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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have been considering getting a dog for some time and after a lot of research decided on a Vizsla. I love that they are athletic dogs that will run\hike with me. In fact I was about to get one last weekend but chickened out.
Basically I read a lot on this forum and became fearful the Vizsla would be too much and I wouldnt be able to give it every thing it needed.
Hoping someone with experience can evaluate my situation and determine if I am unsuitable.

I live alone in a 3 bed house with a small to medium sized back garden ( completely enclosed).
The dog will be an indoor dog of course. I worry a bit is it a big big.
I work from home average 3 days a week. For other two days I would plan to give Viszla to my mother ( will it be too much for older person). Alternatively on some of the days I may have to get someone to drop in twice a day.
Plan would be to give the dog 1 - 2 hours exercise on the weekdays(running\walks) and 4-8 hours on Saturday and Sunday(hikes\run).
Although I work from home 3 days a week. I do work hard, a lot of meetings etc. Will I manage a puppy has been another concern.

All in all, I had heart set on Vizsla but reading the internet has put me off. At the same time I look at my neighbors dog who just sits out the backyard barking all day\everyday and think I can provide a dog with a life a million times better.
I wonder am I doing myself an injustice by not going for it.

Thanks for any response.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have been watching\reading non stop vizsla stuff for last week.
But everytime I decide to go for it I think non, they will be too much.
 

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I've known Vizslas that lived in small apartments and condo's in Boston and Manhattan. They seemed to adapt quite well to their situation. I know of one that was raised pretty much on a boat. A lot though will depend on the individual Vizsla itself.
Your meeting schedule will not be a problem for an adult Vizsla. It will take work on your part to get through the first 12-18 months ,or so, with the puppy.
 

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Is there any way that you could attend some local vizsla meet ups / hunting events / club events etc? So that you can spend time with the dogs, talk to owners and breeders in person. A lot of the fine details are much more useful to experience in person, alongside with the reading you are already doing.

When you say you were about to get one last weekend, you mean it was a puppy? i am just checking as usually good breeders have along wait list, and it is often not even easy to get on to those lists (in order to protect the breed) so just the possibility of getting one puppy over the weekend sounds a little concerning.

The puppy age is the one where you will need most probably some external help if you work full time, but with training and some maturing that can be bridged in my experience.
 

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If you are alone, a V puppy from my experience even with working from home all 5 days a week would be really tough if you have a very busy work schedule. Ellie is now 10mos+ and when I'm alone with her while working, it is doable even when I'm on back to back web meetings for a few hours. She mostly sleeps under my desk with occasional nose bumps and looking for attention. Otherwise she knows the deal that she has to wait until lunch for our daily hour off leash hike.

It would be asking a lot to have an older person watch a young V puppy all day in my opinion. You would be better off with setting up a puppy daycare type service for the days that you work.

The first 2-6 months I couldn't imagine being stuck with a V pup and with a busy work schedule. You really can't turn your back on them at this age and they demand a lot of attention when not nap time. Maybe if you can puppy proof your work room, have tons of toys, and you aren't on exclusive work calls where you can't mute for a bit and take breaks to give attention/training it may be doable.

All that being said, it sounds like a V would love to have you as an owner.
 

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Yes you should really consider carefuly. Our female V is 6 months old and she demands a lot of attention and training. Luckily my wife is pregnant and due to pandemics she stays at home with our V most of the time. We do have some space for her to keep busy and I always take her for long walks.
She is turning into a very clever and affectionate dog, that actually respects the house rules (most of the time).
But it took a huge amount of work and even more patience.
Bottomline: the first 5 months are kind of tiring so make sure you are ready to face it. It is totally worth of course, but far from easy.
 

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By the way, if i get it right, you expect to leave your V puppy with an elder person. This is definetely a no go, unless your mother is a "dog person"
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
By the way, if i get it right, you expect to leave your V puppy with an elder person. This is definetely a no go, unless your mother is a "dog person"
Well, she regularly looks after two kids under 5 together.

Id hope a Vizsla wouldnt be more work then that?. If they are Ill certainly rethink as I know what kids that age are like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When you say you were about to get one last weekend, you mean it was a puppy? i am just checking as usually good breeders have along wait list, and it is often not even easy to get on to those lists (in order to protect the breed) so just the possibility of getting one puppy over the weekend sounds a little concerning.
Maybe not in big demand here. Dogs were from registered breeder and no waiting list.
 

