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So my long-term boyfriend and I are moving in together this summer after I finish up the school year here (a town 2 hours away from my hometown, and where he lives). I'll be moving back once school finishes in May, and we'll be getting an apartment together. Since we're both avid animal people, we want to get a furry companion. We've thought about cats (don't get me wrong, I love them dearly), but we're looking into the dog area. We've already decided which breed to get, a Vizsla.

I am pretty familiar with this breed and he has had plenty of contact with them in the past. We've done the research, and know that they're an extremely active breed and need lots of attention, and are very much "velcro" dogs. We love all of those aspects, and intend to give it plenty of exercise, love, and attention. We're both very active people and the thought of going on daily runs, hikes, trips to the park, etc, don't frighten us off. We look at it as a bonding experience that benefits everyone.

It'll get the proper training it needs, as we'll take it to training classes and since we've both had numerous dogs in our lives, we know about raising dogs. Money won't be the issue since both of us are financially stable, so vet bills and care costs will be taken care of.

I'm just afraid that because of our age (I'm 19, he's 20) and our situation (he works, I work and am in school), a breeder will cross us off. We're fully capable of giving everything the dog needs, and more, but I'm afraid that since we're so young that a breeder will see us as irresponsible or a risk that they don't want to put their puppy in. There's no reason for them to be wary, one of us will always be home, and if not, my family lives close by on 5-acre land, so the dog will always have someone to take care of it.

We got in contact with an excellent breeder and have decided to meet with her. We're both very excited, and a bit nervous, since it's our first time encountering a breeder. Anything we should watch out for, anything in particular? I've already asked her all the necessary questions - how are the puppies socialized, where are they kept, what will they be fed, are they vaccinated and dewormed, are the parents certified, how often do you breed, etc, etc. Is there any other questions I should ask her when I visit? Any advice on how to not be nervous with the first meeting? Thanks!
 

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Be sure you meet the sire and dam. Temperament is passed to offspring.

If I was a breeder I would be asking you "How long have you and your boyfriend been together? Not the we see each other on weekends, but lived together. The day in day out dealing with problems that arise is different than just going out and having fun. If you spilt up can you still take care of the dog?

My daughter owns a vizsla that lives with me. She will be 20 this month, goes to college and works part time.She comes by the house and takes Lucy for a outing about once a week. It will probaly be another year or two before she will be taking Lucy with her. I wouldn't care if Lucy always lived with us. My point is what is your back up plan for this pup?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
We've been together for almost a year, and I can assure you that we plan on being together for quite some time. But in the event that something does happen, I would be the one taking the pup. If, for some reason, we split up and moved out, I would move back in with my parents who have a large house and guest house on a 5 acre property. Also, the university I will be attending is in the same town as the town my parents and I live in, so there's no travelling or commute involved. I also plan to be a part time student, while working a few days a week part time as well. I have a sister that is close to my age that agrees to watch/help out with the pup if needs be.
 

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There are two types of reputable breeders - those are concerned mainly with the well-being of puppies they breed and place, and those who are trying to create a more perfect and healthier Vizsla.

Breeders from either camp will be weary of you (as you rightly noted) because you don't have any kind of record to prove you won't get bored with the dog in 1, 3 or 10 years. They will wonder if you will treat the dog well, take good care of it and give it a good and happy life. They know that every potential puppy owner comes in and promises the world, but the younger they are the more likelihood that things will change or happen and the dog will be neglected. There are multiple cases of very solid dog-loving families forced to give up their dogs because someone loses their job or they get divorced, etc.

Breeders from the second camp take it to a whole other level. They are looking for puppy owners who want to get involved in dog related activities (conformation, hunting tests or hunting, field trials, agility, rally, etc) - a deeper level of interaction with the dog world than people who just want a "pet". These breeders care less about age or experience than about your interest and motivation, because this depth of involvement is really a life-long passion and commitment. The best puppies (appearance, temperament) always go to these families and these breeders almost always produce better dogs.

I don't know how involved you plan to be (and I hope you're keeping an open mind), but regardless of which category your breeder falls into, the best thing you can do is be yourself.

Don't think of it as an exam to pass (or cheat, in absence of other options) but as a chance to meet with an interesting new person from a really different world. Your character, honesty and enthusiasm will be the only thing both of you will have to rely on.

What I'm saying is the chemistry and level of mutual trust you develop with the breeder is the best indication of a happy outcome. Breeders usually go through so many puppy buyers, they have a pretty good sense of who is for real and who isn't. The same applies to you - if you don't think you're developing a rapport with her and if you don't like what you see - walk away. She's not the only vizsla breeder in the world.
 

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Get married first. That will test your commitment for 15+ years.

Most marriages don't out-last one dog's life time. :'(

My bride and I got married 38 years ago. I was 20 and she was 19. Most people would have bet against us in the "early years." The odds were against us and it was tough.

Should you get a Vizsla now? No. But I'm just using "the odds" factor of success. See how marriage is before you bring "a child" that needs a lot more than a cat.

