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Hi Everyone!

Just a while ago I got rejected by a Vizsla breeder after filling out my puppy application last night.

According to them, the reasons were:

You will be hard pressed to find a breeder who does not crop a vizsla tail (2/3rds crop, as called for in the breed standard). This is done for safety, not only cosmetics, as a vizsla tail becomes thin and breakable in the distal third. For an active breed, such as the vizsla, this becomes a liability when hunting or running in the woods. Vizsla puppies also have their dew claws removed for the same reason.

Vizslas are a soft breed, who do well with positive training. Ceasar Milan's methods will not work well with a vizsla. They are also a breed that needs 30-45 minutes of off leash exercise daily, as they are bred to hunt all day long. They are a very "velcro" dog, and they do not do well left alone for long periods of time.
As you know from your research, the vizsla breed is not for everyone. Based on the answers to your questionnaire, and your emails, I sincerely believe that you should research another breed as a companion animal. I'm sorry that we cannot help you further


I questioned if the breeder docks the Vizsla puppy's tail and cropped their ears because I do not its tail to be docked and its ears to be cropped. I can understand the dew claws. I guess I just didn't want my puppy to start looking like a Doberman.

I work from 7AM to 5pm. I thought I could wake up early at 5AM to take the puppy for a walk and play with it before going to work at 6:30. Then stop by at 11AM since I have an hour lunch and I'm 10 minutes from work. I get home at 5PM and thought I could bring the puppy for a hike or at the park. I did understand Vizsla is a velcro breed, but I feel like the breeder wants someone to be home all day. I don't understand that because who is going to pay the bills, and take care their family pet? I understand that the Vizsla needs a free run hence why I suggested the hike, dog park, and tennis court.

I'm a single 27 year old with a very well paying job and I have my own house. I am not a hunter. I did start my puppy savings 2 years ago and was ready to commit to my future furry companion until its old age. This will be my first pet. I have spent times with Purebred German Shepherds and Labs, but their energy is not the same as mine. I usually go for a hike about 2 hours. Oh I forgot the Caesar Milan's methods, I thought was to be calm and assertive. I understand it's important to do positive reinforcement. I felt like she thought I would abuse the puppy when I mentioned Caesar Milan.

Do I need have someone to dogsit the puppy during the day instead of coming home from lunch?

Thanks in advance! I can't think of any other breeds for me beside a Vizsla or a Rhodesian Ridgeback.
 

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I've never heard of that before, but apparently it happens.

Have you considered adopting a Vizsla from a rescue group or the "dog pound"? They are generally just delighted to find a home for their dogs. My boy Willie was a lost dog, picked up by Animal Control. He was about 1-1/2 or 2 years old when I adopted him. He came into my home fully house-trained and already having great house manners. No jumping up on people, no begging at the table, etc. For a person such as yourself, who works full time, a pretrained dog could be a huge advantage.

Also, I've had no problem with bonding. He knows I'm the one who got him out of jail! I've had him for seven years now, and we are tightly bonded. I'm pretty sure Willie loves me like crazy. Well, it's just a thought. In order to find a purebred Vizsla in the dog pound or in rescue, you have to stick with it... but it does happen, if you keep looking!

p.s. It is very gratifying to save a life.
 

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Welcome Explorer,

mswhipple has hit the nail on the head, especially for your full time working needs. A Puppy, especially a Vizsla puppy is a 24/7 full time requirement
for the first several months. The only break you get from their constant needs is when they are asleep between food, potty, play, training, and more potty. As babies (first 3 months at least) They cannot reside in a crate for hours... They will not learn basics, and it will be pure torture for them and you.

I know you want to love your new pet, be sure you get off to a comfortable start... Puppies are exactly like having a human baby... feeding, diapers, crying, multiple needs become terribly time consuming, and frustrating. Especially when it cuts into your sleep, your relaxation, or stresses you because you don't have time for them.
The right dog can be a perfect fit !!
 

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Yes a breeder can turn you down if they feel you are not a good fit. You want a undocked tail. She docks tails. Thats enough for one to say no. A good breeder will not change what they feel right, just to sell a pup.
 
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To me, it sounds like your life is suitable for a Vizsla. Sometimes breeders are very protective of their dogs and have one reason or other to decline your application.

As tkna states as a puppy, a vizsla is a ton of work so expect to take some time off work or have other means to take the dog for a potty every couple of hours til they are 6 months or so.

Keep looking for a breeder in line with your values. You'll find one, it will just take some work.

I'm a 31 year old single male and couldn't imagine my life without Viszlas in it. I work full time and live alone as well. It is a major responsibility and effort though. Be prepared for all your time outside of work to be dedicated to your dog.

