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Miniature features, were everything is in proportion, or dwarfism where there are deviations in the structure sizes?

I've seen some very small Vizslas but can not recall a dwarfism in any.

Welcome to the HVF. Vizslabirdhunter. I like the name you took. You are now VBH! ;D

RBD
 

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I have never seen one, but we did have a forum member that owned one. I don't think he has posted in a couple of years. He was a member of the Trinity Valley Vizsla club.
I can't think of his name at the moment.
 

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Dumb question alert (and slightly off topic)!

If one were to breed two dwarf vizslas could this then become the beginning of a "miniature vizsla?"

I've never heard of dwarfism within a dog breed but I also haven't ever had a reason to look into it. Now I'm highly intrigued.
 

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I doubt a responsible person would want to breed a dog with dwarfism, it just takes one parent to pass it on. They are more prone to arthritis at a earlier age. In people the life expectance is shorter, I don't know if its the same in dogs.
 

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No responsible breeder would breed two together I would assume, however, there are a number of brainiacs out there who don't care about the breed but about the buck. I guess my question was more so if this is how "miniature" breeds are created? I'll do some looking into it tomorrow to not sidetrack the thread. I play with numbers daily and did terrible in science so genetics and breeding aren't exactly my forte. To the interweb I go for answers...
 

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This just came in though Vizsla Talk list

There are two types of dwarfism, proportionate and non-proportionate, that have been bred for in dogs. The vet said this dog did not have genetic dwarfism because it was not selected for in the dog nor is dwarfism known in the breed. This is often referred to as an “unnatural” occurrence. There is a form of chondrodysplasia in Weims caused by a defect to the pituitary gland that is considered a genetic developmental abnormality and may occur in GSPs. I’ve seen this in GSDs.
 

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Reviving an old post.


ATTENTION Vizsla Breeders/Owners: If you know anyone that owns or has bred a Vizsla with Dwarfism, please share this important message from Dr. Emily Ansel who has been instrumental in getting a research study off the ground. A gene for Dwarfism HAS BEEN IDENTIFIED and we need samples to help validate the test they are working on. Read Emily’s post below for details:

Call for Vizslas with dwarfism (chondrodysplasia) and their parents

I am so excited to share with all of you that huge progress is being made on identification of the gene responsible for dwarfism/chondrodysplasia in Vizslas! Some of you are more familiar with this issue than others. It has been around for a long time, fortunately at low frequency, but it is most definitely here - coast to coast, multiple countries, puppy mill dogs to well-bred dogs. Without a better understanding of inheritance patterns and being able to screen for carriers, I am afraid chondrodysplasia will become more common. Enter Vetgen and some supercomputers across the pond! They have identified a gene and now need our help with test validation efforts. Please, please share the information below with anyone you know with access to a dwarf/chondrodysplastic dog or producer. Vetgen is very responsive via email for any questions about submission. For those I have not met, I am a vizsla owner/handler/infrequent breeder, VCA member, veterinarian and VCA WF vet advisor in NC; if I can do anything to support folks in this effort, feel free to contact me.

Vetgen, on behalf of a collaborative research project, is looking to acquire research samples from Vizslas with dwarfism or parents who have produced a dwarf. The goal is to build on the data around a potentially exciting target mutation in hopes of developing a diagnostic test. It would be especially helpful if this plea could find its way to any owners of dwarf animals placed as pets.

Samples may be 1) blood (about 1-2 ml) in a purple cap tube

2) cheek swabs

3) semen samples

While blood samples are preferred we understand the ease of cheek swabs. Free research kits and submission forms are available through Vetgen ([email protected]) by simply asking for a Vizsla research kit. Alternatively, interdental brushes can be used instead of requesting a kit. There are no special shipping requirements for any sample types.

All samples and results will be kept completely anonymous and confidential. Owners will be notified of any findings after the project is completed.

Whenever possible, a photo of the dog would be helpful. You are welcome to include any other pertinent information that you feel comfortable sharing with the researchers (ie registered name or parents' names, veterinary info, etc.) but this is completely optional.

Samples when ready can be sent directly to:

Vetgen, LLC

3728 Plaza Drive

Ann Arbor, MI

48108

(attn: Rob Loechel) and
 
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