Not what you wanted to hear, and please ignore this as just one man's opinion.

You are now an adult and can make those choices. I just never have been of the thought process that allows for the parents of an adult to be "the fall back plan".

Once an adult; always an adult.

RBD
 

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I am 23 years old. I have been with my boyfriend for 10 years. We do not live together. When I got my V a few months ago, I got him for ME. I wanted him and knew I had what it took. You seem yo be very mature and have thought this out in every scenario! That to me, shows how serious you are. I did not get my dog from a breeder. A family friend gave him to me. But, I did worry about the same things before I got Cole and was looking for a breeder.

" They might think I am too young"

"Maybe I am not experienced enough with Vizslas"

Valid arguments, but like someone else said you should just be yourself. You seem to have it together and I really think a Vizsla could be a great thing for you and may even make your relationship with your boyfriend stronger. If not, its great that you know who would be taking the dog in the worst case scenario! Again...just ask all about the parents, the temperaments, the training they recommend, etc.

These dogs CAN be difficult, but if you are up for the challenge, it's going to be one of the best things you do in life! How exciting this is for you! Let us know how it goes! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The breeder we're meeting with currently is sort of a mix of the two. She competes with her dogs and searches for competitive home but also tries to place her pups in the best home she can. I just hope that my boyfriend and I, by being ourselves, will lead to a happy outcome.

We're waiting to get married, and I don't necessarily think that getting married will show how committed we are to owning the dog, seeing as we're very committed to each other already. I know married couples who are less committed than we are :p
But as for mentioning my parents in my "fall back plan", it's not that I would rely on them to take care of the dog. I just meant that I would move back into their guest house while I search for a place of my own. People of all ages do that all the time.

My boyfriend and I (especially me) are certainly up for the challenge that this dog will bring! We're both looking for a dog that will test us and keep us on our feet, not just any ol' lap dog. I definitely think this will bring us stronger as a couple. And I will definitely post updates on how it goes! :D

Thanks for everyone's comments. Much appreciated!
 

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First off, you will need to take everyone's opinions with a grain of salt. You are very wise to ask the very question on a forum as many people would just go and get the dog. This does show you are committed to making the right decision

With that being said, we are all Vizsla owners and been through the good and the bad as these dogs can be challenging at times. We are very protective of the breed and want to always make sure everyone understands what they are getting into.

Our story of getting our Vizsla Ruby came into play because we tried for many years of having children and could not. We felt that getting a V would be the best option for us because of lifestyle and my husband had one growing up. After being settled in a home, married for a few years, yearning and preparing for children, I cannot tell you still how stressful it was having Ruby. She has changed our life forever. We can no longer go anywhere without figuring out what we will be doing with Ruby first. She is our priority everyday. I work from home and we still need to get Ruby to doggie daycare a few days a week so I know she will be happy (and worn out).

I don't mean to tell you this to scare you away but you will be having a lot of changes at once. Moving in together, school, jobs, etc. That is a lot to take on and getting a very demanding dog might make sense to do at a later date.

Good luck with what ever decision you make.
 

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Good things to think about from RubyRoo.

Also, you asked how not to be nervous on your first meeting.

Think of the meeting, not as an interview for you, but as a MEETING. You both have the responsibility to evaluate if a puppy from this breeder will fit into your home. The breeder should have a checklist for potential homes – you should have a checklist, too!

Be ready to walk away if this breeder cannot or does not meet your requirements. An ‘excellent’ breeder (or their puppies) may still not be a good fit for you.

Good luck!
 

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I too commend you for asking the question. It does show that you want to make the right decision and make sure you're prepared.

I was sort of in a similar situation when it came to getting our pup. My boyfriend and I are only a few years older than you (I'm 25, he's a bit older; I'm also working and finishing grad school) and we really wanted to make sure we could do everything possible for the dog before we got him. We've been together for 3+ years and fully intend on getting married in the near future, but we had a few "uncomfortable" conversations to talk about what we would do with the dog should we break up or should something happen to one of us. We also made sure that we would be willing to do anything and everything for him no matter the time or money necessary and that we were ready to make all sacrifices for the pup from moving our work schedules around to not doing so many social events. Basically, we approached it like this was a child. We had all of these conversations prior to talking to a breeder because I fully expected a breeder to ask since we're young and it's an nontraditional living arrangement. Our breeder and I did have multiple VERY lengthy conversations about the breed, how he raised his dogs, how we planned on raising ours, etc where we built trust between us because the trust does need to be mutual. Then we went from there.

I would suggest you be yourself when you talk to the breeder because you will begin to doubt yourself and the situation if you aren't honest. Plus, to build trust you need to be yourself and so does the breeder. If the breeder tells you that they don't feel you're a fit for one of their pups right now then they're being honest with you and you can't ask much more than that from a breeder.

Living together takes time to adjust to and it brings its own stresses especially so early in a relationship. Adding a puppy into the mix, a VERY high energy one at that, will definitely add stress to the mix, coupled with school and work. I would just make sure that you have all of your t's crossed and your i's dotted before you do get a pup because it can get overwhelming and I'll be the first to admit it. I wish you the best as you make your decision!
 

