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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone has experience with the chemical castration route. Because neutering is obviously so debated in terms of behaviour I’d like to try something that isn’t permanent. I don’t like the idea of pumping him full of chemicals but I’m so back and forth with it all and obviously surgery is permanent and there are no guarantees with how the lack of testosterone is going to affect him. He’s slightly young yet so have time to think about it all but he is exhibiting constant hypersexual behaviours and no amount of training and working with him is helping. He’s got about 6 months of growing and maturing yet I’d imagine so trying to find out what I can before making any decisions. Any input is appreciated
 

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There are so many different views on neutering, that I think you will have to use your best judgement on what’s the best for you and your dog. I got my boy neutered at about a 14 months, in terms of behavior I have not noticed a single change in his behavior other than he doesn’t (mark as much when he goes to pee, doesn’t hump ). physically he is doing great!!

Some people swear about waiting until 2 years, while others get theirs neutered at 8 months. Im in a Vizsla meet up group with 10 other vizslas, and I don’t know anyone that has done chemical castration, so I’m hesitant to say yes or no to that method.
 

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I could only find the post on the forum, and things might have changed over the years. There is a couple of links in the post.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I could only find the post on the forum, and things might have changed over the years. There is a couple of links in the post.
Yeah I did have a read of that thread. Quite a few years ago. Wondering if anybody had any experiences themselves or more recently. Thanks though!
 

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Just wondering if anyone has experience with the chemical castration route. Because neutering is obviously so debated in terms of behaviour I’d like to try something that isn’t permanent. I don’t like the idea of pumping him full of chemicals but I’m so back and forth with it all and obviously surgery is permanent and there are no guarantees with how the lack of testosterone is going to affect him. He’s slightly young yet so have time to think about it all but he is exhibiting constant hypersexual behaviours and no amount of training and working with him is helping. He’s got about 6 months of growing and maturing yet I’d imagine so trying to find out what I can before making any decisions. Any input is appreciated
We chemically castrated our male at 12.5 months because from about 10 months he became aggressive towards other males, he would regularly provoke fights and he got bitten several times. It was difficult to intervene quickly enough to prevent a fight because the situation could change very suddenly. Apart from male vs male aggression we didn't have any other problems, no humping, but he would occasionally mark indoors in unfamiliar settings if he could smell other male dogs. I agonised about it for a while because obviously don't want to him to suffer health problems later in life from lack of testosterone. But I also didn't want the aggression and fear around other males to become entrenched, or for him to be injured or to injure other dogs. He is now 16 months so it has been about 4 months months since he got the implant. For the most part it has worked quite well, we can trust him to play well with other males now. There still seems to be some residual fear that can cause him to react aggressively, such as when he feels encircled by two or more dogs, or when we pass a small dog on a leash who fires up viciously at him. But now it is predictable and manageable, we watch his body language and unless if there's more than one other dog that were not familiar with, we move on and he is usually quite happy to exit the situation too. Not much I can do about snarly, vicious small dogs on leashes but I hope with maturity and experience, he will learn to find them non-threatening. He has gained about 1.5kg from his pre-castration weight of 23kg, and has become noticeably more interested in food. This has actually made treat training easier, and he's made a lot of progress over the last 1-2 months with walking in a heel, not jumping on passers by and being more trustworthy/less destructive at home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We chemically castrated our male at 12.5 months because from about 10 months he became aggressive towards other males, he would regularly provoke fights and he got bitten several times. It was difficult to intervene quickly enough to prevent a fight because the situation could change very suddenly. Apart from male vs male aggression we didn't have any other problems, no humping, but he would occasionally mark indoors in unfamiliar settings if he could smell other male dogs. I agonised about it for a while because obviously don't want to him to suffer health problems later in life from lack of testosterone. But I also didn't want the aggression and fear around other males to become entrenched, or for him to be injured or to injure other dogs. He is now 16 months so it has been about 4 months months since he got the implant. For the most part it has worked quite well, we can trust him to play well with other males now. There still seems to be some residual fear that can cause him to react aggressively, such as when he feels encircled by two or more dogs, or when we pass a small dog on a leash who fires up viciously at him. But now it is predictable and manageable, we watch his body language and unless if there's more than one other dog that were not familiar with, we move on and he is usually quite happy to exit the situation too. Not much I can do about snarly, vicious small dogs on leashes but I hope with maturity and experience, he will learn to find them non-threatening. He has gained about 1.5kg from his pre-castration weight of 23kg, and has become noticeably more interested in food. This has actually made treat training easier, and he's made a lot of progress over the last 1-2 months with walking in a heel, not jumping on passers by and being more trustworthy/less destructive at home.
Sorry for my delay on responding I hadn’t seen this until now! Thanks so much for sharing your experience!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Just to update this thread for anybody else curious or debating this, I’ve made the decision to try the suprelorin chemical castration implant. My boy is 21months so just under two so very unlikely his growth plates are still open.

Apparently, it can take up to 6 weeks to take effect, and the one we are trying lasts 6 months. The needle and implant were about the size of a microchip and put in the scruff of the neck. He barely noticed but then again he did have a kong full of cheese… ah bribery. Will update here if/how things progress.
 
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