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Well, she regularly looks after two kids under 5 together.

Id hope a Vizsla wouldnt be more work then that?. If they are Ill certainly rethink as I know what kids that age are like.
it is true young children can be a lot of work, but a V puppy or any pup for that matter is not comparable. She has experience in raising children that she can draw on. Unless she has had experience in raising sporting dog puppies I’d be cautious. Also if the young kids will be around the V puppy at the same time that is like mixing fire and gunpowder together.
 

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Just my thoughts.
Vizslas can live almost anywhere, if they have a owner that’s dedicated to for filling their needs. They are so smart, and athletic. Both the mind and body need daily exercise. They are not a walk around the block dog, that’s going to just chill at home. Plan on being up a hour, or two early, before work starts. Your lunch time is about doing puppy things, and grabbing something quick to eat. As soon as work is over, it’s about the puppy again. Add to this getting up during the middle of the night, because you pup needs to potty. Or sometimes it’s just howling, because it wants you. It’s a puppy, and does not care if your suppose to be working, or your sleep deprived.
You want to go out with friends. Sorry, the pups needs come first. They basically eat up any free time, you thought you had. Once you get passed the puppy stage, and think your home free. Some months down the road, adolescent vizsla behavior appears. It’s where they test all the boundaries, and act like a teenage kid. Pull on leash like a sled dog. Run off playing, and won’t come to you. Chew on things, that you know you taught them not too. Eventually we get to the adult well-trained Vizsla, IF we have put in all the hard work, to get them to that point. If not we have a adult dog, that acts like a adolescent one.
Basically you get out of a vizsla, what you put into them.
Researching the breed on the Internet is good, but it still does not fully prepare you.
Honestly researching a good breeder, can take months/years. While they all look cute in the puppy pictures, all bloodlines are not the same. Even good breeders, are definitely not the same. But bad breeders do have a lot in common.
Goals are different from breeder, to breeder. What is acceptable to one, it’s not to another.

I could buy a new vizsla puppy every week.
Pet stores, puppy mills, high volume breeders with known health, and temperament problems sell them like hot cakes. And yes they are registered puppies. Have you looked into all the health testing that vizsla should have before being bred?
But to buy a well bred, proven, health tested bloodlines, high in demand vizsla puppy can take up to a year, or more. Once in a while you get lucky, and it’s months.
 
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Well, she regularly looks after two kids under 5 together.

Id hope a Vizsla wouldnt be more work then that?. If they are Ill certainly rethink as I know what kids that age are like.
You might want to look up some of the young kids, with vizsla puppy posts.
 
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They are not more work than young kids.
They are more like trying to potty train a toddler, that runs a lot faster. Gets into every thing, but has needle sharp teeth. Those tiny little teeth break the skin, rip clothes, and chew anything that will fit in their mouth.
Unlike kids, we can put them in a crate. Go run errands without them. 😁
When you mix vizsla puppies with young kids. You get shrieking kids, because the puppy is nipping them, jumping up on them, and chewing up their toys. It’s all play to the puppy, and kids screaming, waving hands, running from them, just excited them more.
The combination might be more than a senior person wants to take on. Some people are able to do it, and others rehome the puppy. Then you have the ones that just leave them endless in the backyard, like your neighbor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You might want to look up some of the young kids, with vizsla puppy posts.
Seems there is some misunderstanding here.
The Viszla wont be around young kids much at all, if ever.

I would never leave a dog with someone who was minding kids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just my thoughts.
Vizslas can live almost anywhere, if they have a owner that’s dedicated to for filling their needs. They are so smart, and athletic. Both the mind and body need daily exercise. They are not a walk around the block dog, that’s going to just chill at home. Plan on being up a hour, or two early, before work starts. Your lunch time is about doing puppy things, and grabbing something quick to eat. As soon as work is over, it’s about the puppy again. Add to this getting up during the middle of the night, because you pup needs to potty. Or sometimes it’s just howling, because it wants you. It’s a puppy, and does not care if your suppose to be working, or your sleep deprived.
You want to go out with friends. Sorry, the pups needs come first. They basically eat up any free time, you thought you had. Once you get passed the puppy stage, and think your home free. Some months down the road, adolescent vizsla behavior appears. It’s where they test all the boundaries, and act like a teenage kid. Pull on leash like a sled dog. Run off playing, and won’t come to you. Chew on things, that you know you taught them not too. Eventually we get to the adult well-trained Vizsla, IF we have put in all the hard work, to get them to that point. If not we have a adult dog, that acts like a adolescent one.
Basically you get out of a vizsla, what you put into them.
Researching the breed on the Internet is good, but it still does not fully prepare you.
Honestly researching a good breeder, can take months/years. While they all look cute in the puppy pictures, all bloodlines are not the same. Even good breeders, are definitely not the same. But bad breeders do have a lot in common.
Goals are different from breeder, to breeder. What is acceptable to one, it’s not to another.