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I also want to add that when you meet with the breeder to have expectations you want your breeder to meet. It's easy to get caught up in getting a new, shiny puppy and want to take the first one available but you should be confident in walking away should you feel like something isn't right. I also wouldn't hesitate to talk to other breeders to compare notes, even if this is the breeder you choose to go with. Before and after I had put a deposit down with our breeder I made calls to a few others to compare and make sure I had made the best decision for us.
 

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I know you will do what you want in the end, but here's my advice (take it or leave it):

Give yourself a good 6 months to get settled into your new home, job, school, lifestyle, etc. before you add a puppy to the mix.

I worked and went to school while my hubby worked for the first 4 months of our marriage and it was extremely difficult. I can't imagine adding a Vizsla puppy to the mix. The first couple months of a puppy's life are the most crucial in terms of development/socialization. You want what's best for you and the pup, so do yourselves both a favor and take things slowly.

Plus, you want to get at least a few movie/dinner dates in before the puppy takes up all your free time! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
We're definitely going to give us some time after we move in before getting the dog! It'll be around 6 months to a year after we move in that we'll actually get one. We just want to make sure early on that we know what we're getting ourselves into and to meet with our desired breeder to develop a relationship before we take the plunge.

Again, thanks everyone for the comments! They've been so helpful :)
 

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Hi There,

I just have a quick .02. Hubby and I live in an apartment, are first time vizsla owners and didn't plan to compete with our little guy. We were immediately rejected by some of the breeders in the area.

We also rejected breeders because they did not live up to our standards - many, actually. As others have mentioned, you're looking for the right fit. Just as much as they are interviewing you, you are interviewing them. It sounds like you know the right questions.

Look through "Before You Get Your Puppy" by Ian Dunbar (free pdf available online, just google). There were some good questions in there to ask pre-puppy. By the time I found the book, I had already confirmed with the breeder, but remember thinking I wish I read the book first.

Best of luck!! You'll have to let us know how it goes.
 

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Hi!
My husband (then boyfriend) moved in together when we were 21 and I highly recommend getting used to living together, schedules, etc before taking on such a giant responsibility. Even though we are 27 now and have lived together for 6 years, getting a pup challenged our communication and priorities so recommend having a year or 2 together before pup. You can still plan and learn about the breed before hand and it will be exciting anticipating the pup!
 

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This may get me fired :eek:

Age 19 I would spank you some and then the guppie would face me ;)

I did this to my Daughter and lost her she is almost know 21

not a spanking but I caned him some fun omg" ;)

None loved my daughter other then God like me or gave my all earning the word Father and Daddy

She was not ready and this is not a judge or jury at either of you

Men are goofs until about age 30

I was until age almost 40 mayor player my bad and I changed

these ages are kids like changing socks and no hate Apt's your ages

Uno migo No Mas

No disrespect please hear me

You give the milk Free they take your souls

and yes I am old as dirt but I had 5 or more going these ages

Boys don't have full work benches a few men do

Make him earn you over times spent

If I am fired it was to save some hurts

over the years many of these hurts called me Big Pappa or Dad

God bless you God grace you and again

no hate and like most these are just words but from hurts I helped some and tried to save all colors

Ps= I love and miss YOU MY DAUGHTER until my last breath
You were my best"
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the book suggestion, I'll definitely have to check it out!

And we're definitely waiting awhile before we get the pup. Right now we're just deciding which breed to seriously consider and looking at breeders to decide which one we want to work with. We definitely want to get used to our routines before bringing in a puppy, which we already acknowledge is a huge responsibility. :)
 

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My fiancé and I moved in together at 23 and 24 and had already been together 3 years at the time. And we're not engaged until two months ago, which was after 8 years together. After three years together, moving in together, out if state was amazing. We had another honeymoon period and looking back I'm so glad we were not allowed a pup in the apartment bec I think we would have missed out on a lot of the fun that we had. We got Dozer a few weeks after buying a house. Then got Penny a year and a half later, then got engaged. A little backwards but it works for us. But having these two is so much like what I think kids will be. Extremely consuming of all resources, especially time and money. And money and time and time and money. Sinking in? Speaking from personal experience PLEASE wait at least a year. You're so young and I want you to enjoy it. My only REAL concern is money. I know you said you are financially stable but a dog is a gamble. And our first cost us thousands of dollars in the first year and even thousands in one day. Most of this unexpected obviously. The biggest thing we learned is these dogs are not cheap if you're going to treat them like family when they have issues. Best of luck to you!
 

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My boyfriend and I have been together for 3 years and lived together for 2 years. We got Olive in September and its been like having a baby.

Im sure you will be fine but it has been tough making time for us and the change from just being us to now being 3.

I would live together for a bit first before you have a dog. We never argue but the first 6 months of living together is hard enough without a ginger beast biting you and sobbing in the night ;D
 
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