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@Geizo I don’t think anyone is trying to dissuade you, just give you info based on our experiences . Every dog is different and there are such things as mellow V’s . You just never know what you will get as a puppy so it is best to be prepared for the whole spectrum of possibilities.
To be brutally honest, and not trying to be offensive.
I am wondering if I am reading too much input from Americans, is everything overly dramatic.

E.g I dont know anyone with a Vizsla. But I do know people with Beagles and they are fine. But reading on the internet does not give that idea.
 

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@Geizo It may be regional or cultural in terms of how people respond to such questions. Perhaps it is even how breeding may be different in different parts of the world in terms of how that region's overal V population's disposition is. It is quite possible in your area Vizslas are bred to be more family friendly versus here in the US were most breeders that I researched were heavily into breeding for hunting and hunt competitions. They will bred for good temperament, high energy, and drive and generally do not breed for mellow family pets. Here they are not very common family pet only and most often are family pets with hunting involved. More recently that is changing as the breed becomes more popular.

Speak with the breeders and ask what traits they breed for. Maybe even ask for references from past litters and ask those owners how their dogs are. If the breeder breeds for hunting, most likely you will get the high energy and drive V that perhaps can be more maintenance than one not bred for that. Of course all V's will still have that instinct to be aware of.
 

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“While they all look cute in the puppy pictures, all bloodlines are not the same.”

Not sure if you remembered the above sentence, from one my first responses to your post. Without writing a book on bloodlines, it’s hard to explain how much they contribute to an individual Vizsla. Even when explained, it only makes sense after meeting them in person.
Health, temperament, structure, prey drive, and even how far they will range away from you, are different in different bloodlines.
While I love them all, I prefer the bigger running, higher prey drive ones. That is just my preference as a hunter.
 

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I have a small city apartment and I work from home 2-4 days a week. Our 14 month old V goes to doggy daycare twice a week and I take her to the office at least once a week.

Much like any dog, if you put effort in it, it’ll work. I took the first two weeks off when we got her as a puppy, but after that she was crated for several 2H naps while we worked until she was old enough to nap on her own (about 12 months). Crate training really worked wonders combined with working from home. But you need to be able to keep a flexible schedule because your going to take care of a baby for the first 6 months.

You have to realize that having a small apartment, as well as working 8h/day means that you have to spend EVERY WEEKEND and preferably 1 or 2 evenings exercising your V. As an addition to normal daily walks. An with exercise I mean: off-leash running and mental work. I strongly recommend taking obedience or hunting classes because they mentally tire your dog out as well. Besides that, and maybe compared to less energetic breeds this would be the difference: you cannot ‘just’ walk them 2-3 times a day for 20 minutes. They need exercise instead of walks, mentally and physically. Doggy daycare helps a lot, because they need less exercise the day after.

With weekend hikes, doggy daycare and obedience training, our V easily spends her day sleeping around and with short walks. Without the effort, we honestly would’ve not managed.

We have a V that was NOT bred for field work nor shows. We have her from a breeder that specifically breeds for households. Also, we have the laziest one from the nest. So, at the least - this is what to expect from a lazy V.
 

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We have a pretty Mellow V as well, we asked for the calmest one in litter….. and he also ended up being the biggest. He is right around 70 lbs. haha. His littermate that we still see and dog sit is about 40lbs. Anyways, she has a lot more energy than our V. When we first got our pup he was a lot to handle and there were a lot of days I had wondered what I had gotten myself into. Around 6 months he got alot better and then from 12-18 months he chilled out a-lot. Now he is almost 3 and is very mellow. There are a lot of times I will take him for a run and he’s done after about 2 miles. I like to think we traded size for energy level. I have been really pleasantly surprised with his energy. He is still a little spastic around kids, even though I have 3 kids at home. He always gets a little wound up when their friends come over. We are still working on that. Overall though he’s been so great. Just wanted to give you another vote of confidence that you can do it! Sounds like you have a lot of time to devote to him which is exactly what your pup will need.
 

