Hungarian Vizsla Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI All, me again.

I am just wodnering how one helps a puppy to sleep. Ours seems incapable of realised she needs to sleep alot and will keep going and going.

We mostly try to sit with her after putting in her crate until she drifts off. However this isnt always forth coming and somethings screams blue murder before calming down (almost always takes 20mins).

So, is it ok to leave her (Ziva) to cry it out, or should we wait until she falls sleep on us/on sofa (IF she decides to fall asleep)?

Or is there some trick we are missing?

Worth noting that at night time when us humans want to sleep, she is usually pretty sleepy and goes straight down in her crate without any fuss at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
one of mine has always liked the crate covered. kind of creating the illusion that it is night time.
Yea we do that, I guess i was more after, at what point is it reasonable to expect her to take herself of somewhere (doesnt have to be her crate - though would be good if it were, given we'd want to leave her to it whilst we work) and put her self down for a nap rather than us managing her naps throughout the day?

Or how do we help her learn this ability?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,377 Posts
That could be a long time, before that’s a norm.
They are more likely to get into things they shouldn’t, instead of calmly going to sleep on their own.
Heifer has fallen asleep next to me, on the sofa a couple of times with one of her chews. Most of the time if I haven’t crated her for a nap, she turns into the Tasmanian devil. Zipping though the house, and trying to nip anything/anyone she comes into contact with. It’s a sign of a tired puppy, and I crate her. She’s about a month older than your pup. I don’t expect her to be left alone uncrated for years. Some these dogs can never be left uncrated. They are prone to get into something they shouldn’t, or you come home to a sofa that’s demolished.
High energy dogs, do high energy things.
Shine will leap up on the dining room table, for a better view of me mowing the back yard. She will be 5 years old in February.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,377 Posts
Let them cry it out. They’ll get tired and pass out. The longer you wait to do it, the harder it’ll be. If you give in, they’ll learn to cry for at least that long.
I will let them cry to a certain point, but would not let it go on indefinitely. You can normally find that point, where they stop for a very short time. That is the time to reward them for being quite. Then you can build on it, and they gain a understanding of what sets them free.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DrogoNevets

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi All,
So we are trialling a stricter routine with her where we will let her cry it out to a point. She always seems to fall asleep within 20mins (max) so we've said over 30mins we will go to her.

My next question around sleep is, we all know puppies need a lot of sleep etc. So the routine we are trialling for most days (it doesnt work perfectly for our week) when do we start letting it slip. EG i would hope that there will be a point where we no longer have to manage her sleep for her but she will get used to going to sleep of her own accord. Do adults need 18-20hrs sleep a day still? If not this routine isnt going to work for her ad infinitum, and we will need to adjust. But when?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,377 Posts
The staying awake longer does not happen all at once, it’s slow adjustment. Heifer already has longer awake periods at 3 1/2 months, than she did at 8 weeks. It will keep adjusting until she’s a adult, and we find a rhythm that works for her and us.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DrogoNevets

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The staying awake longer does not happen all at once, it’s slow adjustment. Heifer already has longer awake periods at 3 1/2 months, than she did at 8 weeks. It will keep adjusting until she’s a adult, and we find a rhythm that works for her and us.
At what point would you consider her an adult? I am assuming 2-3 years? Again I am begining to realise any expectations I had for Ziva are wildly out, (in all directions)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,377 Posts
Lol , Sorry for using the word adult very loosely. I should have put after they are out of the puppy stage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DrogoNevets

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So back to the sleep topic. How do we get her to recognise she is tired, and go to sleep (on us is fine).

At present she only sleeps when we put her into the crate and shut her in. The crying since first posting has calmed down a lot, and never lasts more than 5 mins (touch wood) unless its in in the middle of a sleep, at which point its out for toilet on leash with no interaction other than the "toilet" command to encourage her. So she can sleep (albeit lightly and we cant move around the house much).

But the killer for me is the evening, when we put her down at 20.00ish and have to retreat to our bedroom so we can chat etc with out her staying awake.

This isnt as bad as it sounds as we have a huge main bedroom with sofa etc, but I feel we should be able to use the living room with her asleep in it. But she just wont sleep unless alone in her crate.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,377 Posts
How long is she out of the crate each time?
You might be crating her before she is tired.
I would not try to make the room totally quite, while she is crated. I would do things I normally do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Oscar never knew he was tired, we had to tell him.
Putting him in the crate then covering him with his fur blankie was the signal.
Same during the night if he stirred but didn’t need out, sometimes he was maybe just cold so a wee cuddle and tucked in then he went back to sleep.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top