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I saw this program on an older thread here on the forum and was wondering if anyone has actually followed it and if so their reaction? It seems very simple and intuitive and the intent is to desensitize your dog from distractions and being overly hyper while just trying to help them relax. I may give this a try, but that leads me to my next question...how old should your puppy be before you start really training him/her? Mine is 4 months old now, and we have been doing basic training (sit, leave it, out, off, down, bed and a lot of work on recall). But wondering about when to start with the heels, counter surfing, jumping on people etc. with corrections. While we reinforce good behavior and redirect when undesired behavior occurs, wondering when we should start correcting this behavior.

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I won't try to define the term "really training". I'm not sure exactly what you mean by it.
My "program", if you will, revolves around continuous conditioning. It's just my expectations as times goes on that become higher. I expect very little from an 8-10 week old puppy, but you can introduce them to a lot of different building blocks that will be incorporated later.
Counter surfing and jumping up conditioning begins on day one. It's hard with a puppy to not jump up, but it can be done very gently, and in the form of a game. If counter surfing never starts, it's a lot easier to stop. ;)
At 8 weeks old I have the puppy on a leash and we're "walking" at heel. I might only get one or two steps, and then we're done. I'm not a big "walk at heel" person, but I do want an easy leash. I want the dog to not pull at the leash like a Mack Truck. I don't really care where it is at on that 9 feet of leash, as long as it is not pulling.
As for the "correction". If by that you mean getting physical with the puppy,try to find a mechanism to put the puppy in a position where it corrects itself. Not always possible, but you try. It goes to jump up, it hits a hand,not the hand hitting it. same with counters. Make the action uncomfortable or the consequence something the dog doesn't really like to do. Don't so much "physically" correct, but just be unrelenting in letting poor behaviors continue.
There will come a time when your puppy gets a swat to the rump. It's going to happen, but don't play that card to early.
The heel is complete control over a dog. You are controlling virtually every aspect of that dog. From the pads of his feet, to the cells in his brain. It is very much the same as walking a horse on the lead line. That dog should be front of shoulder at your knee, a loose leash forming a "U" under his collar, and he should be about 1-2 dog widths away from you. He cues off your knee in his peripheral vision. If you are right handed, he heels to your left side, and the opposite if you are left handed. It takes quite a bit of time and work to arrive at this point.From here the dog heels with no leash attached, but the physical frame remains the same. The heel, done properly, puts a tremendous amount of pressure on a dog, and each dog will be different. Some never "get it". Some get it right away. You have 12-14 years to work on it. :)
Hunting Vizslas have to hit the ground running. A lot goes into their first year. Everything you would want a non hunting Vizsla to do, they have to do, off the leash, with birds flying, and guns going off. But, and this is a very big but, they can handle it as long as the pressure is controlled and never applied to much in one singular aspect. We want the puppy to see as much as it can see, and then between years one and two, we build on it, and again between years two and three. There are some things that will continually be revisited throughout their adult life.
 

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Honestly I think 4 months is very young to ask more than just the basics. Focus on loose leash walking (it’ll do wonders for you when they are fully grown) and on crate training plus basic obedience. They are still so young and unable to focus or control their excitement, let them be young and explore the world with them. Be their safe haven. Once they turn 1 you’ll see that they are much more capable of following your instructions.

About the relax part: in the house I used the crate for relaxation at that age. And outside we trained to relax on a mat, but it wasn’t until my pup turned 1 that I could to take her somewhere, roll down her mat and have her relax while we have a drink.

I guess what I’m trying to say is: enjoy puppytime now, bond with eachother. It’ll make training easier later when your pup is fully ready for heavy training.
 
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