I could buy a new vizsla puppy every week.
Pet stores, puppy mills, high volume breeders with known health, and temperament problems sell them like hot cakes. And yes they are registered puppies. Have you looked into all the health testing that vizsla should have before being bred?
But to buy a well bred, proven, health tested bloodlines, high in demand vizsla puppy can take up to a year, or more. Once in a while you get lucky, and it’s months.
Thanks for response.

I have had other dogs before, I had two labradors when I was young. They were hard work at times but well worth it and nothing that would put me off getting another. I also had a mungrel who died. Is a Vizsla a million miles away?
The more I read the more I am thinking I should avoid, but I dont know if its just the internet over exaggerating things.

The one difference here, this would be first dog I ever purchased. Breeder looking for 1800 euro range. All other dogs were free.
 

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Thanks for response.

I have had other dogs before, I had two labradors when I was young. They were hard work at times but well worth it and nothing that would put me off getting another. I also had a mungrel who died. Is a Vizsla a million miles away?
The more I read the more I am thinking I should avoid, but I dont know if its just the internet over exaggerating things.

The one difference here, this would be first dog I ever purchased. Breeder looking for 1800 euro range. All other dogs were free.
My nephew trains hunting labs for a living.
He has said One vizsla can tire out three labs during play time. This is with them playing with each of the Labs separately.
People either love having a vizsla, or they become frustrated with them.
I love being outdoors in big open fields with them. Going places to train with them, and then having them draped across my lap.
They are beautiful, high energy, graceful, smart dogs. They want/need to be a big part of your life. If you like those things, they are the perfect breed. If you don’t, the smart, high energy, need to be with you becomes frustrating, for both you and the dog. Then they act out, and become destructive.
I don’t know the going price in your country, or area. One to cheap is always a red flag. There are some bad breeders that charge really high prices.
You could buy from a reputable breeder for less.
See if you have any vizsla clubs in your area. Most of them can guide you towards a reputable breeder. If they have meet ups, go meet the breed in person.
 

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Hi all,

I have been considering getting a dog for some time and after a lot of research decided on a Vizsla. I love that they are athletic dogs that will run\hike with me. In fact I was about to get one last weekend but chickened out.
Basically I read a lot on this forum and became fearful the Vizsla would be too much and I wouldnt be able to give it every thing it needed.
Hoping someone with experience can evaluate my situation and determine if I am unsuitable.

I live alone in a 3 bed house with a small to medium sized back garden ( completely enclosed).
The dog will be an indoor dog of course. I worry a bit is it a big big.
I work from home average 3 days a week. For other two days I would plan to give Viszla to my mother ( will it be too much for older person). Alternatively on some of the days I may have to get someone to drop in twice a day.
Plan would be to give the dog 1 - 2 hours exercise on the weekdays(running\walks) and 4-8 hours on Saturday and Sunday(hikes\run).
Although I work from home 3 days a week. I do work hard, a lot of meetings etc. Will I manage a puppy has been another concern.

All in all, I had heart set on Vizsla but reading the internet has put me off. At the same time I look at my neighbors dog who just sits out the backyard barking all day\everyday and think I can provide a dog with a life a million times better.
I wonder am I doing myself an injustice by not going for it.

