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Hi There,

My ten week old pup likes to go on the leash but not too far. He is great on the way away from the house or car for a block or two but then he wants to go back. I read not to push them to far from their instinct to stay close to home so that is fine. The problem is on the way back he high tails it as fast as he can because he is anxious to get back to safety. This means he pulls on the leash all the way home. How do I prevent this from becoming a bad pulling habit. The leash is nice and loose and relaxed on the way out.

Thanks for your advice,
 

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buntingjen

I think you're trying to get a little too far ahead.
At 10 weeks old if you're making it a block or two, that's pretty good. But you may end up pushing him too much, too early, which can make him flat/stale later on.

As for the pulling, you definitely want to get on top of that as soon as possible, but at 10 weeks old he's not ready yet for you to "be on top of it".
One thing you may want to consider is to go a 1/2 block in each direction, and bring him past the house/apartment. When he starts to pull for the door, gently pick him up and give him lots attentin and carry him away from the door, and then start him off again.
Your success will be measured in one or two steps, or successful attempts. Take them when you get them, and give him lots of praise for each step, literally, he does correctly.
You are quite a few months away from any sort of physical disciplinary correction. But with a lot of gentle persuasion and short duration sessions that don't overwhelm him you can establish the behavior early on, which will make it a lot easier to correct and fine tune in 6-8 months.

The foundation you're laying now is for the work you want to begin doing in 6 months, and finishing up in 18 months. That really is how far ahead I look when training. My philosophy is that I'm training today, for a point 6 months in the future.
Make yourself the "most fun" portion of his life right now.
 

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Thank you. I was wondering if it was too soon for a big walk. He is such a big dog (18 lbs already) that it seems physically he needs the exercise. Also, I want to tire him out so that he's not into everything at home. Any suggestions for puppy games? He loves the stuffed toy on the end of the stick chase.

Thank you!!!!
 

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Wow! 18 Lbs! Empty water bottles! Hide and seek with hot dog pieces. Fetch in a hallway. Heel training - let him follow your left hand, down by your keen with some treats (cheese pieces) in your hand. Play leave it -> open hand with treat in front of him while he is sitting. If he goes for the treat before you say the magic word (mine is OK), the hand will close and no treat. So open the hand again (after he sits) and say "leave it", "Leaaave it"...when he hesitates say "OK" let him eat the treat and reward him! ;D Once he understands "leave it" you can use that for when he starts his nipping phase. This way your pant will not get ripped up :)
 

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As Linescreamer stated, anything and everything, to get their mind engaged and working.
"You/We" cannot physically tire out a Vizsla. They will do it themselves, but we humans are woefully inferior physically to stand much of a chance at it once they get more than a few months old.

The stuffed toy on a string game is good, but I'll warn you that it will end very soon here. Vizslas are terrific problem solvers, and he will quickly realize that he needs to stop the other end of the string, the stick, to get the toy.
When doing the "wing on a string" with mine. They have all stopped going for the wing, and went for the tip of the stick, to stop the wing, eventually.
 

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Indeed, we tried the stick thing as well, worked very well for 30 minutes.
I would not try to educate any dog before 14 weeks. It is futile and just frustrates them especially if they see you withholding food.

The best game we played was placing small pieces of food in front of him, to his side, behind a small object in front of him.
Oh, and teaching them bite inhibition to later develop a soft mouth is also very helpful at this stage.

But after 14 weeks things were different. Sam's attention span doubled and started to cooperate.
 
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