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I have never commented on anything before but feel quite strongly about this particular topic. My husband wanted a V, I definitely didn’t. The more I read the more horrified I became by the breed. We have a 1,3 and 5 year old. There was no way I was going to introduce this difficult breed into their lives. But I was convinced by him that ours would be different?! He was RIGHT!!!!!! Chester is amazing. He’s 8 months and nothing like google would lead you to believe. He has never chewed anything, we don’t go up mountains with him ever and he fits in with us (perfectly!). I feel sad that so many people are put off by this breed. Our experience has been nothing short of amazing. He is the perfect family dog and we adore him. Please go for it. You won’t regret it.
 

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Hi all,

I have been considering getting a dog for some time and after a lot of research decided on a Vizsla. I love that they are athletic dogs that will run\hike with me. In fact I was about to get one last weekend but chickened out.
Basically I read a lot on this forum and became fearful the Vizsla would be too much and I wouldnt be able to give it every thing it needed.
Hoping someone with experience can evaluate my situation and determine if I am unsuitable.

I live alone in a 3 bed house with a small to medium sized back garden ( completely enclosed).
The dog will be an indoor dog of course. I worry a bit is it a big big.
I work from home average 3 days a week. For other two days I would plan to give Viszla to my mother ( will it be too much for older person). Alternatively on some of the days I may have to get someone to drop in twice a day.
Plan would be to give the dog 1 - 2 hours exercise on the weekdays(running\walks) and 4-8 hours on Saturday and Sunday(hikes\run).
Although I work from home 3 days a week. I do work hard, a lot of meetings etc. Will I manage a puppy has been another concern.

All in all, I had heart set on Vizsla but reading the internet has put me off. At the same time I look at my neighbors dog who just sits out the backyard barking all day\everyday and think I can provide a dog with a life a million times better.
I wonder am I doing myself an injustice by not going for it.

Thanks for any response.
 

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I wanted to add a few things to consider. Like everyone had said. They are a fun filled ride in the puppy stage! With that being said. I worked with a breeder to get what she considered the most calm male of the litter. I had certain qualities I was looking for and was able to successfully work with my breeder to get a puppy that fit those. It takes time and patience but is so worth it. He is very much Velcro but not nearly as active as multiple other V’s we are friends with. As a puppy I tend to think schedules and patience are the two best things to apply. He is now almost 3 and has adapted to our schedules and while we focus on brain work daily along with exercises he has proven that not all V’s are crazy energetic. As an example. He puts himself to bed around 6 pm. Out cold next to us usually on top of someone’s lap. When we actually go to bed he goes out around 8;30. then into his crate. He will sleep until 7 in the morning g and at time I have to make him go out. Then back to sleep until around 9. We walk 2-3 miles or he goes to his trainer 3 days a week to pack walk with 6-10 other dogs for 3 hours. Plays a bit and comes home to sleep for a few hours. He sits next to me in his chair while I work until 4-5 when it’s dinner time. After that it’s a few hours of play and command training. At 6 he usually finds the couch and lights out! I outline this all to tell you that each dog is different. They need brain work and structure and most will adapt. Ours has never chewed anything other than his toys, he definitely had sharkies as a puppy but grew out of that around 5-6 mo. He also definitely had an adolescent period with not listening but with consistency and patience all was ok. I waited 15 years to get my dream dog. Eli. Give it time and have patience
 

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Hi all,

I have been considering getting a dog for some time and after a lot of research decided on a Vizsla. I love that they are athletic dogs that will run\hike with me. In fact I was about to get one last weekend but chickened out.
Basically I read a lot on this forum and became fearful the Vizsla would be too much and I wouldnt be able to give it every thing it needed.
Hoping someone with experience can evaluate my situation and determine if I am unsuitable.

