Hungarian Vizsla Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Generally speaking, is there a difference in temperament between a Vizsla that was bred for the field and one which was bred for show?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Also very curious.
Not trying to hijack...

We're going to be picking up our puppy in 2 weeks from a VERY reputable hunting dog breeder. Wondering if that will affect his house manners.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
The answer is yes, and no.
There are some dogs that can, and do compete in both.
Some showlines have less hunting drive, than the field dogs.
Some field lines are very, very high drive.
In general, hunting lines do not range as far away from you in the field, as field trial lines. You really need to learn more about the dogs bloodlines, not just what venues they compete in.
The good thing, is they should all have been bred to have good temperament. All of the dogs spend more time with family's, than they do in the ring, or field.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
898 Posts
I read this somewhere & have NO personal experience, so I would be glad to hear from someone who does:
A show dog is more likely to be bred for obedience and a field dog for independence. In the ring, a show dog has to listen, but a field dog that has to be told what to do is less effective.
I'm skeptical that breeding has that much to do with it & it's much more about training, but I'd like to hear from those with experience.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
Below is just my generalized opinion, not exact on every dog.


Some of the showlines can have very bold temperaments. It's not just a dog prancing around the ring.
They have to be confident enough to do it with crowds surrounding them, other dogs in the ring, and unknown people coming up putting their hands on them. And stay happy while doing all of this.
Field trial lines should naturally run bigger, and faster than hunting lines. Even though we do keep encouraging them to run even bigger.
They also need enough prey drive, to overcome harsh elements, and not shut down over small things that can happen in the field. Some field trial lines have more brawn in them than others. Field trial dogs can be reined in, for the walking hunters.
But some hunting lines, or show only lines, will never range a half a mile to a mile from you covering ground.
A lot of dogs will have a mix of different lines in them. A lot depends on the breeders goals.

It basically depends on what you're looking for in range, and prey drive.
If the breeder is breeding for the total package, all of the dogs should have good temperament, and be good pets in the home.

I like high drive dogs, but that does not mean everyone does. When they are in a field, they only think of hunting. They could care less about treats, praise or other dogs in the field. They just want to hunt.
In the house they are very sweet, and calm, and relaxed as long as exercised.
But every Vizsla, no matter the bloodlines needs proper mental and physical exercise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
There can be, and as stated, so much depends on the lineage and what the breeder was after.
I've been around show Vizslas, and have spent my adult life with "bred for field" Vizslas. All have been pleasant dogs to be around. Each different, but still having the basic Vizsla "goofball" approach to life.
Put them together to romp around, and there is a difference. Maybe it's genetics, maybe it's training, but you will notice the difference.
It's also not really fair to compare the two, as the conditioning requirements for each discipline are different. If trained and conditioned properly, the "field bred" Vizlsa will more than likely out run and out last a show specific Vizsla, but that is just a generalization. The required physical conditioning for hunting and field trials, will exceed just meeting the basic requirements for conditioning. In this regard, it is the owner/handler effecting the difference, not the dog.
Make no mistake, in the "bred for field" lines there can be dramatic differences in dogs. You might have a nice easy walking hunter, or a just short of being out of control, nitro fueled machine. Both have their place.
Both discipline lines have the pro's and con's. It's really a matter of making the correct decision for you.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,224 Posts
my tuppence worth, seen FTCH dogs, Show dogs etc with all kinds of letters after their pedigree registrations,,get them out hunting and the handlers don't have a clue how to work their dogs to fulfill the "fit for function" ideal, not the dogs faults but I honestly believe that there is a fraternity amongst handlers and judges when it comes to handing out certifcates. Not saying my two are the best working dogs by any means, but I'd put them up against any show or field trialling dog anyday safe in the knowledge that they'd do a good honest full day hunting,pointing and retrieving,,,and that's all I need :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: texasred

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
"safe in the knowledge that they'd do a good honest full day hunting,pointing and retrieving,,,and that's all I need"

Could not have stated it any better my friend.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top