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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,

my name is Tyler and my companions name Is Lincoln.
I am looking for advice to prolong the longevity and happiness of my dog.
He is currently 10 months old, and on a diet comprised of boiled chicken and
Water Dog Sky Carnivore Dog breed

open farm beef. Roughly I was told grain free diets contribute to heart issues.
I live in New Hampshire and am not very busy therefore I spend the vast majority of time with him. He is very well behaved, non destructive and happy and healthy. I am also intending to source a female vizsla from Hungary, so if anyone has gone through that process I would appreciate any advice possible.

Love him very much, thank you everyone who responds in advance. I appreciate your time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Also if anyone has an opinion on neutering as well, I would very much not like to do that to him, as I view that action as morally questionable, and think there is a cult of neutering here in the states.
 

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G'Morning Tyler and Lincoln... Welcome to the forum!

When bringing Aly into my life when she was 8 weeks old (now, nearly 18 months old), I found there to be endless opinions of what feeding regime was best. Too many to be extreme views, in my opinion. Therefore, I've applied what I'd consider a common sense approach.

First, I believe dogs to be omnivores.

Aly's base food(s) are a high quality grain free dry kibble. Brands and flavors change, partially to help preventing her from getting bored of the same food. This base food is to best ensure she gets proper vitamins and minerals. The changing of this base food is also an attempt at varying the constituent sources of the vitamins and minerals.

As a topper, mixed into her kibble, she nearly always gets something else... and it ranges from across the food spectrum (first ensuring whatever I give her is not harmful to her). Vegetables, eggs, chicken, beef, pork, fruits, rices... etc, etc. She loves the variety!

Just like in us, humans... indulging in tasty things that aren't the best for us if consumed to the extreme, are just fine if consumed in a measured fashion. It is my job to ensure the measure for Aly.

Aly has a stomach of iron and I partially attribute this to her varied diet.

As it relates to Aly's longevity, I do my very best to ensure she is healthy today, tomorrow, next week and next month. From there, I leave it to fate. There are so many variables which dictate the length of life of any animal (including ourselves and our dogs).

These are just my opinions and are happy for them. Aly is a super healthy and happy mutt... just as you've described your Lincoln.

Cheers!

Dog Car Ear Carnivore Dog breed
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
G'Morning Tyler and Lincoln... Welcome to the forum!

When bringing Aly into my life when she was 8 weeks old (now, nearly 18 months old), I found there to be endless opinions of what feeding regime was best. Too many to be extreme views, in my opinion. Therefore, I've applied what I'd consider a common sense approach.

First, I believe dogs to be omnivores.

Aly's base food(s) are a high quality grain free dry kibble. Brands and flavors change, partially to help preventing her from getting bored of the same food. This base food is to best ensure she gets proper vitamins and minerals. The changing of this base food is also an attempt at varying the constituent sources of the vitamins and minerals.

As a topper, mixed into her kibble, she nearly always gets something else... and it ranges from across the food spectrum (first ensuring whatever I give her is not harmful to her). Vegetables, eggs, chicken, beef, pork, fruits, rices... etc, etc. She loves the variety!

Just like in us, humans... indulging in tasty things that aren't the best for us if consumed to the extreme, are just fine if consumed in a measured fashion. It is my job to ensure the measure for Aly.

Aly has a stomach of iron and I partially attribute this to her varied diet.

As it relates to Aly's longevity, I do my very best to ensure she is healthy today, tomorrow, next week and next month. From there, I leave it to fate. There are so many variables which dictate the length of life of any animal (including ourselves and our dogs).

These are just my opinions and are happy for them. Aly is a super healthy and happy mutt... just as you've described your Lincoln.

Cheers!

View attachment 104274
Thank you for your input, I appreciate your time. Aly is absolutely beautiful.
 

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On the neutering.

Our first male male was a horny S.O.B.
We had decided to wait 2 years before we did the procedure. Ended up needing a surgery at 19 months so we did it then.

Made a big difference. Not Mr. Humpy anymore and a little calmer.

Our current male is sneaking up on 2 and we can not decide what to do. He is not a humper, and already calmer than our first. We are trying to decide but leaning towards not.

But whatever wait 2 years for full development of body/muscle.
 

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My 2 cents.
Avoid grain-free foods with legumes such as lentils or peas, there have been links with health problems associated with them. There is nothing wrong with dry food containing grains provided there is also plenty of quality protein and other ingredients. Dogs evolved along-side humans for thousands of years eating our scraps. They have evolved to become capable omnivores. I'd feed whatever is nutritious and healthy for the dog and makes you feel good as well. You'll get a million opinions on what that is so it's really up to you and your research.

For spay/neuter we are waiting till 2 years at least to decide.
 

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Learn to hunt and don't neuter him

I've heard bad things about importing dogs from Hungary sight unseen. You will likely get the last pick of the litter that way. There really is no reason to import a dog so far away. You can find nice V's close to where you live most likely, even ones from Hungarian stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Learn to hunt and don't neuter him

I've heard bad things about importing dogs from Hungary sight unseen. You will likely get the last pick of the litter that way. There really is no reason to import a dog so far away. You can find nice V's close to where you live most likely, even ones from Hungarian stock.
I agree. I am one hundred percent not going to neuter him. Thankfully I have a high tolerance for shenanigans with him so I believe I can handle it.

I also dislike the appearance of a "cult" of neutering here in the United States, it seems as if people want nothing more than to disfigure their animals as a means of superior control.

It probably is a better idea to find a female Vizsla from a reputable breeder in the US. Wishful thinking I suppose.
 

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Our Wilson was intact until he died at 9 from prostate cancer. We never had any behavior issues or problems.

I have a friend who had a vizsla from Hungary but she was living there at the time and got to pick. I wouldn’t pick sight unseen without a relationship with the breeder
 

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I agree. I am one hundred percent not going to neuter him. Thankfully I have a high tolerance for shenanigans with him so I believe I can handle it.

I also dislike the appearance of a "cult" of neutering here in the United States, it seems as if people want nothing more than to disfigure their animals as a means of superior control.

It probably is a better idea to find a female Vizsla from a reputable breeder in the US. Wishful thinking I suppose.
Let me know if you need help finding a pup and I would guess there won't be too many shenanigans with having an intact dog... at least no more shenanigans than if you neutered him
 
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