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Thought I replied to this earlier, but maybe not... Anyway, this is a GREAT article, and everybody should read it... all the way through!
 

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mswhipple,

I did post this in another area but I am just learning the structure of vizslaforum. Found that "puppies" is the best section.

I get anxious for buyers who purchase a high-energy dog like a Vizsla for the "eye candy" reason. Tough interviews should be done by breeders so our pur- bred, healthy breed finds the right owners. They are not for everyone.

Example: Selling a $200,000 exotic race car to a 16-year-old who has no experience driving because it looks good.

Selling a ocean-going sailboat to someone who never has been on the water.

Now add that someone is selling a living being.

Here is another post that I hope get potential puppy buyers attention. The best rescue Vizsla is the one never created.

http://redbirddog.blogspot.com/2010/07/purchasing-vizsla-so-it-doesnt-end-up.html

Sorry for the soapbox.

Vizslas are a lifestyle more than a dog.

Rod
http://redbirddog.blogspot.com
 

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Thanks for another great post, Rod! I've been volunteering with the Michigan Humane Society for seven years, and I am still amazed at how people can take a beautiful purebred dog (or any dog) who has been a family member for 8 or 9 years and just drop it off at the shelter because they "don't have time for it any more" (or some other lame excuse). People can be very cavalier about dog ownership. It just breaks my heart. Can you imagine how the dog must feel?

Yes, and it always makes me nervous when I read about people who have chosen a Vizsla puppy as their first dog. This is a special breed and I think the best fit will be with experienced dog owners, OR (maybe) with very dedicated first-time owners.
 

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I agree with both of you. Thanks for the insight.

Pet shelters can be heartbreaking places. Dogs always seem to know when their time is up.

On a lighter note, the V isn't such high maintenance. It really doesn't need to be a triathlon athlete. Conditioning them will require more workout but it's really not necessary.
Vs excel at hunting but they need to be trained specifically. They were not born with a gun beside them.
Calorie intake is more of a concern and it's hard not to make an obese dog even if it is exercised regularly.

I was talking to the breeder and she introduced us to 76 year old grand mother who owned a V.(of course she had them all her life). I was amazed - she used a treadmill to work out her V.
 

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I do think Vs are higher maintenance than many other breeds. We have had many dogs over the years, some purebred & others from the shelter, and I do think the V requires dedication to exercise & stimulation to keep them happy & healthy. It is necessary to condition them; in addition, I think it's hard to make any dog obese if they are being cared for properly. Unless they have a specific medical condition, no dog should be obese. If a dog is being exercised properly, but is still over weight, then they are being overfed/fed table scraps & not burning enough of the calories. All dogs need to be trained, but a V from good lines does not need to be taught how to hunt. Even the companion V should be allowed to exercise his/her instincts if just in the form of play, games, &/or adventure. It is what is right & responsible as a V owner, IMHO. Thanks for the links :)
 
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