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So I just came home and I was talking with my lovely girlfriend who had to play with Dax for a couple hours without me and she told me that Dax has been biting very hard today.

We're making a lot of assumptions but we're not really too sure. Ofcourse he is only 7 weeks old so we're not worrying too much at all right now but any ideas what's going on?

If it is just biting issues what are some methods you suggest that we can help Dax realise that biting is not good. So far we're using the firm 'No' voice when he attempts to bite us and Marissa just started incorporating saying 'Ow' in a high pitch tone everytime he bites (some thing she picked up reading or viewing Cesar Milan). She also put together this can filled with coins in it to shake it... a suggestion we got from a friend but he's not responsive at all.

What do we doooooooooo
 

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A spray bottle with water will snap him out of it. Then ignore him until he is sitting. If it continues leave the room, count to 30 then return. All of this is easier said then done. Our V is 13 weeks tomorrow so is still right in the middle of the play bite mode. From what others have posted it sounds like they do this until about 16-18 weeks. So long haul but stay consistent.
 

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It's just a puppy phase, thankfully! I think we see a new post about biting and nipping puppies at least once a week--good thing we always have lots of advice around here! :)

This is normal puppy behavior. This is how they would play with their litter mates and other dogs. What I found to work was to yelp "Ow!" when I felt teeth, then quickly turn my back on him for 15-30 seconds. In other words, what I was saying to Jasper was, "Ow! That hurt me! I don't like to play with puppies that hurt me!" Social isolation is a pretty big deal for puppies. Dax will be sad that you don't want to play, and will soon learn that nipping means that play stops.

If Dax is like Jasper, eventually the turning around becomes a new game and he would run around me or start nipping my feet. In that case when he nipped I would yelp "Ow!" and then stand and leave the room so that he could not get me. I would not look at him or anything, just leave him alone in the room for again, about 30 seconds. Then I would calmly go back and continue play.

Jasper eventually caught onto the word "Ow!" and now, if it looks like he might nip at me (usually if we're playing way too rough--my own fault) I can say "Ow!" and he backs right off. I also used this technique even if the nips didn't hurt, as well as if he was just biting my pant leg or something. Basically teaching Jasper that biting humans is bad, as they're very wimpy in that regard.

Be very careful waving your hands around Dax's face--that will usually prompt a nip at his new favorite toy. Other people here have had success with other methods of stopping biting--you'll just have to find what works best for you! Do not be afraid to try a "time out" if it gets totally out of hand and he's not responding. Calmly place Dax in his crate and leave for a few minutes--this is a consequence, not a punishment, and is a time out not only for him but for you. Usually Jasper only got that bad when he was overtired--after two minutes, I'd walk back in and he'd be totally passed out.

As for the can thing--he might just not be noise sensitive (a good thing when fireworks are in play!). I was told that if you use those methods to make sure to shake the can out of his sight, such as behind your back--that way he doesn't associate that bad noise with you. But if it's not working, then no worries!

But like I said--he'll grow out of it eventually. Jasper stopped nipping somewhere between 14 and 16 weeks, I think? And when they do get their adult teeth they're not nearly as needle sharp as the puppy ones--but you definitely want to keep up on teaching bite inhibition now, as those big adult teeth could do a lot of damage!
 

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I'm really sorry that the breeder let Dax go at seven weeks. Eight to ten weeks with Mom and siblings is so much better, and many more breeders are beginning to understand this (but not all).

Puppies learn important lessons during weeks 7 - 10, one of them being bite inhibition. His siblings would have taught him this, but he had to leave them too soon. Now it will be up to you.

I have seen this time and time again... as well as seeing those puppies who were given the extra time with Mom and siblings, who turn into calmer and gentler adolescent dogs.

Dax is VERY young and you need to have the utmost patience with him. He will grow out of it. :) He is only playing.

p.s. Teething is another thing altogether. Be aware that "they chew 'til they're two," and anything you don't want him to chew on should be put out of his reach for the next two years. This is also normal puppy behavior. Good luck!
 

