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My pup is coming home in about 4 weeks, and I'm finalizing my material gathering and training plan (which I'm prepared to not suit my pup at all and have to rethink!)

I'm following Dr Dunbar's basic outline from Dog Start Daily and Top Dog Academy.

First, has anyone followed the "errorless" crate/potty training? The basic principle is you put them in their crate for an hour, followed by outside to potty, a play training session, return to crate, and repeat. Do you think this will encourage too much day sleeping, and keep him up at night? How long did you guys play and train before returning to crate? How many days or weeks did you follow this schedule?

Second, I want to be well stocked on Kong's and simliar puzzle/treat dispensing chews. What size kongs did your pups use at 8 weeks? I hope to have something engaging in his carrier on our 2 hour flight home from the breeder's. 12 weeks? 4 months? 5? I also hope to be well stocked with kongs throughout their intial growth, with spares of whatever their current size is so I can have ones pre-filled and ready to be used quickly if need be. What are your favorite models or alternate brands?

Lastly, I also want to have a playpen to either section off no-go areas or contain to one play area. How high should they be? I don't foresee needing them past the 6 month mark.
 

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Did you get the binkie? I was thinking about trying to attach that to the crate, to promote voluntary crate time. You got the large for a very young pup? Could they chew it effectively?

I'm, at the suggestion of a breeder and texasred on here, making a specific extra effort to get him comfortable with the crate and intentional alone time. I'm home almost 24/7 at the moment. Don't want him developing separation anxiety!
 

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I personally have not used Dunbar's method, but if it is known to be successful, it's worth a try. I don't try to put them on a rigid schedule. I just watch them like a hawk for the first week, or so. If they're not actively engaged in playing, eating, or sleeping, they're getting ready to go to the bathroom.
Puppies will sleep when they need to sleep, and they should be sleeping 14+ hours in a 24 hour period. Trying to encourage, or discourage, sleeping during specific periods of time, might be detrimental for a young puppy. Maybe when they get older, but as an 8 week old, I let them sleep when they want to sleep, and make sure they have adequate quiet time to sleep.
Play with your puppy a lot. Every play opportunity, is a training opportunity. Not formal leash training or anything like that, but games that incorporate behaviors that down the line you will desire. The simple game of "fetch" involves so many desired behaviors down the line that can be introduced in a fun, positive, bonding, manner.
Don't try and make a schedule, just try and spend a lot of quality time with him in the beginning. The first 6 weeks, weeks 8-14, are critical to proper development. Make the time investment during this period and you will be rewarded.
This might sound stupid, or controlling, but have a plan for your puppy. What are you ultimately trying to achieve? and what is the timeline? What will this puppy's "job" be in one year, two years? Train with a plan, both short term, and long term. There are so many disciplines that Vizlsas excel in. Hunting, agility, obedience, dock diving, search and rescue, etc.
Designating a space for a puppy is not a bad idea. Fortunately my experience has been that Vizslas are respective of barriers and don't challenge them. This is a good thing, because by the time your puppy is 6 months old, it'll be able to clear 4' easily. Finn, my dog, at 8 months, could easily jump into the bed of the pickup truck, but respects a barrier without challenge of just 24" in the house.
Mostly, respect the dog that your puppy will become. If you're not familiar with Vizsla just yet, these are very, very, athletic dogs. They are special amongst dogs, and they are very fast! Sometimes unnervingly fast.
They are also smart, and adept at problem solving and they are not stupid. They will figure out a way to win given time.
As for the Kong questions, just be prepared to have lots of toys. Make sure to have just some bones, or antlers. They need these to clean their teeth, and as adult teeth come in, to get rid of the puppy teeth.
Get ready for a lot of fun.
 

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Did you get the binkie? I was thinking about trying to attach that to the crate, to promote voluntary crate time. You got the large for a very young pup? Could they chew it effectively?
I did not get the binkie. My pup was able to chew on the large Kong, but his primary interest was in getting the goodies I stuffed it with.

There were two things that were very helpful in crate training my pup. His breeder provided me a small pet blanket that his mother had slept on. I simply laid it on to of his bedding. If you can arrange for your breeder to do this I think your pup will find it comforting. The other thing I got him was a microwave heating pad. I would slip it under his mother's blanket and it would stay warm all night.

 
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