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Discussion Starter #1
I could use some feedback and advice.

We have a nearly 2 year old V, Ronan. He drives us to distraction, but is the sweetest, friendliest, most loving dog you could ever hope to have. My five year old literally uses him as a pillow, and he just sighs with happiness. We have a nearly 7 year old Golden who Ronan considers his play toy/pillow/best friend.

We recently discovered that a pure-bred 7 year old V had been taken to the Humane Society in our town. I recognized his name from several lost dog entries on Craigslist. Turns out his owners never trained him, don't walk him, do everything wrong you can do with a V. He can easily clear a 6 foot fence, and I guess they gave up. He is listed as a destructive chewer and an obsessive humper. (He is neutered.)

My head is telling me that I'm nuts, but my heart is telling me to go get that poor dog. We would have some real work dealing with the fence jumping, as our HOA would not allow a fence that would keep him in. My husband trains for triathlons and I train for half-marathons, so exercise would not be a problem. However, my husband is nearing the end of a year long deployment and will not be home for over a month. I can only walk one of the dogs at a time. We talked about a tie out in the dog run so the V at the pound could be outside with the other dogs at play time.

So, my question is, would you bring the new V home, knowing the issues that we would face. Any ideas why he would be an "excessive humper"? Is this a boredom related thing? Ronan, my V, is super high energy and super destructive. I know he has to be in his crate if we leave the house, and we go through dog beds like toilet paper. It's just something I accept about him. I would not be caught dead without toys and rawhides. I cannot imagine leaving him to hope to find a new home. I'm afraid emotion is overcoming common sense. Any words of wisdom from the veterans?

Thank you!
 

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A friend of mine has an English Setter with wanderlust and even though he has a fenced yard, she was over it any time she wanted. His solution was to get an Invisible Fence and that has taught her to stay put.
 

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You have a big heart :) Kudos to you for considering this fellow for adoption. Only you can decide if you have the time, energy, & money to take on a V with issues. Are you prepared to install & pay for an invisible fence or e-collar for a dog you have not yet bonded with? Will you resent having to possibly pay for other needs such as professional training? What if the new V upsets the balance with your 2 dogs, and they begin to show stress because of it? Do you know this Vs history with children? Many shelter dogs are great with children; however, I always assume dogs who have not been socialized around kids or history is not known are unpredictable. A chance I can't afford to take for my children's sake AND the dogs. I have always understood obsessive humping to be a insecurity &/or dominance issue. Stressed behavior. Don't know if that is correct, but it is a behavior that can be unsettling & dangerous. It can cause dog fights &/or injury for the "humpee" if it is aggressive or forceful to the hips/joints. You obviously know these things, so I just think it's so important to use sense and not your heart when making a decision. It would be horrible for you, family, & dogs if bringing this V into your home has unintended consequences. Also, it would be unfair to the V if you decide he's too much. It's terrible for a dog to be shuffled around even with great intentions. Another option is to contact Vizsla rescues to put the word out about him needing a home asap. In my unprofessional opinion, I think this V would do best in a very special environment (no more than one dog and no children). I'm not saying you couldn't provide a great home, because it sounds like you have a lot to offer; however, it also sounds like you are waivering. I think you need to be 100% sure about taking this V. I hope it all works out. Best wishes with your decision & prayers for the V.
 

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Agree with kellygh completely. You obviously have a big heart and a willingness to help this poor fellow. Bear in mind, though, that one of the worst things you can do is to take him and then later decide that it's not going to work out.

If you DO decide to take him consider it a serious commitment for the life of the dog, with no "do-overs". Be in it for the long term! I am a volunteer with the Michigan Humane Society, and I know that every time a shelter dog has to be rehomed, the chances of successful integration into a permanent home are diminished. So for everybody's sake, if you take him, commit to him and promise him you will keep him, no matter what.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you so much kellygh and mswhipple! I have sent an e-mail to the Colorado V Rescue group, and I have offered to do whatever I can to help. I will gladly pick this poor boy up and get him to the people who can make sure he is in the right place. I just don't think at this point in time my family is the place for him.

I greatly appreciate your replies which helped bring me some clarity. Sometimes the heart is louder than the head. You would have thought I'd remember that from my dating days! LOL.
 

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You will find that the two V's together will entertain each other. That means less attention required from you!. My husband has trained older Vizsla dogs before to hunt and with time they have turned into some great dogs. Vizslas are known for being smart and for wanting to please you, both of these things make them very trainable, even at an older age. I have never had one as old as the one you are describing, but I have a hard time believing you couldn't work some things out of him. I think you could even train to not hump, especially because he is fixed. I tend to think that is a habit thing, not hormonal in this case.

Good Luck
 

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I have sent an e-mail to the Colorado V Rescue group, and I have offered to do whatever I can to help. I will gladly pick this poor boy up and get him to the people who can make sure he is in the right place. I just don't think at this point in time my family is the place for him.
Great plan and you offering to help is the best you could do. Big hearts are what rescue is all about.

http://redbirddog.blogspot.com/2009/09/what-vizsla-rescue-is-about.html
 

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Fantastic idea, especially after experiencing the Vizsla breed.
2 are sweet if you have the time and money. 8)
 
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