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Peanut is almost 5 months old and we go through beds at a rate of one a week :)

When I say 'we go through beds', I mean he does. They gradually get shredded to pieces. I'm ok that, but my worry is the stuffing material. It's mostly plastic wool-like stuffing and I worry he swallows the bits one day and we'll have a major snafu.

Any recommendations or ideas for beds that survive the teething phase (and beyond)?
 

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When this happened with Ellie we switch from beds to doggy blankets as the comfort bedding material when we could not supervise her. We found Ellie was less inclined to chew/shred a blanket versus a bed and it was better than nothing. At night time we'd switch back to the bed in her crate as she'd just fall asleep and not be inclined to chew it up versus during the day if she's in for her nap time. If they start eating that bed stuffing can cause a very bad and expensive medical emergency, just not worth the risk if they are in the bed shredding phase.
 

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Some dogs just can't resist shredding their beds. My last two girls, and the two boys before them, were "shredders". It was both annoying, and expensive. They never really stopped either, but they did slow down as they got older.
I started making my own beds, they're really easy, and I would stuff them with old clothes, blankets, sheets, basically anything that wasn't a petrochemical based "woolen" product. I did use some of the "foam pads" from the fabric store also. I made chew toys out of old pant legs, as most of the work is already done and all you have to do is sew up the ends. I have an light industrial level sewing machine now, so I can run canvas, as well as thicker, denser materials.
I lucked out with Finn. He destroyed many toys when he was puppy, but he's left his beds mostly alone. He still has the same beds he had the first night he came into the house. One he drags from place to place like Linus from the Charlie Brown comic strips.
Make you're own beds. It's not as expensive as it may seem.
 

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My adult dogs have more expensive beds. The young ones do not, until I see if they are bed chewers, or worse bed eaters. I’ve only had one that loved to chew holes in a bed until probably 2 years old. Her beds were cheap, and repaired weekly.

I have just been lucky, as I’ve seen pictures of plenty of beds that looked like they have exploded.
 

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I have just been lucky, as I’ve seen pictures of plenty of beds that looked like they have exploded.
I remember coming home one night to a disaster. Both of the girls just destroyed their new beds.
The internal bolster material used to create the sides was a fabric tube stuffed with shredded carboard, sawdust, and cedar shavings. What a mess. It was everywhere, as well as that "green wool" stuff used in dog beds. I hope they had a good time, because they slept on the floor that night until I could get to Tractor Supply in the AM.
I think we were still vacuuming up bits of those beds well into spring.
 

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@gunnr
Well I let the known chewer sleep with me one night, on a goose down comforter. I woke up during the night, because something kept tickling my nose. When I turned on the light, it looked like a snow storm had hit the bedroom. Between her pulling them out, and the ceiling fan moving them. Even the dresser tops were covered in tiny feathers. You get over the shock, and you just have to laugh about it.
 

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They're our babies, of course, and we want them to have niceties and be happy about it, but they are really not as sensitive about their bedding as we are. Mine like softies, sure, but they will also choose the floor over a softie, and be happy about it.

So, if the choice was a bed whose "plastic wool-like stuffing" might be ingested, or a piece of rug, I would use the rug. It's not cruel and they're not going to hate you for it :). Or just a blanket, as Dan_A suggested. It's too easy to see how that bed stuffing could become an intestine stuffing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks all, he's been sleeping on his blanket for the past 3 days and seemed fine. There's another bed made out of some non-fluffy fabric (I cannot remember the material, but definitely man-made) and somehow he doesn't want to shred it. The fluffy ones go in under one day. I assume the fluffy ones may remind him of the animals he'd normally chase. Who knows.

Anyway, will start collecting old clothes to make some beds and toys at home. In the meantime, I'm busy trying to convince him the sofa is not for sharing. I can't afford to lose this battle ;)
 

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while mine would not chew up their beds, Miksa just decided they are to be flipped around or pushed into a corner if possible and would end up sleeping on the bare crate tray as a puppy. I ended up figuring that he is ok with blanket as he could move those around as he pleases. so when we traveled somewhere he looked like the step child next to Bende... Bende stretching out on his nice tick plushy crate pad as he prefers, and Miksa having some blankets all over him... well at least he was happy:)
at around 1 year old I was able to put into his crate some thin crate pads without him trying to make a pile of it and switch the blanket to pillow. that has made the difference and at around 2 he upgraded to normal crate pad (plushy and tick) and we kept the pillow.
the good thing is both of them can lay down on the floor too and fall asleep, as long as they are not cold.
 

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Some dogs just can't resist shredding their beds. My last two girls, and the two boys before them, were "shredders". It was both annoying, and expensive. They never really stopped either, but they did slow down as they got older.
I started making my own beds, they're really easy, and I would stuff them with old clothes, blankets, sheets, basically anything that wasn't a petrochemical based "woolen" product. I did use some of the "foam pads" from the fabric store also. I made chew toys out of old pant legs, as most of the work is already done and all you have to do is sew up the ends. I have an light industrial level sewing machine now, so I can run canvas, as well as thicker, denser materials.
I lucked out with Finn. He destroyed many toys when he was puppy, but he's left his beds mostly alone. He still has the same beds he had the first night he came into the house. One he drags from place to place like Linus from the Charlie Brown comic strips.
Make you're own beds. It's not as expensive as it may seem.
Thanks for the great tips. I’m definitely going to make Zora some toys from old jeans. She’s 8 months and chews...chews...chews!
 

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Old jeans work great. Stuff them with old socks, t- shirts, or bed sheets. Typically I put everything through the washer on hot, with no soap first.
Fortunately, or unfortunately, I have a light industrial, walking foot, leather machine, I purchased to repair horse blankets. I can get a 1/2” of material under the presser foot and still run it easily.
Horses typically yank out the bindings, tail flaps, and straps on their, and each other’s blankets and those blankets can run upward of $400.00 in season. A blanket repair will start at $40.00 in CT, so it was easy to justify the machine. Making dog toys and beds was an unintended side benefit for me.
 

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Old jeans work great. Stuff them with old socks, t- shirts, or bed sheets. Typically I put everything through the washer on hot, with no soap first.
Fortunately, or unfortunately, I have a light industrial, walking foot, leather machine, I purchased to repair horse blankets. I can get a 1/2” of material under the presser foot and still run it easily.
Horses typically yank out the bindings, tail flaps, and straps on their, and each other’s blankets and those blankets can run upward of $400.00 in season. A blanket repair will start at $40.00 in CT, so it was easy to justify the machine. Making dog toys and beds was an unintended side benefit for me.
Thanks for this awesome tip. I’ve got some old jeans that I’ll try. Our Zora is 8 months and will rip anything in her crate during the day. With winter coming on, need something warm for her to cuddle with.
 
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