I know of many other young, busy people who have raised vizslas. It just takes commitment, routine and willingness to make sacrifices for your dog.

Where are you located?

You should be less concerned about a docked tail. No legitimate vizsla breeder will ever crop their dogs ears but you are extremely unlikely to find an undocked vizsla outside of Europe.
 

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I'll give you my take on the breeder's response, but please take this constructively.

No one crops vizsla ears, so if I were a breeder and got a question about that it might indicate to me that the person had not done sufficient research. Tail docking is a hot button issue that I happily remain on the fence about. :) Having a different value on that issue than the breeder could be taken as a criticism of their choice to dock and even if it doesn't it is just a mismatch. This isn't a simple transaction, as I'm sure you're aware, so it's important to find a good fit personality and value wise as you enter into a long-term relationship with this breeder. I'm sure you can find a breeder that doesn't dock, but I would warn you from making that such a high priority on your list that you might overlook health clearances, good temperament fit, etc.

Mentioning Cesar Milan would also be a red flag for me. I like that he is aware of his energy and how that affects the dog, but overall his methods are too heavy handed and based in dominance theory, which doesn't give a breed as intelligent and sensitive as this one enough credit. They want to please and if you treat them with respect and love they will give it back 10 fold. He would look at a vizsla leaning against their owner and say it was asserting dominance over the person. If you followed his advice and discouraged that you'd be robbing yourself of a wonderful relationship and more importantly you would be taking away something that is bred into the very being of these creatures. What bothers me most about his methods are when he provokes a dog into reacting in a negative, but natural way and then corrects them into submission. A vizsla will shut down under that kind of pressure. Milan certainly uses some positive methods as well, but that's not what I think of when I hear his name. So we can disagree on whether he's a good trainer, but hopefully that gives you some insight into what the breeder may have been thinking.

I personally think you could make owning a vizsla work with the schedule you mentioned. I am also 27, live 10 minutes from work, and go home mid-work day to hang out with my dog. It works great for my adult, lower energy dog. A puppy however is far more demanding, especially during those first couple months at home. Many people take off a week or two to help transition the puppy and start training off on the right foot. If that's not an option then hiring a dog walker to come and relieve the puppy in the morning and afternoon is definitely something you should consider.

Again, please don't feel defensive reading this. I believe your views are more nuanced than my interpretation is, but it's worth seeing if they came across that way to this breeder. Puppy applications can only give so much information and I'm sure you can appreciate how difficult it is for breeders to make the choices they do.
 

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Wow, I didn't expect to get a lot of responses. Thank you so much for taking the time to respond. I'll respond to each of you so that way it would be easier instead of having so many posts.

@mswhipple

Hi mswhipple! And thank you responding to my original post! Hahaha, I guess I'll be the first then. I had to laugh when you mentioned you got him out of jail. I thought about looking into rescue group or the dog pound, but it appears that they're a lot of Pitbull mixes.

I'm just afraid if I do rescue a Vizsla from a rescue or dog pound that it would think I'm an abusive owner or anyone who comes near it is abusive due to their past. Also, I don’t know if the dog came from a puppy mill. I’m worried about the health risks and the cost if I’m not able to maintain its health.

After hearing your story, how you adopted your furry friend, I thought I'll give that a try and have a little faith that everything will be okay.

@ tknafox2


Hi tknafox2! The reason I wanted was a puppy was so I can train the commands in a different language since my parents and family members do not speak English. After reading mswhipple, I’ll get an adult dog instead since she mentioned that I’ll be saving a life instead. I just have to train the commands in a new language. Also, it’d be ready to go on my hiking adventures to see the waterfall with me. I just hope it knows that I will not hurt it or give up on it like its previous owners is all I asked. Thank you for replying to my post!



@TexasRed

Hi TexasRed! I understand any breeder can reject the puppy application. I just wondering where I went wrong on the application was all. Thank you for replying my post!

@organicthoughts
Hi organicthoughts! I thought the breed would suit my lifestyle or a Rhodesian Ridgeback since I’m an active person.

I understand it takes a lot of work with a puppy. Just thought I would train the commands in a different language. Not only that, I never had a puppy before so I thought I would enjoy the experience of adopting a puppy and watch it grow.

I’m located in Connecticut. I found the breeder that rejected my application through Google. I understand Vizsla breeders don’t cropped the ears but I thought I asked just to be sure they don’t since I don’t personally know the breeders.

I’ll adopt a dog from a shelter or a rescue instead since like mswhipple mentioned, it’s saving a life. After hearing her story, I would give it a try since I’m volunteering at Meriden Humane Society this upcoming Saturday.

