Hungarian Vizsla Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello and thank you in advance for your input!

We have a 5.5 month female V and a (much) older, rescue male (likely Lab X Boxer) who is neutered (we don't know how old he was when fixed, however). He is an amazing boy, but already shows mounting behaviors when their play becomes very boisterous. We often get told that is just our male dominating - it is not (just trust us on this!). We had hoped the breeder would give us a male V so we would not need to worry about this issue, but we landed a female instead. Our breeder does not seem to think we will have any issues but we are deeply concerned (please note: the breeder has no experience with males/females in the same household); concerned to the point where we wonder if we need to return her to the breeder. We know that early spaying will risk her health, so that is off the table. Boarding our boy is also not an option (due to his age and separation issues). ACK! If anyone has words of wisdom for us, we would be incredibly grateful. Thank you!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,878 Posts
Not uncommon for dogs to try humping another dog, when they get excited during play. Males, females, spayed, neutered it really does not matter. Age does not even matter to some.
Some dogs will correct the offending dog, others will not. As a owner of a puppy, you need to step in, and let him know it’s not acceptable. You can use Leave it, or whatever command you use when you want him to stop doing something.
She will have to be separated from him during the heat cycle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for taking the time to respond - we are grateful! Yes, we stop him immediately and he responds well (he is a gem of a dog, no question). Yes, we are also aware that they must not be together during her cycle. Our question is to those who have experience with an intact female and a neutered male in the same household and if it is possible without driving the male wild (even though he is older and neutered). We are concerned it will be very stressful on him to be aware (scent-wise) of a female in cycle, in such close proximity.

Thank you again for your input!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,878 Posts
Until Shine was 2 1/2 years old, she was intact.
She was raised with a senior neutered male Vizsla. When he passed away, I took in 2 male neutered Vizsla‘s that were around five, and six years old. No, it does not rule the neutered males world. Yes, it does make them frisky, and if given the chance they will do everything that a non-neutered male would do. Especially when the female becomes receptive, during that part of the heat cycle. She will seek out your male, and try to entice him. Truthfully they will seek out any dog whether they’re male or female. It’s just what nature is telling them to do.

Before that I owned 3 intact Vizslas, two females and one male. The male was neutered at 3 years old, and it was years later before the females were spayed.
Once neutered, it did cut down on his drive to be a pest while they were in heat. It does not totally take the urge away,
This is has just been my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,639 Posts
Males will mount males, females will mount females, and every combination of neutered and spayed that can be fit in. At the end of the day, they're dogs. We wold like them to have polite social manners consistent with human behaviors, but that just is never going to happen.
Do you continue to let the male try and mount your female? Absolutely not. You get on him every time he even looks like he is going to start. He can learn to be a good boy, or at least a good boy when you're looking. You will not psychologically damage him by correcting him and stopping the behavior. You're in charge.
My biggest concern right now, outside of the behavior itself, is that he is just to big and strong for a 5 1/2 month old female puppy. Once she gets bigger and stronger she can "deal with it". Right now though, no. It's up to you to stop it.
I personally would be looking into an ecollar for correction. You will never stop the behavior, as it it is just to deeply imprinted into their genetic instincts, but you can arrest the behavior when it starts.
I wouldn't send her back. Get her through to adulthood, and you will probably find that they become very close companions when things even out.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,878 Posts
The only thing I would add to gunnr’s ecollar suggestion. You have to teach a command first, without the E collar. The dog has to clearly know the command, and has been able to complete it multiple times. Where it becomes second nature to the dog. You say the command the dog and follows through. Then you overlap that training with the ecollar. If not done this way a dog can think the pressure from the E collar is coming from the other dog. That can lead to a lot of unneeded problems. Especially when it comes to a dog with anxiety problems. I would probably teach the command, and overlap the training with a spray water bottle. It’s a lot less pressure on an anxiety dog. Leave it is a good command for these type of things, as a lot of dogs already know that command.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gabica

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you - both! - for the continuing conversation! We really cannot express how grateful we are to learn from your experience. I can 100% put everyone's concerns to rest that we DO stop Bo (our Lab X Boxer) from mounting - he has never "landed" a mount - the moment it even remotely looks like he has that idea, we intervene. He is VERY easily corrected - he is a STELLAR boy; he wants nothing more than to please! She (Junebug) has never been hurt by him. That is the very good news! Truly - she is the alpha (even at her incredibly young age - she is THE most strong-willed, young V. I have ever encountered! The breeder's description of her, from the earliest age, was "BOLD!") and he is very, VERY omega! It is him we are thinking about with concern over her cycles - we know we can keep them separated but are worried that having a cycling female in such close proximity may be too big of an "ask" (of him, mentally!). Thank you for being so patient with my continued inquiries - we are finding ourselves in unknown territory (clearly!) and want to do the best for all pups involved!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,878 Posts
Hopefully you will stay a member, and post lovely stories of them. We also love pictures too.

Not uncommon for the females to rule the males.
Shine is a lot younger than Hunter, and Jasper. They still let her be boss 99% of the time.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top