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So we have a 9 month old Vizsla named Parker and an 8 week old Vizsla named Bailey. Parker tends to not listen and steals food or random papers off the table or socks or wet towls. When we go to grab what he has away from him he growls at us and shows his teeth. We've tried to be mean, we've tried to be nice, nothing works. We don't want to just let him go bc that means he wins and it'll only get worse. There has been a few close calls to of him trying to bite us once we try to grab his muzzle. He actually bit my bfs hand tonight (my bf and I live w/ eachother so he is not a stranger) when he tried to get a sock out of his mouth. What do you suggest us to do?? He cannot keep being like this or someone will get hurt eventually. I was bite by a Jack Russel Terrier when I was 13 in the mouth, stiches and all and I am afraid when Parker gets something bc I can't do anything about it. Thats not making me the boss if he gets away with it. What do you guys suggest?
 

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I think from the sounds of the post that you might be a little in over your head. Thats just my assumption however...you should consider a trainer. At 9mo your window is closing to nip this stuff and I'm sure there are several factors not listed in the post that are contributing to the behavior. As RBD mentioned, excersise and training is one facet of the household dynamic, but my guess is that there are a host of other little signs you're not picking up that eventually bring Parker to his end.

back to square one for parker on obedience, training, boundries, limitations - whatever you want to call it.

How is the pup in all this?
 

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All the advice I've read from professionals is not to have a struggle with a dog who guards--I know it seems counterintuitive from the standpoint of dominance theory, but having a showdown actually strengthens the object guarding rather than weakening it. The dog learns, "I thought I was just being paranoid, but turns out, these humans really ARE going to try to take stuff from me, and I'd better hang onto the stuff I want at all costs." Instead (and I know some will disagree) use a treat for a trade at first. Every time your dog releases the object in exchange for a treat, say the words "drop it" or "give" right as the dog is releasing the object. Ideally, you should practice this many times with dog toys or other objects you don't need back, so that after the dog releases the object to you, you can actually hand it right back to the dog. The dog gets a treat AND gets the object back. Over time, the dog learns that good things happen when he gives you what you want, and eventually, you will be able to use the cue "drop it" or "give" to simply ask for what you want from the dog. Gradually, you will phase out the treats and ultimately, have a struggle-free way to get back your items. Here is a link: http://www.mspca.org/programs/pet-owner-resources/dog-care/dog-behavior-tips/leave-itdrop-it.html
 

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I agree with everything above. We also have a possessive vizsla, but he started to show possessiveness at a much younger age. We tried everything as well- being nice, being mean, etc. I hate the idea of trading the item for a treat, but I started out this way. Once he knew my approach towards him meant good things, I started asking him to drop it without a treat, picked up the item, THEN gave him the treat. We have a special stash of high value treats we ONLY use for drop it, so he continues to want to drop whatever he has because he knows he will get something extra tasty.
 

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We to have an extremely aggressive Vizsla. Our son got him at 7 weeks. Our son had to move temp to another state. So mom and dad is taking of Orion. He is very talkative whines, barks to get his way. He wants to be petted only on his terms and when tired of being petted he will go into a red zone attack. He has bitten my son (his owner). Our son was on couch Orion got on couch our son touched Orion. Orion went into a complete red zone attack. Not a BITE. A full on ATTACK. He bit my husband. Husband touched him when getting out of bed. Orion sat next to me I was petting him suddenly he turned his head eyes dialated and went into a full attack mode.
Orion just turned 3 he is an intact male. He WILL be neutered this friday.
Don't know what else to do. We have had other issues. EXTREMELY FOOD AGGRESSIVE.
Will put down if this does not work.
If anyone has any ideas PLEASE HELP
 

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Will put down if this does not work.
If anyone has any ideas PLEASE HELP
Do not do this please.


If you can not find a way through this then the Vizsla community will help. There are many ways to deal with this behavior. Your situation is hard because you did not "want the dog" but being the good parent were there to help your son.

There are hundreds of posts here on the forum about these behaviors, dozens of books, thousands of dog trainers that can all help. Putting a good Vizsla down is the very last resort.

Vizslas are high-energy hunting dogs that need a special knowledge base.

You can send a PM and I'd be willing to give you some suggestions off-line.

Rod
 

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jlradolec please listen to redbirddog and others on this site. There is more to these dogs.

Julius.
 

