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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I've been reading these forums for the past few weeks and they're so much better than many 'highly recommended' books.

We just got our new V puppy, Peanut, he turns 9 weeks old today. He's been with us for over a week, and he has a crate (mostly happy with it, even manages 5 (!!) hours of uninterrupted sleep in it), with a playpen attached to it. These are his main areas when he's resting or on his own.

The rest of the time he's spending exploring the garden which he can access directly from the playpen (when we allow it, of course. For now, no leash as he hates it and no parks (except short 'rucksack walks') as he's mid-way through his vaccinations.

But my main question is: when should we introduce the rest of the house? He knows it's there, and he managed to escape a few times to explore it for a couple of minutes. We've heard conflicting opinions on this (ranging from 'crate/pen only for the first few months' to 'just let them explore everything').

How have you approached the subject?

Thanks
 

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I keep mine more in the main living areas, when out. That way I can have eyes on them, and redirect them away from things I’d rather them not have. They do get to go in other rooms with me. If I can’t watch them, it’s back to the crate.
As far as the leash goes, just let him drag a short around when your playing with him. He will get use to it, and then you can start letting him learn some leash pressure.
 

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Finn is not allowed upstairs, the bedrooms, or in the basement where the cats are fed, and their litter box is located. The rest of the house has been his to explore and occupy since day one.
 

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I have read somewhere earlier on that any parts of the house you want them to be around later on is advisable to learn as part of the potty training process. that way it will be within that magical circle they have learned not to potty in. when they were puppies I had a baby gate between my first and second floor and they were generally not allowed to be out of sight. I gradually started introducing them to the second floor and other rooms, one room at a time and making sure it was right after potty break. my dogs are now adults and allowed to go everywhere in the house except the pantry where I store food, garbage can and certain unavoidable chemicals. So that door is ALWAYS closed even when I go to get something from there.
 

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@ 9 weeks old, Aly went where ever I went in the house. She was never unattended... and dragged around a 3 foot straight lead.

95% of the time, we remained in the living room and attached kitchen... though, she certainly was allowed to explore the rest of the house when I ventured through it. My house is pretty small. About 1400 sq/ft... so exploration wasn't too overwhelming for her. If I had a huge house, I'd probably have been more limiting.

Most important to me was Aly's confidence as she explored. Oh... and her understanding and progress towards being "potty trained"!

In the end, it all worked out AWESOMELY!

Best of luck!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@ 9 weeks old, Aly went where ever I went in the house. She was never unattended... and dragged around a 3 foot straight lead.

95% of the time, we remained in the living room and attached kitchen... though, she certainly was allowed to explore the rest of the house when I ventured through it. My house is pretty small. About 1400 sq/ft... so exploration wasn't too overwhelming for her. If I had a huge house, I'd probably have been more limiting.

Most important to me was Aly's confidence as she explored. Oh... and her understanding and progress towards being "potty trained"!

In the end, it all worked out AWESOMELY!

Best of luck!!!
Thank you, I might start getting him used to the lead and to following me around. I do want him to be confident and respectful at the same time, but I guess it takes time :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all, so the consensus seems to be it's better to let him explore (while still keeping an eye on him) and let him drag a lead as he does so.
Uncharted territory, but I guess you need to be brave at some point :)
 

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Thank you, I might start getting him used to the lead and to following me around. I do want him to be confident and respectful at the same time, but I guess it takes time :)
I used a 3ft piece of light rope. made a small loop on one end. The other end, just a small knot so the rope wouldn't unravel. Then, just looped the rope through itself, over the d-ring on her collar.

When ya wake up in the morning, just put the lead on him. He may fuss about it for a few minutes. My bet, within a short time, he'll be dragging it around and not know it's there.

The short, straight lead on Peanut at this time is almost entirely for YOUR benefit. With no loop or handle on the far end, it can't get caught on something as Peanut is dragging it around and exploring. Where it becomes a tool for you, is when you NEED to catch him.

If he gets into something or begins to have a potty accident, your first reaction will be to go grab him. Very shortly, you're going to find that your lunge towards him will cause him to dart away from you. This is a natural reflex reaction. The lead gives you a better chance of catching him.😂🤣
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I used a 3ft piece of light rope. made a small loop on one end. The other end, just a small knot so the rope wouldn't unravel. Then, just looped the rope through itself, over the d-ring on her collar.

When ya wake up in the morning, just put the lead on him. He may fuss about it for a few minutes. My bet, within a short time, he'll be dragging it around and not know it's there.

The short, straight lead on Peanut at this time is almost entirely for YOUR benefit. With no loop or handle on the far end, it can't get caught on something as Peanut is dragging it around and exploring. Where it becomes a tool for you, is when you NEED to catch him.

If he gets into something or begins to have a potty accident, your first reaction will be to go grab him. Very shortly, you're going to find that your lunge towards him will cause him to dart away from you. This is a natural reflex reaction. The lead gives you a better chance of catching him.😂🤣
That's excellent advice, thanks. I just bought a thin, lightweight nylon leash to use as his house line, will introduce it to him today, I'm not expecting miracles, but as you say, hopefully soon he'll learn to live with it.
 

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We didn't restrict Ellie in puppyhood, but she needed an adult wherever she was. Nice thing about pups is that they want to stay where you are anyway. If we couldn't devote attention, it was crate/nap time. When we ate dinner she was in a cage pen next to our dining room table. To this day we crate her when we eat dinner so we don't have to deal with puppy-eye begging or causing trouble for attention while we eat. She just goes in and naps while we eat as its so programmed now.

edit : we never allowed her on beds, and still to this day don't. We made that decision from day one. Best to set boundaries as early as possible, like no upstairs, beds, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Dan, we started doing the same, crate whenever we’re unable to give him attention and whenever we eat.

we’ve also started allowing him to explore the ground floor with us, other floors are still off limits.
 
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