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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Tomorrow is the big day! We are adopting a 1 year old Vizsla named Lexy (picture below). After receiving great advice from this forum, we decided to adopt Lexy from the breeder instead of getting a puppy.

I am excited and nervous. I am so in love with our 2 year old Vizsla, Chloe, and I don't want her to feel neglected as we bond with the new Vizsla. I am also worried that Lexy might not bond with our family and have anxiety. I know I'm probably over-thinking everything, but this is going to be a huge change for our family and I want it to go well. Chloe and Lexy will meet for the first time tomorrow and hopefully they like each other (fingers crossed).
 

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... I know I'm probably over-thinking everything, ...
I'm sure that you are. Over-thinking, that is. Lexy will immediately adapt and being so young, I'm sure that she will defer to Chloe and Chloe will accept her. Chloe _may_ take a day or two.

Lexy's still young, so there will be puppy-ish stuff to deal with. But when it happens, just remember that she's past the shark-attack stage.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Unfortunately, it didn't work out. Lexy was not a good fit, so we decided to adopt a puppy from a litter they are expecting in May.
 

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There are times you know it's not going to work. Other times they just need some time to adjust.
I guess it's count down to a new puppy.
 

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Unfortunately, it didn't work out. Lexy was not a good fit, so we decided to adopt a puppy from a litter they are expecting in May.
Can I ask what signs there were that it wouldn't work out? This is something we have considered in the future as well (distant future) and would be interested in what to look for when we get to that point.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We were surprised to discover that Lexy is an outdoor farm dog. They allow her to roam free during the day. She sleeps in an outdoor kennel with three other Vizslas. We did not think that she would be happy being a "city dog" and indoors most of the time. She also has a small defect that concerned us. The last rib on her right side sticks out strangely. Even though their veterinarian said it was not a concern, we thought it was odd. We also noticed that she had an unusual gait when she ran. Lexy was also in heat and that was a concern. On a positive note, her personality and demeanor was normal.
 

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... Lexy is an outdoor farm dog. They allow her to roam free during the day. She sleeps in an outdoor kennel with three other Vizslas. ...
Ummm ... that leads me to wonder how they treat their litters. For socialization, mom and the pups should be inside and in more-or-less constant contact with their people. IMO, that is - I'd be interested to hear other opinions.
 

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She probably had a floating rib. It's not a health concern, and not genetic.
I've fostered some dogs that have never been inside a home before. They adjust very quickly, and love being inside dogs.

My only concern from what you described would be the dogs gait. It can go from kneecaps that ride a little high, and cause the dogs gait not to be as free flowing. Medically it's not a problem.
But it could also be a sign of hip, or knee problems. And those can get very expensive with surgeries, and rehab.
 
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