@ einspänner

Hi! Oh no worries! LOL I thought I asked since I thought the breeder told me I could ask her any questions. So I thought I could asked, and I felt comfortable talking to her without thinking that me asking her will cause her to think I didn’t do any research.

Yeah, I googled after to see what’s wrong with Caesar Milan’s methods. Boy lots of comments on his methods. I can understand her concerns now after reading. Some of his methods I wouldn’t use. I do agree with positive reinforcement since I’m the same way. LOL

Thank you for explaining in the breeder’s point of view because I got totally confused when she said I could ask her any questions. I thought it would be okay to ask just to be sure, but I know now it wasn’t.
I’ll look into rescues or shelters that have a Vizsla.

Again, thank you all. You helped me clear up wondering if the breed is the right for me after the breeder told me it is not. Who knows, I’ll probably spend at the animal shelter and end up adopting a different breed instead. I’ll give a try to looking into rescues and shelters.
 

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@ tknafox2[/b]
Hi tknafox2! The reason I wanted was a puppy was so I can train the commands in a different language since my parents and family members do not speak English. After reading mswhipple, I’ll get an adult dog instead since she mentioned that I’ll be saving a life instead. I just have to train the commands in a new language.

Vizsla is very intelligent breed! Don't you worry, they are very fast learners. My Vizsla understands commands in three languages. Some of my family members use commands in broken English and my boy seem to understand everyone just fine :)
 

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the_explorer said:
I'm just afraid if I do rescue a Vizsla from a rescue or dog pound that it would think I'm an abusive owner or anyone who comes near it is abusive due to their past. Also, I don’t know if the dog came from a puppy mill. I’m worried about the health risks and the cost if I’m not able to maintain its health.

After hearing your story, how you adopted your furry friend, I thought I'll give that a try and have a little faith that everything will be okay.



My Vizsla was also a recue from the SPCA where I live. I had a previous pound dog (a Shepherd) and wanted another rescue. It took 6 to 8 months of a lot of work to get my dog to get really comfortable with me and my wife. I spent a whole lot of time and training with him every day... but it paid off. I dont think in general rescues assume everyone is out to hurt them, even if they were abused. Within a short time, they realize if you are a loving, caring person things will be getting pretty good for them. It does take a while for them to understand they have a permanent home and also fully bond with you. Im no expert, but thats my take with both my dogs, and many friends who also have rescues.

Im currently looking for another rescue V, well not immediately but hopefully in the near future. I'd rather take a chance on a dog who needs a great home, than assume all pound dogs are trouble waiting to happen (health and/or behavior wise).

Good luck in your search for your dog. :)
 

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You didn't mention why you wanted a Vizsla..what are the reasons and what are you expecting? Your expectations and reasons for the ears and tail are not only a red flag, but also not sensible. There are breed standards of the AKC that breeders follow, these are taken very seriously by them, and your sharing your lack of understanding or appreciation would not only be a red flag for me, but would immediately disqualify you for ownership.


No one likes to be rejected, especially when it's so personal. But, breeders have a responsibility to make sure the placements for their babies are appropriate, the breeder sounds like they're doing due diligence. Your lifestyle DOES sound like it's at best not a good fit, but probably incompatible with a puppy..but especially a Vizsla puppy that requires so much extra attention and work.

I'm also not going to sugar coat the idea of getting an adult Vizsla, either. A Vizsla is a Vizsla, they really do require a lot of emotional attention, time, and exercise, and if you're at work for 8+ hours a day, I don't think the age of the dog is an issue as much as it's basic needs aren't compatible with your lifestyle.

FWIW, I didn't get a Vizlsa until I was part time, and frankly that's not really enough time..for either of us.

Sorry...
 

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You didn't mention why you wanted a Vizsla..what are the reasons and what are you expecting?
I think he did.
I have spent times with Purebred German Shepherds and Labs, but their energy is not the same as mine. I usually go for a hike about 2 hours.
 

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Hi Again

Thank you for your personal attention... very nice!!
Ksana is absolutely correct... this bread is very intelligent, and will pick up your additional languages in a heart beat!! If you actually do adopt a
rescue V... and live with it and grow together as we all do... you might consider a pup as a second Dog in the future... it is very common for Vizsla owners to have multiple dogs... in fact it is almost the normal. Your elder dog will make a wonderful mentor... The pup will learn much faster, and become part of the family faster... they are also easier to raise. ( IMO) My Pup was mentored by a Bloodhound, so he has very strong NOSE abilities, and believe it or not, he is pretty laid back for a Vizsla... :eek:
 

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@tnkafox2

Three languages?! That's quite impressive! Thank you again for letting me know that! I'm not worried at all. Just will take a lot time and effort.