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I am here because I want to save Orion. When son purchased and took to vet. The vet said Orion was probably one of the most Alpha dogs he had ever seen at his practice. Lawarenceville Ga. He told my son how to deal and to get a handle on him. Orion was prob 8 weeks. My son never followed thru. He doesn"t take well to a stern tone. He has never been beat or abused. You can see his mood change.
Other night he was in bed my husband touched him with his foot. Within a second dog had a foot on my husbands chest and was approx. 4 inches away from my husbands face in the red zone growling. He growled for about a minute or more. Neither of us moved. finally he got off bed was all stiff hair all up he is not allowed in any bedroom
 

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Orion is a very beautiful and very smart dog. He has been given no formal obedience training nor has he been trained to hunt. I feel he gets alot of exercise. I actually run him with my car a couple times a day approx. 3 miles. We have a Ga. pwr rite of way that I take him to he swims. We take him to a seldom used 9 hole golf course and let him run.
The real prob is he is a hunting dog that should be hunted 2 or 3 times a week not a house dog first.
son got him cause he was pretty not for practical purposes.
 

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http://www.atlantavizsla.org/

Can you contact this club in Atlanta? If you could contact them and maybe meet with some of them.

Orion can be evaluated by Vizsla people and give you some one on one advice. Bailey, my intact male, is quite a handful.

You are exercising Orion's body but he needs his mind exercised. I really applaud you reaching out to try to save Orion. It is not too late but you are running out of time. He has just reached adulthood. There is a home for Orion if not yours.

The situations you have outlined would make me take immediate action! You need help from more knowledgeable people. Not a knock on you and your spouse but unless you know how to deal with a Vizsla that has no "bounds", you will make more mistakes.

Orion wants to be a part of your pack but doesn't know how. He doesn't know where he fits. I bet he feels he has to be the alpha of the pack because no one else is taking that role. Every pack needs a leader.

Orion's mind can be exercised by many ways other than hunting. Use your local Vizsla club. THEY WILL HELP YOU.

Hope this helps.

Hundreds of posts on my blog about raising these dogs. I had never owned a Vizsla until 4 years ago. The learning curve was very steep. Spend an evening starting at the beginning and come forward. My intention of redbirddog was to help folks like you to understand how to live happily with these wonderful dogs.

Rod
http://redbirddog.blogspot.com
 

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I have contacted the atl vizsla club . They can't take because he has bitten. I was given the name of someone else. She also can not take. Like I said he came to us with these problems. My son is very laid back. everything Orion did was cute and good boy. In the beginning my son did not have the room for such a high energy dog. Orion destroyed his couch. Orion started eating the drywall in his house. Orion gets alot of exercise. but he needs new scents. Orion needs to be hunting. Orion chases butterflys, lizards, birds, squirrels, foxes. He goes in the woods. Orion will climb on a fallen tree with nothing but agility. I believe had Orion been trained to hunt he would have championship by his name.
I am defenitely praying that neutering helps. This Friday
 

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I believe had Orion been trained to hunt he would have championship by his name.
http://www.vccne.net/files/Articles/goodwkids.pdf

The field trial dogs are hard driven and Orion could have been. Field trial training isn't so much about hunting but about directing the DRIVE that nature gave Orion. Hunting is a team sport and the dog learns that he can not get the bird without the hunter and loves being part of the team. Field trials build on nature and the dog learns the hunter is the key to success.

The Vizsla club may not take Orion but sure could help you in finding resources to assist you.

The neutring can help but isn't the silver bullet. Leadership is.


Good luck.

Rod
 

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I am by no means as experienced an owner as some others on this site but wanted to suggest a few things we do with my 6 1/2 month pup Mac. He is also very driven by his nose and needs his mind worked constantly. He gets lots of exercise but as mentioned in other posts we realised early on that if we didn't work his mind we would be in trouble.

To help his drive there are a few things we do. We have several toys that slowly release his food. This makes him have to work for his meals. We feed him only half or sometimes even only a third of his meal in his bowl and the rest in toys that he has to work on. Also with him out of the room I hide small piles of his food around the kitchen. Then open the door and say "Find it!!!" and he loves this. It is indoor hunting! Also some of his meal is given to him by doing training so, sit, stay, lay down etc.

I know you stated that he is food aggressive so the training might be difficult if you are giving him food from your hand but the "find it" game and dispensing toys would be a good start. If you make him work for food this should make him realise that food is something that you control. Your aim should be to get where you can put his bowl on the ground and he won't touch it unless you give him a command. This will take time and from a dog that I had in the past you will have some progress and then might go back a bit but after awhile it will work. If you are looking to rehome him start with some of these suggestions as whoever takes him on will need the process to start now. Best of luck. I hope you find a solution.
 

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I actually run him with my car a couple times a day approx. 3 miles. We have a Ga. pwr rite of way that I take him to he swims. We take him to a seldom used 9 hole golf course and let him run.
"The single most powerful tool we have for bonding with our dogs is the walk. Walking is a primal exercise that awakens all of her pack instincts. No amount of toys or treats will make her happier than a brisk, hourly walk by your side. Yet the walk is one area where dog owners seem to have the most problems. Most people have the dog out in front, pulling them forward. I’ve asked the reason for this and I usually get, “She loves her freedom.” Freedom?

