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Seen some great vizzie pics and action shots on here lately (in the xmas comp section), and am jealous of the great pictures people are getting on their vizslas. I just have a basic camera and want to invest in a good one for action shots. Can anyone recommend any??
 

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I haven't posted any pics for the competition but I use a Kodak Z981 with a 26X Optical Zoom (equivalent to 672mm lens) and 14 megapixels. I only paid $250 for it and I saw it recently for $199 somewhere. Mine replaced a Nikon with 5 megapixels and 8X Optical Zoom that I paid over $800 for and I think this one takes better pictures. Maybe not the best on the market but a very good value for the money.
 

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I recently researched digital cameras and found one I want. But because I don't own it, of course I won't swear it's the best. It's also a canon, the powershot SD4000 IS. Not cheap, though (I guess everything's relative, cheap compared to 1200, it's about 300), and probably more than I need. I'm thinking anything will be a giant step up from the cell phone cameras I've been using for years.
 

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BamBam

It's not so much the camera, as the lens.
Good actions shots have two obstacles to overcome. Distance, and light. The farther away the shot is, the lens needs to gather more light ( Aperature Setting, or F-stop). Also to capture the activity the lens needs to be very fast ( Shutter speed).
A fast lens, with a low F-Stop is $$$.
Just about any name brand digital SLR body is more than capable, but it's the lens that makes the camera. Stick with Canon, or Nikon for the widest amount of lens, cross and backwards compatability. They also have the largest third party lens offerings. The other name brands are every bit as capable, but every third party lens maker has a full range of lenses for Canon and Nikon.
A digital body with an approximate 50-200mm zoom, 80-200mm is more common, will probably be more than enough. I have a Nikon D90 with the stock 18-105mm and it's not enough. I'm looking at an 80-200mm zoom but they start at about $600.00 just for lens and go up to about $4k depending on how low an fStop can be achieved at full zoom.
You also want a camera with a "continuous, or burst" mode.

As I stated, I have the Nikon D90. I like it a lot, but the menu structure is complicated and not intuitive.
 

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Okay, believe it or not I took photography in high school. But I'm pretty out of it. I haven't owned a camera other than a cell phone camera in decades. So...what does SLR stand for? I have the idea that these models give you lots of manual control you wouldn't have with a more compact camera. What else do they offer (e.g., in terms of action shots) that gives them an advantage over a compact point and shoot camera?
 

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sarahaf said:
Okay, believe it or not I took photography in high school. But I'm pretty out of it. I haven't owned a camera other than a cell phone camera in decades. So...what does SLR stand for? I have the idea that these models give you lots of manual control you wouldn't have with a more compact camera. What else do they offer (e.g., in terms of action shots) that gives them an advantage over a compact point and shoot camera?

SLR, Single Lens Reflex, means that you are" looking through the lens" when you look into the eyepiece.

The primary advantage of the full bodied SLR, versus a compact point and shoot, is that it does everything a compact point and shoot does, but better. And then much more depending on how much you're willing to spend.
The compression algorithms, lens quality, sensor chips, and firmware in the full sized SLR's far exceed what you would expect to find in a compact. Which is reflective of the price.
Where most compacts use optical zoom to a point, and then switch to digital zoom. The full bodies use optical zoom. Digital zoom is once again an algorithm the camera performs to fill in the holes. It sees the picture at one focal length,and fills in what the picture should look like at a further focal length. Optical zoom is just the lens. What the lens sees, at a given focal length, is the image the sensor receives. Some full bodied SLR cameras are a hybrid of both. Optical and digital zoom.
Almost all of the full bodied SLR's have many "modes", one usually being a "sports mode" of some type. The modes have automatic presets for that type of photography, but they can also be manually controlled inside of the mode. Frames Per Second, FPS, is a big part of stop action photography. In the sport modes the FPS can be higher than in Manual, or Automatic. Along with the continuous, or burst mode, and the ability of the storage media to store the images this is what allows you to capture that image and freeze it.
 

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Hi, I also have a Canon 450D SLR, I think that's the UK name for the Rebel. Excedllent, I can't recommend it enough!
 

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Gunnr,

What do you think of this one? http://www.crutchfield.com/p_280SD4KS/Canon-PowerShot-SD4000-IS-Silver.html?tp=262&tab=detailed_info
I do want something more compact and less expensive than an SLR.
As I understand it, the optical zoom is its primary weakness relative to some other compact models (remember, though, this is "my first camera," at least in decades). But it does have HD movie recording, a continuous shooting mode and high speed burst mode. People seem to think the fact it is "only" 10 megapixels is actually a good thing for image quality. Here is what CNET had to say: http://reviews.cnet.com/digital-cameras/canon-powershot-sd4000-is/4505-6501_7-34099352.html?tag=mncol;lst#reviewPage1
 

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have to agree with Bambam some of the action shots are fab, I've gots of pics of snow and sky from were scooby WAS, i will have to look into buy a new one!
 

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Sarahaf

It looks like a nice camera to me.
We use the Canon point and shoots at work, in radiologically contaminated areas, to photograph work locations and they work very well. These are some very difficult areas for photography. Poor lighting, and when there is lighting its a mixture of halogen, incandescent, flourescent, high temperature pipes and surfaces and all types of ESM interference and blockage that would have an effect on IR focus.
 

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I personally think that Canon makes some of the best P&S type cameras... although it seems most of you have a larger camera budget than I do ;D Their higher-end stuff is also great from what I have seen.
 

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I have owned 2 Canon rebels and they are great cameras! I am on my second because I wanted to upgrade. The lens is very important so make sure you get a nice lens with whatever camera you buy. Its worth the investment because you will have this camera for a long time and the pictures you will have taken will be fantastic!
 

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Thanks Gunnr and everyone for the endorsement of canon products (which is what I'm leaning toward getting). Gunnr, the only other point and shoot model I might consider from Canon would be the powershot S95. http://www.crutchfield.com/p_280S95/Canon-PowerShot-S95.html?search=Canon+VENDORID280&searchdisplay=Canon&tp=262&tab=detailed_info It's very similar to the SD4000 IS but the S95 has a lot more manual controls (which I might not use), is more expensive, and it may have a better sensor (?). I actually could see a difference in the sharpness and detail in the sample photos on imaging-resource.com http://www.imaging-resource.com/IMCOMP/COMPS01.HTM favoring the S95, but I'm not sure I'd really see that with everyday use and I wonder if the SD4000 IS would be easier for an amateur to use. Maybe I'm just trying to justify not spending the extra money...
 

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Sarahaf

I don't think one would be "harder", or "easier" to use. The menu items and structure are going to be similar, which determines the ease of use. The rest is just a "camera".
I don't think you would go wrong with either.
 

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Gunnr,

I see what you mean now about what a dSLR does. I can see the sharpness and detail in your pics and some of the others in the competition. For now, since I have a feeling I'd never lug one of those around (and I'm a beginner), I'll have to be content with a quality point and shoot. I am playing around with the Canon SD4000 which I got. Since I'm a little obsessive, I think I want to try out the more advanced S95 before deciding which one to keep (if I can get my hands on one--it's on backorder now). I'm starting to get seduced by the idea of its full manual options, just in case I want to advance my skills later. The SD4000 does deliver on its promise of good low light shots with no flash, though (took some of Rosie last night with just a couple of lightbulbs on in a dark room).

Sarah
 

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Have you checked Amazon to buy it from? There are some sellers who have it available. Not sure if you are in the US or not though, or if those companies will ship outside of the US.
 
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