Thanks for any response.
Hi! I’m Monika, I work from home like you maybe. Some times I have long meetings and some days I’m off because I have to go on visits. I’m a mother of 3 kids, one that is very scared of dogs (he likes then but not that close, he’s 7). My first dog was a cocker spaniel, I was 19. And since then I had a Labrador, a Great Dane, a golden retriever, 2 pointers (brothers) and a Collie.( All of them from puppy to senior). Now We have a vizsla, Hunter. He’s 5 months and is very very active. But! He sleeps a lot. In the morning he wakes up at 7 am and we go outside to pee… he doesn’t like to go alone. So it’s raining or snowing we have to go outside early in the morning. Then he eat breakfast and go to sleep again… some days he sleeps until 12! Kiddos in school an I’m working so he can relax. Then he’s very active at lunch, he eats 3 times per day, and at 2 pm I take time to play with him some times indoor (weather can be challenge here so we try chase ball or any toy, and training lessons, smart games, etc). Of course I go to pick the kids at school and make lunch. After playing he sleeps a nap. Sometimes very long ones. And at 6 pm he’s active again! And this time is very energetic so we go for walks and runs, then we play inside with the kids so then can get use to the puppy inside the house, they were use to old dogs only. Then he eat dinner and plays more inside and sleeps as an angel all night. He sleeps in the kitchen. The first 2 days he cryed at night after that nothing.
Of course we have a lot of toys so he can chase them indoors and play. Here is very cold and he came in winter. (Sorry if it’s too long or not the right words, Spanish native here)
For me (my husband works away several days so I’m responsable of the puppy) if I have to compare with other breed that I had (puppy to senior) this vizsla pup is definitely more indoor dog. He’s more like a little kid, and Velcro as is said. He is hard to get tired but is not impossible. His first walk to the park was so funny, after 30 min I had to take him up because he got tired. And came home in my arms like a baby. 😅
The point here is that if I can manage to do all home stuff, 3 kids, and a puppy and work you can too! I’m sure that you would be perfect for a vizsla. They are more person dog. More Velcro and I love that. He’s my baby and he’s so smart and learn so fast. And he needs to be challenge, to learn tricks… of course he eats stuffs, take the kiddos toys and shoes like any dog. And chew the dinner table, destroy 2 dog beds… like a normal puppy. And if you had dogs before you now they need time just like a little kid. And a lot of toys, snacks, good quality food, etc.
The thing is please don’t be afraid, I think they are smarter than other breeds and perfect company. And the only person outside my house that I trust to care of him is my ant. She’s 68 years old, a dog lover, and she can spend all day with him and they bond perfect. He behaves better I think with her 😅
I really love this breed. First time having a vizsla and before having Hunter didn’t knew a V in person. I’m 43, not very fitness mom. Just a regular mom. We like go hiking in weekends and beach walks or the park. If you feel you can offer any dog a caring home and if you think a V is the dog for you go for it! 🧡
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi! I’m Monika
Thanks so much for you response Monika. Great information and much appreciated.

I had almost given up on idea on Vizsla based on reading, but your post has opened it back up somewhat.

Also, I began to look at Beagles as alternative but got similar communities dissuading me!. I am left thinking if this is just a thing among dog owners or if Vizsla really are that difficult.
Certainly if you manage 3 kids on top of a Vizsla it gives me great confidence.
 

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Thanks so much for you response Monika. Great information and much appreciated.

I had almost given up on idea on Vizsla based on reading, but your post has opened it back up somewhat.

Also, I began to look at Beagles as alternative but got similar communities dissuading me!. I am left thinking if this is just a thing among dog owners or if Vizsla really are that difficult.
Certainly if you manage 3 kids on top of a Vizsla it gives me great confidence.
Look, im at the computer now and Hunter is like this (pictureattached). He´s very smart and he only needs someone close. Ad he need to sleep in a room with no distractiones so he can really rest, you can reach about crate training as well. If I can help with anything let me know. Hunter has an insta! @hunter_the_vzsl
And my uncle has a beagle... and they are hard to keep inside, very anxious. He got it older because the original family gave in adoption, it was too much energy and destruction they said.
I tell you this because oir older dogs pass last year, and this time i wanted a small dog to be inside. But then Hunter came and I really think he is the perfect dog to be inside the house and around the kids. They are so smart that im impress every day. And I have a lot of other dogs breeds that we owned to compare. You won´t regret, I want to some day have another one. Just in love with vizslas. :love:
 

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@Geizo I don’t think anyone is trying to dissuade you, just give you info based on our experiences . Every dog is different and there are such things as mellow V’s . You just never know what you will get as a puppy so it is best to be prepared for the whole spectrum of possibilities.
 
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