@ajcoholic

Thank you so much for sharing your story! It's very inspirational. I will definitely look into the rescue or shelter.

That was just my worried that a dog would not trust again especially with me since it's been through so much. Hearing from your experience, it gives me hope.

Again, thank you so much.

@Gingerling

Um, I did. I said I wanted a dog that keep up with during hiking and to play sports with. I came across a Vizsla.

That is fine if me asking a stupid question disqualifies me as a potential owner. It's just shows that a breeder may be impatient or lack of compassion to people who are first time owners or need to know more. It kind of reminds me how a student is not doing well in a subject when a teacher teaches and does not offer help to a student who really wants to learn but has trouble understanding. It's okay. Also, the breeder did mention if I had any questions, feel free to ask. So I did. I didn't think it would be a crime to ask or that it would disqualify me. So be it. I just know that I will be responsible enough to take care a dog until its lifetime since I have a financial stability from my job and other investments.

I never said I didn't like to be rejected. I understand now as to why I was rejected when others took the time to explain where I went wrong. I rather know the reasons in a better details so I can learn from it.

My lifestyle for working full-time and doing strenuous activity after work? To tell you the truth, if we were to do a poll who works full-time instead of part-time hours, I bet there are some of us that do full-time hours.

You think a family lifestyle is only good for a puppy or a dog? I disagree. There are some family who give up on a puppy or dog as well and it's not even due to financial reasons. It's due to not having any time and locking the puppy or dog in a crate or living it outside. Mind you, there's more than 1 person being able to take care a puppy or a dog, but somehow they can't?

I know for a fact that you don't think a Vizsla is a right breed for me. It sounds to me you don't think I should own a dog at all because I work full-time when you mentioned that you worked part-time.

@TexasRed

Thank you for helping Gingerling answer the question. I thought I really did mention why I preferred that breed in my original post.

:) I was laughing so hard when you said "I think he did." I forgot my username seems masculine. :] I'm a girl!

@tknafox2

Hi! I just wanted to be sure I talked to everyone whoever posted in my thread.

I'm pretty surprised her dog can learn 3 languages! Quite impressive! So it feels great that I can teach an adult dog a new language.

I do see myself adopting a Vizsla from a rescue or shelter if they're okay with me working full-time but willing to stop during my lunch to take it for a walk and after work for a hike. I don't plan to stay at my job forever since I plan to do more investments in the future.

I would love to get a Vizsla puppy, but seeing how the breeder and Gingerling responded, it appears that my full-time 10 hours work may disqualify me so quickly even if I can afford the puppy or willing to train and take care of it until its old age.

Hahaha I can tell by the picture that your pup is being trained by a Bloodhound.

Thank you all again for responding. I'll look into finding a purebred Vizsla through the recues and shelters. I will update everyone in the future about my future furry companion.
 

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A reputable breeder is not one who is in the business of selling puppies. Her "business" is that of bringing high quality puppies into the world and consequently making sure that they go to the best homes. This breeder will have taken considerable care to find the right father for the pups; will have given the pregnant mother proper (expensive) vet care; and will have gone through 8 weeks of demanding and joyous puppy raising. She will be very attached to her babies, but then has to turn them over to complete strangers. She will be very careful in doing that.

I'm not saying that your breeder was right in rejecting you, I'm just trying to give her side of it.

Regarding rescue: you will be getting a dog that's over its VERY demanding puppy hood; you will probably be saving a life; you might be getting the very best dog that you could ever hope for. Or you might be getting a puppy mill dog whose parents weren't screened for health and/or which wasn't properly socialized. Maybe one bearing emotional scars from abuse. It's unlikely that you will know it's full story.

We have a rescue V - likely from a puppy mill, or casual breeder. Some emotional issues, but not too bad. But we love her and don't regret rescuing her.

We also have a re-homed V - one that was returned to his breeder. Charlie was two when he was returned for biting the owner's child & the child's friend. He is a great dog - friendly, happy, playful (no, he's not a biter).

The returned-to-breeder is the path that I recommend. Mostly because you'll know its background. Dogs are not often returned, but it does happen. (Probably more so for V's because they're so much more demanding than other breeds.) So email all the breeders in your area with a short version of your story and be patient.