I live alone in a 3 bed house with a small to medium sized back garden ( completely enclosed).
The dog will be an indoor dog of course. I worry a bit is it a big big.
I work from home average 3 days a week. For other two days I would plan to give Viszla to my mother ( will it be too much for older person). Alternatively on some of the days I may have to get someone to drop in twice a day.
Plan would be to give the dog 1 - 2 hours exercise on the weekdays(running\walks) and 4-8 hours on Saturday and Sunday(hikes\run).
Although I work from home 3 days a week. I do work hard, a lot of meetings etc. Will I manage a puppy has been another concern.

All in all, I had heart set on Vizsla but reading the internet has put me off. At the same time I look at my neighbors dog who just sits out the backyard barking all day\everyday and think I can provide a dog with a life a million times better.
I wonder am I doing myself an injustice by not going for it.

Thanks for any response.
I would totally get one! I love mine and yes they have lots of energy but it sounds like you have a great plan for exercising it! I wouldn’t recommend having your mom take care of him because even as a puppy they get the “zoomies” which is basically when they have a lot of energy and run around crazy. It sounds like you’ve also done a great amount of research and to be honest you sound pretty prepared for what’s coming. Puppyhood is always tough but they're easily trained! On top of that they’re constantly touching you! So if you’re looking for an affectionate dog they’re top of the list. But honestly they’re just big goof balls who love you more than anything! So yes, I would definitely recommend getting one.
 

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I regularly put GPS collars on mine when out hunting, or them just running the field. One covers more ground than the other. Shine averages about 10- 12 miles, the other dogs 7-9 miles. I have no idea the miles I put on my boots, but it’s no where near that.
There is a big gap between the miles we walk, and the miles a dog can cover when off leash.
 

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Hi all,

I have been considering getting a dog for some time and after a lot of research decided on a Vizsla. I love that they are athletic dogs that will run\hike with me. In fact I was about to get one last weekend but chickened out.
Basically I read a lot on this forum and became fearful the Vizsla would be too much and I wouldnt be able to give it every thing it needed.
Hoping someone with experience can evaluate my situation and determine if I am unsuitable.

I live alone in a 3 bed house with a small to medium sized back garden ( completely enclosed).
The dog will be an indoor dog of course. I worry a bit is it a big big.
I work from home average 3 days a week. For other two days I would plan to give Viszla to my mother ( will it be too much for older person). Alternatively on some of the days I may have to get someone to drop in twice a day.
Plan would be to give the dog 1 - 2 hours exercise on the weekdays(running\walks) and 4-8 hours on Saturday and Sunday(hikes\run).
Although I work from home 3 days a week. I do work hard, a lot of meetings etc. Will I manage a puppy has been another concern.

All in all, I had heart set on Vizsla but reading the internet has put me off. At the same time I look at my neighbors dog who just sits out the backyard barking all day\everyday and think I can provide a dog with a life a million times better.
I wonder am I doing myself an injustice by not going for it.

Thanks for any response.
Puppyhood was a challenge for us! We were new dog owners with so much to learn. But now that our girl is 18 months old we’ve settled into a routine much like the one you describe you’ll be able to offer. We walk or run her her in the morning, she eats and settles in for her morning nap while one of us works nearby, she goes out for a short break at lunch time (maybe a walk around the block) and settles in for the rest of the afternoon napping until quitting time, then we’re off for our second journey of the day. On days we work away from home we take her to a doggie daycare where she plays much of the day (we have a tired girl on these evenings). I don’t know about other vizslas but our girl loves routine—she likes knowing the next step in her day. Oh, one thing that helps with important meetings at work Is that she is crate trained and we can let her nap in her crate in the other room when we need no distractions.
 

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I think the fact you are conscious of a vizslas needs shows that you will be an good vizsla owner. No dog/puppy is easy. But the way some people talk about what a vizsla ‘needs’ makes me think that only unemployed, land owners who love to hunt and will never leave the dog unattended can/should own one - Which is a load of bull!! Your set up sounds fine, your excercise plan also sounds decent and im sure you’ll amend it to whatever works for you and your pup! Don’t be put off :)

my background is mainly with German pointers (grew up with them as family dogs) and we’ve recently got our first pointer/vizsla cross 4 weeks ago and he’s great!
 
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