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When we got Fred and reading this forum, I was fully prepared for my little whirlwind. She is now 5.5 months old and has been an easy going girl from the start.

I've noticed that her stamina is increasing with age, she can go on longer hikes or walks. Even at the end of a longer hike she'll still run in front of us looking for sticks to play with. But her energy always feels controlled - I mean she doses her own energy, not that I control hers. Indoor she's never had a bad shark attack and never had the zoomies (I'm not kidding). When she is crated (large parts during the day) she sleeps. It's like an 'off-switch'. Awake, she's a normal pup (-always asking for play, or attention) but I never have to put her in time-out. The only time she can barely hold her excitement is during training. If I don't give her a command for a few seconds she'll do all the tricks in the book, while vigorously trying to get the treat out of my hand.

The other day I met a 1 y/o 'V' off-leash and it was a such big goofball going completely nuts.. WOW what TORNADO!! And it has got me wondering about energy levels after the first 6 months - most posts on this forum say everything will get easier after the first 6 months. Frankly, all I'm hoping for is that Fred will remain a bit of a lazy one ;-)

At what age did your puppy's energy peak? And is there any difference in energy? Is it stamina? Or crazy energy? Did your V's energy level change during adolescence? Or is is only an attitude phase?
 

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It doesn't really "peak". It just keeps building for most of their life.
Puppies, up to a year or so old, have a lot of "un-directed energy", meaning that they are just into everything,everywhere, at one time it seems. This type of behavior is just part of growing up, and in time they teach themselves to more or less moderate their energy output, as they mature. This is probably what folks are referring to when they say it gets easier past 6 months.
As for pure stamina, I think their peak for their stamina comes at 3-7 years. During this period you have a fully mature, adult vizsla, with all of the strength and power they will ever have. Nice young elastic joints and tendons, and age hasn't begun to catch up yet.They slow down at about 8-10 years old, but you would really have to look for it
to even notice it. Years 10-12, they can still impress you, but they need longer to recover.
Finn is just at a year old, and still has that "tornado" energy at times, but in the field he becomes very focused, and his energy is directed toward a purpose that he is starting to understand. He still does zoomies in the yard, and will for many years, but the shark phase has been over for many months now, thankfully. He was awful!!
Some Vizslas are, like you describe Fred, nice and easy, and maybe a little bit lazy. Though I think you would find out just how lazy she is not, given the right circumstances. ;) Some are a high wired tight rope act like my previous girl, Gunnr was. Most are in between. Gunnr was nerve wracking in the field. It still amazes me that I never lost her.
 

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Un-directed energy is a very good way to explain exactly what it is I guess. It is very hard, even for an easygoing pup, to focus on one thing when there is so much in the world that grabs attention. Good to realize again this will change gradually in the coming months and years.

As for stamina, I can't wait to bring her on hikes that take multiple (full) days. At the moment, she is able to come with us for half a day (about 15 km / 9,3 miles) and then needs to rest at least 24h.

How was Gunnr indoors, compared to Finn?
 

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I'm 7 years in and don't think I've seen the peak yet. :) At this point her development has blended together and I don't fully remember her puppy personality or energy levels as a distinct thing from what she is now. You're in a better position to observe and note those changes. The one moment I do remember with great clarity is when I introduced to her to quail at 9 months old and I finally saw this hyper-focused predator come out that was just so different from the goofy puppy I'd been living with. That was incredible and made me appreciate her and all the generations of breeding that had gone into creating this amazing animal in a new way. Overall she's pretty chill for a Vizsla, but still has manic bursts of high energy which are part of her natural rhythm in a day.
 

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Gunnr was "different".
In the house Gunnr was fine, but she had Tika's calming demeanor to keep her grounded. They used to tear up their beds on a regular basis, but never damaged any furniture. Finn was a terror as a puppy. Non stop, you had to watch him like a hawk, and he was relentless in terrorizing the cats! Finn would get himself over tired and you had a wrestling match to get him into the kennel, where he really needed to be. He was a fight. All day, every day. But, by contrast, Finn was housebroken within days, and didn't have the usual puppy bladder, and need to poop constantly. He was an iron gut little pup, but OMG was he an ill behaved little guy!!
In the field though, and even in the back yard, Gunnr was a non stop machine. She had one mode, All out. Her philosophy was that it was your job to keep up with her, and if you couldn't handle the pace, drop out of the race.
She really didn't give a **** about me in the field. I had to constantly watch her for the signs that she was about to take off and hunt for herself. It was probably 5 years before I could relax with her in the field, but she still had range. Gunnr never checked back for me.
She was also a big strong girl. Every bit as big and strong as the boys. She was solid 24" at shoulder and 62-65 lbs. She was special.
Finn by contrast is a blessing in the field, and has been since we started working together this past spring. Everything in the field just seems to fall into place really fast with him. Tonight we were doing 60-70 yard retrieves in grass that is 1-2 meters tall. He was marking his retrieves, without any way of seeing that dummy hit the ground. This is really not something to expect a young dog to be able to do. It usually takes a good bit of work, and he's been doing it for 2 months now.
I'd love to take credit for his field work as his trainer, but he just has a wicked strong genetic imprint. It ain't me, it's all him.
With each puppy/dog, there are good and not so good behaviors. You just keep working with them
 

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Fred sounds like a remarkable pup. Who was her breeder?
She was what some would could see as the runt of the litter. Born last, but healthy (with some minor issues such as a UTI) She slept most of all the pups. Even through loud noises she could sleep better than the rest of the litter. The breeder picked her out for us. We live in the city in an apartment so an easy going V is perfect for us.