Bob
 

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Explorer,
Your initial question was about being rejected by the breeder... Well when we were looking to get our first V, We were not only rejected, we were totally snubbed. I had been searching for breeders in my area, and found one we were only about 2 hrs from. we were going to be in the area, and I contacted said breeder to ask if we could come by and meet the breeding pair. Ha Ha I was informed ... It did not work that way and if we were interested in "Adopting" a Puppy we would need to fill out an application, and be approved. That application was amazing! Anyway, that was my first introduction to the Vizsla family, and now that I have been a mom twice, I understand it. But It was a bit of a surprise to say the least.
Here is a photo of our first baby "Foxy" she was mentored by our beloved Weimaraner Greta. Foxy passed away at 2 1/2 due to terminal illness.
Pearl our Bloodhound with Mr. Ferguson. Pearl is 10 yrs and Fergy is now 2 1/2.

As a footnote, Foxy and Fergy had the same sire, but different mothers.
 

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@ Bob Engelhardt

I understand. I wasn't sure what kind of breeder that I was planning to adopt a Vizsla from. There were no reviews, so it was difficult for me to know whether or not she was a reputable breeder.

That's very true I won't know it's full story when it comes to a rescue. It looks like it's a gamble I will have to take as well.

Thank you for suggesting that dogs may be returned by their breeders. I got a feeling I'll look into the rescue and shelter when it comes to adopting my future furry companion.

@tknafox2

LOL, my breeder was only 20 minutes away from me. Don't get me wrong I had fun completing the puppy application.

Foxy looks so adorable with the frisbee and happy hiking! Now, I want to play frisbe and go for a hike. LOL nice house by the way!
 

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When I first started looking for a vizsla, there were long waiting lists and every breeder had a questionaire that you had to fill out. This was in regards to hobbies, hours that you worked, crating, training and many other things that I can't remember. Once our family met the breeder and saw the parents, we then had to put down a deposit. I did a lot of reading on line and in books. I also learned about the breed from a tv show called Pick a Puppy.
I have had a mixed breed puppy from the pound and she was absolutely wonderful, but not without issues.(Having been put back in the pound at least twice before I got her and abused). A viszla puppy or adult dog is very much not like any other dog my family has ever owned. It is an amazing bond that is very hard to explain. My husband and I were in a serious car accident on the way out to see Dharma when she was 3 weeks old. It was very hard even for both of us to manage this little "wild child", our home and our full time jobs and go to physiotherapy. Dharma is 2 and a half years old now. I can look back on it now and say it was all worth it.
 

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We've had new members ask if there is a private club, secret handshake, or password to getting their first vizsla. It can feel like you can't be trusted with the breed, unless you've already proved yourself worthy, by owning one.
While your looking for your pup/rescue contact your local vizsla club. When they have a trial, show, or even a training day, go out and meet some of the dogs, and owners.
I've seen what appears to be some really nice vizslas in foster homes. They have one drawback that makes them harder to place. They need to be in a 1 dog home, and most of us already have a V or 2.
 

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Yes. And I've rejected at least hundreds - probably thousands. Really only a couple that wanted no docking, no vaccinations, holistic only rearing, etc, etc.. I have never regretted either being rejected or rejecting in the end. At the time rejection stings, no doubt. But it is far better that the breeder did so and the sting is short than place a dog and put everyone's life in turmoil because of a bad placement to save a persons feelings. It's a big picture thing.

If the breeder felt it wasn't right - good for them. It isn't personal although it feels like it. They're using their best judgement for their pups. Nothing more, nothing less. What you don't see is that often for one litter of 8 pups that breeder has gone through not dozens but a hundred or more e-mails and phone calls on that one litter. Everyone wants to come see the pups and Mom, and if we let everyone interested show up at the door it would be chaos.

Hang in there. It's worth it!

Best,
Ken

Forgot to add - as far as an undocked tail question goes - How would I know which pup to leave undocked at two days old? 100% of the time I've gotten that question, it was a animal rights leaning person who has the uninformed illusion that docking was somehow inhumane, yet when we actually have a conversation about it instead of a soundbite they heard, it came to light they really had absolutely no concept of what was involved, how or when it was performed or that there was a valid reason for dews and docks in a working Vizsla.
 

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Years ago I had a breeder tell me " People don't get to pick my pups. I pick who gets my pups."
While it may sound blunt, you want a breeder that chooses carefully who they entrust with their pups. Both you, and the breeder need to speak freely, how else would either know if its a good fit. I want to be open and honest with them, and expect the same from them. If I caught one holding something back, I would walk away, and expect they would do the same. We do a lot of research on breeders before making contact. If we are new to the breed, they only have the questionnaire and phone conversations to make their decision.

Its a good idea to ask your local vizsla club, and rescue about any breeder you might be interested in. If they have been breeding vizslas for years, these people should have first hand knowledge of their dogs.
 
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