Hungarian Vizsla Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

Registered
Joined
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, just wanted to see if anyone here has any advice on a specific part of crate training...our wee pup Frankie is 12 weeks old today and we have been using a crate since we brought him home at 8 weeks. He is great in the evening and sleeps right through and he is also fine going in for naps during the day, although he doesn鈥檛 really stay in there when the door is open. The main issue we have is that he howls and barks whenever he wakes up and the door is closed (usually after only an hour or so). We have been taking him outside at that point thinking he may need the toilet but more often than not this isn鈥檛 the case.

We are trying to get on a schedule where we can leave him for a couple of hours without him getting distressed when he wakes up, does anyone have any tips or experience of this?

Thanks in advance! 馃槉
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
1,184 Posts
Take him outside after his nap and make sure he goes to the toilet. Then bring him back in and put him back in the crate, and close the door. Hopefully he begins to object to being put back in the crate.
Cover the front of the crate with a towel and let him start complaining. Each time he cries, whines, barks, or howls, gently tap on the front grate of the crate door and reassure him that you are there. He can't see you, but you are conditioning him to be assured that the crate is temporary.
Keep doing this extending the time he is in the crate. It's going to take an investment in your time.
If he's been asleep and wakes up, you do have to get him out the door. Sorry, that's just the nature of puppies.
The last thing you want to deal with is a puppy going to the bathroom in his crate, if you don't have to. ;)
 

Registered
Joined
3 Posts
As Abee has grown older, she wants to be in the crate as little as possible, for the full velcro experience. However, she is crated for bed time and has been since her first day. We also crate her when we go out, or when we can't supervise her, because she can be overly exuberant left to her own devices, e.g., torturing the cat.
One thing I read early on was a key point regarding crating. When they whimper / squeal / nose-whistle or, heaven forbid, bark, if you let them out to be with you, they have got you. Once you give in, they know exactly how to get out of the crate, and they will make the most pathetic noises one can imagine. Even your visiting the crate is a reward for them, for which they will cry.
So, when Abee whimpers to get out of the crate, that's an automatic trip outside to potty. Then she goes back in. When it's time to let her out in the a.m., or after returning home, we never do it when she's on a whimpering jag. She has also learned how to be quiet to get what she wants. :) Good luck.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top