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Hi all-

We have a wonderful little V puppy. 18 weeks on Monday. Like all V's, she's completely nuts with so much wonderful energy. The thing that really bugs me is the excited urination. Luckily, she doesn't do it with me (unless I've been gone a really long time), but with everyone else, as soon as she gets a little attention (even just an excited look will do it), there's pee on the floor.
Typical wisdom says she'll outgrow it or that it'll go away after she's spayed. Others say that folks should be instructed to ignore her until she calms down. But she's a vizsla, she doesn't calm down! Being really exhausted doesn't help either. And I work at a university campus and I take her with me to work several times a week so we can go and walk around campus with all the students (I don't folks pet her much because of this), but mere exposure to lots of folks doesn't seem to make much difference.
Any other tips? Any reassurance that she will, in fact, grow out of it?
 

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Ours did the same, although only when someone came home or visited. It's cute at first but gets a bit annoying because you don't want pee indoors and it's not like you can make the puppy hold it if they're just too excited. Since for us it was when someone got home or just anyone entering the house and he hasn't seen in at least an hour...whoever was coming in, would open the door and let him run out to meet/greet, that way the pee spraying would be outside at least. You'd see little trails of pee on the concrete walkway haha. He did grow out of it eventually around 6 months or so.

Another thing we used to do was, if someone was coming home, they'd call whoever was home and they'd let the dog out before they'd get home. That way his bladder was empty enough that when he greeted the person, he wouldn't let out any pee. When he was younger tho, that didn't work as well.

I've heard people say to just ignore when getting home or when they're getting too excited and you think she's gonna do it. It's hard to do that because they're just so happy to see you. Or maybe just need to take her out more often so she doesn't have much left to sprinkle around.

She will definitely grow out of it but it may take some time. I always attribute it to them being so happy and it makes up for it
 

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Usually, this goes away on its own.

One note: spaying is a leading cause of incontinence in female dogs. Look up spay incontinence. It is well-documented in the veterinary literature and among experienced dog owners.

Bill
 

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I can second the comment left by Spy Car. I have an eight month old female V who, when she was about four months began to pee when either my boyfriend or myself got home after a long day. The tinkling only was only worsened after we had her spayed. I was unaware of the spay incontinence at the time, but I think that is the reason why her tinkling has gotten worse. As far as what we do to help the situation: we walk her straight outside as soon as we get home to let her tinkle outside. That way the pee isn't in the house and we can say our hellos outside.

Good luck with your pup!!
 

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Our Vizsla is 2 and still pees when experiencing any emotion, especially excitement. We were hoping she would put grow it, but it is looking like that might not happen. She has been spayed and I am not sure if it got worse or not after the surgery. Is there something that can be done surgically to fix incontinence?
 

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My V went through that also. Potty training was a long process (up to 5-6 months using no crate) and it seemed like the excited peeing correlated with how full her bladder was when we’d return home (logically).

She did out grow it after 2-3 months as I recall (didn’t spay her until 2yo so that was not a factor). Until she outgrew that phase we also would let her outside greet us outside or we made sure to have a towel in hand to wipe up the wood floors. As they have almost no knowledge that they are even releasing it there are no training approaches of which I’m aware. I recommend just being patient, almost surely your young dog will outgrow it.
 

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Our Vizsla is 2 and still pees when experiencing any emotion, especially excitement. We were hoping she would put grow it, but it is looking like that might not happen. She has been spayed and I am not sure if it got worse or not after the surgery. Is there something that can be done surgically to fix incontinence?
Tasha: that’s a bummer! Do you think she’s getting outside to relieve herself enough? I know that my Vizsla doesn’t have near the capacity that my German Shepard does (he can make 6-8 hrs easy). As my dog is now 3 1/2 yrs I see can go much longer intervals, however, at 2yo I gave her the opportunity every 3-4h.

With my V’s excited peeing definitely correlated somewhat with bladder fullness (fuller bladder=bigger release). You should discuss with vet. Personally I’d avoid any surgical options myself. Vizslas seem somewhat fragile or me and I’m not a fan of any unnecessary surgeries for them.
 

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Our Vizsla is 2 and still pees when experiencing any emotion, especially excitement. We were hoping she would put grow it, but it is looking like that might not happen. She has been spayed and I am not sure if it got worse or not after the surgery. Is there something that can be done surgically to fix incontinence?
Tasha: that’s a bummer! Do you think she’s getting outside to relieve herself enough? I know that my Vizsla doesn’t have near the capacity that my German Shepard does (he can make 6-8 hrs easy). As my dog is now 3 1/2 yrs I see can go much longer intervals, however, at 2yo I gave her the opportunity every 3-4h.

With my V’s excited peeing definitely correlated somewhat with bladder fullness (fuller bladder=bigger release). You should discuss with vet. Personally I’d avoid any surgical options myself. Vizslas seem somewhat fragile or me and I’m not a fan of any unnecessary surgeries for them.
Thanks for your reply - she does get let out a lot both by her asking (we have bells she rings to be let out) and by us asking her to go outside. In fact, she is so good about it that when she is outside wandering I can tell her to go potty and she will pee on command.

We thought that she just had a full bladder, so when we knew someone was coming over we would take her outside to pee. When company showed up she would still pee.
 

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My 5 month old female excited (or submissive?) pees too. I've been trying to figure out her triggers so we can work together to eliminate it. I notice she will pee if we (the humans) make a big deal out of the greeting, i.e. making her sit or letting her "go say hi". She seems to not pee when the humans approach HER quietly, if they remain calm and confident and if they don't really talk to her. Mine does this thing where she rolls onto her back for belly rubs upon greeting. She will more likely pee in this position, than if she were standing on her hind legs when greeting someone. This makes me wonder if it's excited pee or a confidence thing?
 

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My 1.5 year still does this unfortunately too...we ignore it and keep hoping she will grow out of it but it seems that is unlikely to happen.
 

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@Hmpolan, Miksa`s dam did it till she was around 2, then as she matured she outgrew it fully. our breeder did the same as u, just ignore, clean up and move on. They advised their guests to do the same too.
 
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