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I agree with mswhipple.
Confusing to see such a prominent breeder can be so careless. I read some will go as far as 12 or 14 weeks before pick up. But those dogs end up more doggie instead of human oriented.
In the end you will have a dog that's glued to you and you guys will be the center of his world.

Those puppy teeth are so sharp. I would try and not excite him too much, they feed off your energy.
redrover has so practical advice, we used something similar.

Ps My arms bear the scars of 3 puppy-hoods: 2 dogs and 1 cat. The cat was more painful.
 

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datacan said:
I agree with mswhipple.
Confusing to see such a prominent breeder can be so careless.
lol
Onpoint breeds excellent dogs and are well know to do so by many other pros. I don't think that is a fair statement.

I don't have all the answers as I've never bred pups, or raised enough to know the difference, but some think it's best for puppies to go home at 49 days.

A lot of people won't leave the house with their dog until after its second set of shots, missing 2-3 weeks of socialization during the critical 4 week window. imo that is much worse than bringing one home at 7 weeks.

We got ours at the standard 8 weeks, so I'm not sticking up for myself here, it's just that I've read pros/cons for dogs coming home at different ages, and I think it's silly for anyone to pretend they have the definitive answer on the subject.

Going back to the biting, I think Mischa learned more from other dogs than we could teach her with our "ouch".
She'd bite too hard, and get bitten too hard, while playing with other dogs and learned that chomping down isn't cool.
I will certainly agree that this would be learned with the litter-mates, but it can also be achieved while socializing with other dogs of all ages and breeds.
 

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keep bandaids around until you all get it figured out......Its what puppies do.they need to excersize those jaw muscles.
 

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Regarding bite inhibition... I WISH I knew more about Willie's early life, but alas, that is impossible because he can't talk.

Willie's bite inhibition is so good that if he accidentally touches me with a tooth, he puts himself into an immediate "time out" and hangs his head in shame. He won't resume the game for some time. The other day during a play session he touched my face with a tooth (it was the lightest little touch) and I thought he would never forgive himself!
 

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There is so much current research on infant dogs and cats.
Why assume the breeder's job?
8 weeks with litter mates makes a big difference.

We got our puppy at 8 weeks too. He was not biting hard and knew how to behave with other dogs.
As for socialization, pravo is devastating unvaccinated dogs and it's just not worth the risk.
Ian Dunbar suggests, every stanger to wash hands before touching the unvaccinated puppy. Also the puppy should be carried to safe places until fully vaccinated.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you again for the shared input. Since putting up this post, we've played around with Dax and see what works with helping him tame his biting issues. We do understand that 7 weeks seems a little early to let there pup go, however Dax' mother who had a litter of 11 got very ill after she gave birth to the litter. From what exactly? I can't recall it ends with -itis for what my brain can conjure up. So Dax and his siblings we're pretty much weaned off there mother right from the get go...

So Dax is 8 week, 3 days old. His biting has certainly become less aggressive from last week which is very surprising about how fast they grow and adapt. He still tends to nibble but compared to last week where he bit George (Marissa' father) on the earlobe that caused a big blood fest, it's not bad.

We decided to do the time out as RedRover suggested because the 'Ow' methods and the 'Pennies in a Can' were not working... he seems pretty A.D.D right now anyhow.
 

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This post is what I needed. Summit is almost 9 weeks. I was sitting on the floor playing with him and he run and jummped at my face and bit my cheek leaving a small cut.

I printed out am Dunnbar's book "After You Gey Your Puppy" and have been trying to work on bite inhibitian but today and yesterday he has been realy into biting my wife and I.
 

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;D Wait till you get home one day and he hasn't had enough exercise. ;D That coupled with he has to go potty right now! ;D He knows he shouldn't go in the house so....he starts jumping all over you and ripping everything he can get his teeth into. ;D He is saying.....help me, help me, take me out NOW. Hurry up NOW! ;D ;D

PS. don't get mad at him, just take him out, and let him tear up and down the neighborhood. ;D
 
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