The breeder is a non-professional breeder, they do it for the love of V’s as a house dog but not to breed show- or fielddogs. They only have 1 litter every 2 years. Her parents are official pedigree but are held as house dogs. They do some fieldwork but just for fun.
 

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Ruby is 9 y/o now, I still don't think she has peaked yet..she's like a duracell bunny..
 

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When we got Fred and reading this forum, I was fully prepared for my little whirlwind. She is now 5.5 months old and has been an easy going girl from the start.

I've noticed that her stamina is increasing with age, she can go on longer hikes or walks. Even at the end of a longer hike she'll still run in front of us looking for sticks to play with. But her energy always feels controlled - I mean she doses her own energy, not that I control hers. Indoor she's never had a bad shark attack and never had the zoomies (I'm not kidding). When she is crated (large parts during the day) she sleeps. It's like an 'off-switch'. Awake, she's a normal pup (-always asking for play, or attention) but I never have to put her in time-out. The only time she can barely hold her excitement is during training. If I don't give her a command for a few seconds she'll do all the tricks in the book, while vigorously trying to get the treat out of my hand.

The other day I met a 1 y/o 'V' off-leash and it was a such big goofball going completely nuts.. WOW what TORNADO!! And it has got me wondering about energy levels after the first 6 months - most posts on this forum say everything will get easier after the first 6 months. Frankly, all I'm hoping for is that Fred will remain a bit of a lazy one ;-)

At what age did your puppy's energy peak? And is there any difference in energy? Is it stamina? Or crazy energy? Did your V's energy level change during adolescence? Or is is only an attitude phase?
It never really peaked. My deceased V was as energetic as ever up until 4-6 months before his death at age 11 and he was probably suffering from some
sort of cancer during that time. I don’t notice any real decrease in energy in our 10 year old V. When she slows down I guess it will be time to worry.
 

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I wouldn't really call it energy peaks.
Puppies have longer endurance as they get older. They go from 30 minutes tiring them out, to 45, then a hour. It just keeps building with age.
In adult dogs, part of this depends on how much they are conditioned.
A couch potato six or seven year old dog, is not going to have the endurance of a well exercised dog.

These dogs can start having less endurance, anywhere from 9- 12 years old. The dog that may have ran 20 miles off lead, might do only 10.
Others might only do 5. A lot depends on how well their bodies hold up, and if they have been kept in shape.
 

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When we got Fred and reading this forum, I was fully prepared for my little whirlwind. She is now 5.5 months old and has been an easy going girl from the start.

I've noticed that her stamina is increasing with age, she can go on longer hikes or walks. Even at the end of a longer hike she'll still run in front of us looking for sticks to play with. But her energy always feels controlled - I mean she doses her own energy, not that I control hers. Indoor she's never had a bad shark attack and never had the zoomies (I'm not kidding). When she is crated (large parts during the day) she sleeps. It's like an 'off-switch'. Awake, she's a normal pup (-always asking for play, or attention) but I never have to put her in time-out. The only time she can barely hold her excitement is during training. If I don't give her a command for a few seconds she'll do all the tricks in the book, while vigorously trying to get the treat out of my hand.

The other day I met a 1 y/o 'V' off-leash and it was a such big goofball going completely nuts.. WOW what TORNADO!! And it has got me wondering about energy levels after the first 6 months - most posts on this forum say everything will get easier after the first 6 months. Frankly, all I'm hoping for is that Fred will remain a bit of a lazy one ;-)

At what age did your puppy's energy peak? And is there any difference in energy? Is it stamina? Or crazy energy? Did your V's energy level change during adolescence? Or is is only an attitude phase?
My V, Cashew, started to dial it down at about 3 1/2 yrs. old. He will be 5 on Dec.28th this year. He is super cool & fun now, loves his long walks & loves his off-lead hiking every weekend. He is totally to lounge around most of the day too. As a pup he was always a calmer V, then most. His best friend who is a female V, same age, is still a wild-woman.
 

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I wouldn’t say his energy changed at all. When he was young he was a mess in the house but got tired much more easily. These days at 13 months he’s controlled in the house, but out in the field we haven’t found his limit. The stamina is incredible. He’s eating like a demon too. Always hungry. He doesn’t like dry kibbles and used to refuse to eat them but now he reliably eats them and asks for more. Something about his metabolism. I think.
 
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