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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I joke but somewhat seriously, the process of weeding through reputable breeders, trying to find one that will respond do you AND finding one that will put you on a waitlist seems nearly impossible. Especially since I've seen a few who have had litters without any announcements. Is it like being initiated into a secret club? ;) I'm also not just sending in a "Do you have a puppy?" type email, it's at least a 3 paragraph biography although I'm pretty sure my story is the same as the next "active PNW family."

I think I have a shot for a puppy that will be ready in 4 months or by summer 2022.

I also want to ask, has anyone here owned a GSP? I'm also considering a GSP and am weighing whether to go that route (if timing with a great breeder works out) or vizsla with less than great timing. In terms of lifestyle, we are a typical running, biking, hiking family. Not hunters but the dog will be exercised and my 11yo is keen to get into 4H, obedience, agility, etc. However, I worry about the separation anxiety vizslas are prone to. My husband and I work fulltime, dog would be alone 8-3, I would hire someone to come in the middle of the day (more when the pup is a puppy). GSP's seem more resilient. Pros/cons?
 

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Your dog, once a year old will have no issue with being home alone from 8-3 with no breaks.

I know V’s with anxiety and many without. Same with gsp’s. Nature and nurture both play a role in this, so I think your training, some good genetics and a good start in life go a long way here; I’d prioritize that over breed.

The breeds are different. Vizslas are softer (sensitive) dogs and smaller. Resilience is dog specific I think rather than breed... my male vizsla is the most resilient dog I’ve met but my brothers vizsla gal is delicate.

I relate to vizsla’s more than gsp’s but I do appreciate the breed
 
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I agree with @organicthoughts.
Vizslas are really dog specific. I’ve owned seven of them, and fostered three others. Each had their own personalities. Some are very soft, some middle of the road, and others take things in stride.

I’ve owned a GSP, but that was 30 some odd years ago. The breed over all should be a little more independent, than the vizsla breed.
But that is not always the case., it still comes down to the dog.
Any breed can suffer from separation anxiety, including GSPs.
 
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Finding a puppy at this time of the year, at least in North America, has you "in between cycles". By that I mean that breeders like to have litters in the Fall and Spring. It's easier on the females and times the puppies for their development phases to align with trials, fun runs, puppy derby's, hunting seasons, etc.
As you've indicated, you're being selective about breeders. At the same time responsible, well established, breeders are actually pretty selective about clients being considered for a puppy. It may take you a year or so to "get in". I do not personally know any breeders that don't have their litters placed months before they're even born, and none that will place a puppy simply because the person can pay for it.
The Vizsla, while more commonly seen now than 30 years ago, is still not a "common dog". I would expect that it may take you a year, and maybe a few months more, to get a puppy.
GSP's are amazing dogs.I've always liked them as a breed A well bred GSP is capable of anything that should reasonably asked of it. They make great pets, and their reputation in the field has been honestly earned.
Compared to a Vizsla,they are a little bit more aloof and independent. They range farther in the field. They are generally a little bit bigger and more "raw boned". The people I know that have them in the house love having them in the house. They make great "house dogs", and like Vizslas, the "house dog switch" can be turned off and the "hunt mode switch" turned on without missing a beat. They do very well being an integral part of the family.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for allaying my hesitation around a vizsla's separation anxiety. I've just read/heard that they are extremely sensitive. Fingers crossed, a stroke of excellent timing with a great breeder, I may have found my unicorn.

And thank you @organicthoughts for saying that by a year a vizsla can be alone from 8-3. That keeps it real for me as I have talked to breeders who don't seem deterred by the fact we work full-time and yet on other message boards/threads, many say that you must work from home!

I know it takes a while to get a vizsla (my husband jokes that I like to make things difficult as the first dog we had was a Rhodesian Ridgeback, also hard to find; I just couldn't settle on a golden retriever).
 

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I'd look at tweaking your biography a little bit to maybe stand out more. If you have prior dog experience is helpful to list in there. Many Vizsla breeders are heavy into the hunting aspects of the breed, I would at least be willing to explore the world of hunt training and the various events like hunt tests to be mentioned in your email/letter. Something like "While we are not a hunting family, we are interested in exploring together activities such as hunt training and tests as being something that both we and the dog would enjoy doing together". I believe this goes a long way and would help set you apart. I also found breeders are inundated with emails and many times gloss them over. I'd try other methods of getting attention like using postal delivered letter with pictures of the family doing your favorite activities. Sell the environment you will be raising the puppy such as fenced yard, trails nearby you hike or run on, and daily activities you envision doing with the dog.

In a nutshell, you really have to market yourself and family to the breeders to get them thinking of you.
 
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