A dog is a pack animal and what she really wants from the walk is leadership and structure. To me, the best role models for great dog walking technique are the homeless and the service dog-using handicapped! Why? They seem to better understand the concept of canine pack leadership. The leader is always in front during the walk. And for many homeless, their dogs often aren’t even on a leash – they choose to stay behind or beside their owners.

Of course a dog wants to sniff the ground and pee on a tree during the walk, but it is important that we as pack leaders understand that we should be making the “when and where” decisions for them. Following our rules gives the dog confidence because she’s working for every privilege she gets." - Cesar Millan

http://redbirddog.blogspot.com/2009/06/importance-of-mastering-art-of-walk.html
 

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jradolec,

You can contact the following professionals for an evaluation and/or a referral to someone closer. This one is in Athens, but again, might know who is closer and can work with you on the aggression:

Sharon Crowell-Davis
Department of Anatomy and Radiology
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602-7382
office tel: 706.542.0269
[email protected]
http://www.vet.uga.edu/var/services/behavior.php
I provide legal consultations
I accept media inquiries

The following person has a Ph.D. in animal behavior (is a certified applied animal behaviorist--kind of like a psychologist but for dogs) and works with aggression--looks to be in the Georgia area based on area code, but I'm not sure where.
http://www.animalharmony.com/index.html

The following professional is in Macon--again, not very close, but might know of someone closer to you (EDIT--actually, he may be in Atlanta, email him to check location):

John C. Wright, Ph.D., CAAB
(certification expires: 12/31/12)
Professor of Psychology
Mercer University
1400 Coleman Avenue
Macon, GA 31207
Tel - 478-301-2973
Atlanta Tel: 404-524-5500
Fax - 478-301-2956
E-mail - [email protected]
Website - www.mercer.edu/psychology/Faculty_Staff/Wright_JC/Wright_JC.htm
 

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Hi all,

Just took Orion to vet and had neutered.
Had an incident in vets office. Had been walking Orion on leash at our house with me making Orion sit stay come and not pull. All was going fine. When we went to vet office for neutering new scents. Well Orion starts really pulling refused to listen. I had his leash on in form of a choke. It became a fight between Orion wanting to go smell other dogs or me not allowing. When Orion realized he could not get his way he threw a tantrum. Orion almost got choked out. Finally Orion quit fighting and just laid down. Office help came out but Orion and I were in the middle of a red zone struggle.
Had a serious talk with vet. Vet said I had done the right thing. Vet said neutering will help some. But that Orion is in need of serious help or euthanasia. The vet also said he is against euthanasia if all other avenues have failed.
Our vet is going to call someone and give our number to for some serious intervention.
Our vet said this is a case of serious DOMINANT AGGRESSION.
I will keep you guys updated Please pray and cross your fingers for Orion.
Thanks to all who have pm me for advice.
 

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Our vet said this is a case of serious DOMINANT AGGRESSION.
Think of Orion as that star high school football player.

The star football player will not listen or respect the meek person but will respect the calm assertive and tough drill Sargent.

The trainer you find needs to work with you and Orion.

The Dominant Aggression may be hereditary and the breeder should be contacted to let them know what is happening.

The forum needs to hear from you on how this goes. Orion may not be able to be saved, and that would be a shame. If that is what eventually happens after you have tried all other avenues, then use what you have learned to help others on the forum understand what you have gone through.

Correcting problems early by finding the reasons and never "hoping" the dog will grow out of it might be a lesson to be learned.

Good luck and I will pray for Orion.

RBD
 

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Thanks RBD,

Our vet has 2 ladies in mind I think one is just mainly obedience. The other one actually works with the police dept to help train and condition police dogs. After discussing with vet we both think that would be the better way.

Vet also said there is a window of development for learning when the puppy is still a pup. If not given the proper obedience and discipline this is the result of an ALPHA DOG. Although the vet did not think hopeless. Vet said alot of work ahead with no guarantees.

Vet said all avenues need to be pursued before euthenasia.

We are starting the long road. Hopefully with Orions intelligence we will get there quickly.

I will keep you updated on Orions progress.
 

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I like your vet jlradolec. Go with the lady who works with police dogs - you will not regret it. Your V will not hunt and it's too late for hunting. Obedience, drive and focus training will make you an amazing dog.
But as far as hoping that neutering would solve aggression... it may be a little late for that. Generally police GSDs are neutered at 2 years for a reason. They need to be fully grown and strong and aggressive looking. But those dogs are trained by qualified professionals (I respect all those working in the field training those dogs).
Neutering at 6 months makes a difference as far as aggression is concerned.
 
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