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Is it hard for him to have good traction, on most of your floors?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is it hard for him to have good traction, on most of your floors?
We definitely have tile and hard wood throughout the house. I can literally watch his hind legs slip out from under him slowly while he is sitting on those floors. And I think that is how I noticed it first. But now he is sitting the same way in the grass outside and everywhere really. I just wasn’t sure if it could be a hip issue of some sort? Or perhaps I’m totally over reacting like usual 🙂
 

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Hmm... vizslas definitely get into some weird positions, but I agree with your concern that this could be a hip or even knee issue. Have you noticed anything off about his gait?
 

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I would put down a lot of rugs.
If you have stairs, keep him off of them. This is the the same advice I would give to anyone with a puppy.
I would do the wait and see approach on hips. Growth plates are still open, and I doubt x-rays would show very much. The only thing that might show under sedation, is if there is laxity, but even pennhip will not evaluate at that age. Hopefully with different surfaces, it will improve.
Keep a close eye on his gait, at a walk, and when he's running.

As far as the grass photo.
Some dogs will sit lazy, if they have been sitting for a little bit. Is his sit always like that, or does that happen after a little bit?
 

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I will make a separate post later today.
In the Supplements thread, I mention Shine has hip dysplasia.
I don't mind sharing, what I have learned from Orthopedic veterinarians about hip dysplasia in young dogs.
Before anyone asks, both her parents have passed their OFA hip ratings, before being bred.
The contract with her breeder, covers her hips.
 
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If you want to have the pup around you when working in the kitchen, you can also put down a dog bed in a corner and have him sit / lay on that.
According to current stand of science publications any kind of orthopedic issue in a dog has 3 main contributors: inherited genes (it is not just parents, unfortunately it can go back to several generations), food (puppy and parents), exercise as a puppy. Latter one includes also surface and type of exercise, i.e. slippery surface can put lots of pressure on developing joints, just as jumping from higher than knee hight, again if the jump happens on hard surface, even worse.
The grass sitting position is very normal in my experience, but the one on the slippery surface is more alerting and i would make changes regarding the surface. If you put down rugs, make sure it has a non slippery back too. Some of the shammy type ones have that and they are easily washable, not to mention they trap dirt nicely.
 

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The grass position doesn't bother me, but the kitchen floor posture would concern me.
He needs adequate "footing" beneath him to develop properly.
Environment can have a impact on muscular skeletal development.
Tika, my last Vizsla, was basically kenneled for the first twenty two months of her life. Her owner had sadly passed away and, well, the situation was just as it was.
Tika was clumsy her whole life. Nothing wrong with her, but her environment did not allow her to develop the coordination and athletic skill a Vizsla is known for. When I first got her she ran like a puppy, and not as a nearly adult female dog should have.
Correct the environment, and it wouldn't hurt to have the Vet give the once over.
 
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