the time so my hope is he’ll slowly get it one day and we can start to relax a little. I’m sure u will start to see the same changes

Can u give them too much attention? I’ve no idea I’m not experienced at all so I can’t comment. So my advice is only what worked for me b consistent and loving as much as possible but cut yourself some slack !
ps the forum is my life saver also
Thank you Kazi, I identify with your post so much! Same story about the couch, and same story about beating myself up when things don't work... He's definitely gonna be a puppy by nature, and I once talked to a wirehaired Vizsla owner who told me that they are puppies for about 5 years 😱 hopefully not that long, but they are definitely big babies...
Good Luck with your Reggie, we'll make it eventually!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
IMO set your boundaries. Be flexible where it makes sense and don’t ever dominate or use tactics that would break their spirit. At the same time consequences are important for misbehavior. What those consequences are is open to internet debate.

With proper exercise off leash time I can work for hours at home while our 7 mos girl relaxes with me or downstairs on the couch. Don’t make the mistake that it is a behavioral problem at first before considering if the dog has had its mental/physical exercise. Many times both happen at the same time.
This is such good advice Dan, thank you so much.
 

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I agree that at the heart of it, he's your dog & what you want from him will determine how you treat him. On the couch or not, needing to heel on walks or not, etc etc.

But there's one thing that your instinct must not control & that is physical correction. His misbehaving may cause you to be furious with him & the instinctive reaction to that is to hit him. It's the classic dog training technique - smack him with a rolled up newspaper. No, no, no!! Never, never hit him, as angry as you might be. You probably know this, but it's worth repeating - one can create a life-long fear in them (as our Daisy's first owner did, to our dismay:().
 

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Agree with Bob , while I speak of consequences , violence and hitting are never an option. Think Things like a water squirt bottle squirt to the face while saying “no”, etc for those really bad behaviors. Not just normal puppy antics. Some use a gentle but firm squish of the muzzle with a hand saying “no” etc. just enough feedback to get the point across.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Agree with Bob , while I speak of consequences , violence and hitting are never an option. Think Things like a water squirt bottle squirt to the face while saying “no”, etc for those really bad behaviors. Not just normal puppy antics. Some use a gentle but firm squish of the muzzle with a hand saying “no” etc. just enough feedback to get the point across.
Agreed, Bob and Dan. And that instinctive reaction can be a struggle to resist, especially if you've seen this kind of punishment-based training routinely applied on dogs, growing up. Thankfully, Pacifico hates water, so he tends to get the message if I use the plant mister on him ;)
 
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