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My 2 year old will not obey or even really learn this command. She see's the gate open and bolts at least every other week. 2-3 blocks away, really frustrating.
Not sure how attack this to get some success? Tried a lead etc, walks.....I see that look in her eys and gone. I have a collar but have not used it yet.
 

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maybe you're communicating it wrong, what kind of basic training regime did she have?
 

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That does sound frustrating! I would break this down in to two separate skills: recall and waiting at doorways/gates. For both, I think you'll have the most success starting your training inside where there are fewer distractions. I'd also suggest implementing more rules around the house as a way to teach her impulse control and to reclaim your role as her leader. I think Nothing in Life is Free is the training method I've seen referenced for this kind of idea to teach your dog to "earn" whatever the reward is by first offering up a desirable behavior. Sitting and waiting to be released before getting to eat would be one example.

So... let's start with waiting at doorways which will eventually translate to waiting at the gate. Starting now you (and anyone else that lives with you) is going to assert your rights to go through every door in your home before she does. It might feel petty or weird, but just do it. Assuming she's like most Vs and constantly following you around this should be easy to do casually throughout your day and offleash. If you want to though, you can leash her up and do this as dedicated training sessions of 10 minutes or whatever. Approach a door and if she goes through first call her back, tell her to sit, stay, and then go through the door yourself. If she moves before you've released her then back up, make her sit again, and repeat until it's right. Additionally, you can also just block her physically from getting by you and then only let her pass once you're through. Then praise her like she was going to do the right thing on her own anyway.

So do this inside and also when you're letting her outside. Once you're seeing good progress where she's starting to wait automatically, you want to up the difficulty by adding in a new variable. I'd suggest putting her on a leash and standing back a couple feet so she can't fail and then throw a toy or a treat through the doorway. Then work up to being able to throw the toy with her off leash again. Next variable would be do it with the door to your backyard. Anytime you add in a new variable you want to drop down the difficulty in another area, so in this case put her back on the leash. Now do the same thing all over with the gate. If you have any questions on this, let me know, otherwise one final thing is that I trained my dog in a similar way in her first year at home, but I don't require it of her or need to require it all the time now. The foundation is there and I can tap into which has been helpful in lots of situations.

Okay, now recall. Again do this inside first and I'd stock up on a lot of high value treats. It sounds like she already has some foundation for "come," but that she has selective hearing when something more exciting tempts her. Even if she readily comes to you when called, start acting like she's discovered the vaccine for covid and just shower her with praise and some of those treats when she does. If she ignores you then don't get upset, just go to her, leash her up, walk back to where you were, and then praise her like she did it on her own. Considering your past frustrations with her lack of recall she may have some negative associations with coming to you that you can now work on reprogramming.

Same as with teaching her to wait at doors, once she progresses you're going to add in a new variable. It sounds like you have a fenced backyard, if not find an enclosed outdoor space for the next variable. I'd purchase a long line, maybe 30 feet or so long, and clip that to her collar. This is what you'll use to make it easier to catch her should she choose to ignore you. So outside, call her and if she comes throw a party, lavish her with treats. If not, grab that long line and reel her in while encouraging her and repeating "come." When she comes consistently with the long line attached, do the same thing with it not attached. Then start training in new areas. Keep progressing.

I'd personally hold off on introducing the e-collar until you've progressed to her listening better. Think of it as yet another more advanced variable.
 
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