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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We picked up our adorable pup Monday and he turned 8 weeks 3 days after we got him. He has been awesome- we have 4 young kids 6 and under and he loves them and they love him. So far his training is going great- he can come, sit, down, place, and fetch already. I do 3, 10 minute training sessions a day and he loves it. He is very smart! It has been such a great week. However he continues to pee in the house. Unless hes sleeping we take him out every 15-20 minutes. we stay outside usually for 5-10 minutes and if he pees we give him a treat and praise him. However a lot of times he will come back in, play for 3 minutes and then pees inside. I catch him in act, grab him, say a firm no, run outside, and he will finish and I praise and give a treat. I have no idea what I am doing wrong. He is crate trained and doing great with it- and can go 7 hours at night without peeing, and will nap in it during the day for 2-3 hours at a time. But I feel like if we are inside (he is only allowed in main area of house so I can always see him), he is peeing so often. he only every squats to pee for 1-2 seconds so im wondering if he is not emptying bladder? and how in the world do we train that?? Thanks in advance!
 

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Great that he has settled I o your family so well!

with regards to the peeing - he’s 8 weeks old! He will have lots of accidents! It sounds like you are doing all the right things - just be patient!

our vizsla cross had accidents day up until about 11 weeks, and during night until around 14 weeks during night

he’s now 17 weeks and I would say he’s been accident free for about 3 weeks.We didn’t do anything different to what you described, one day it clicked!

keep your cool, keeping giving him lots of praise when he does it outside, give him lots of opportunities to go outside and it will all fall h to place 😊
 

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A little bit of Zen philosophy. Eight week old puppies don't "continue" to pee in the house. They just pee in the house. He's not anywhere near old enough to assign the "continue" part.
Everything that you just described is exactly what I would have expected. Eight week old puppies don't pee on a schedule. They just kind of pee when the pressure gets sufficient enough. It doesn't mean that you don't start trying to get them on a "routine", it just means that you have to accept that for a few weeks, they're not going to pick up the routine.
If your puppy is not actively in playing, eating, or sleeping, it is getting ready to get actively involved in peeing or pooping. You have to watch him like a hawk for the next week or so and the moment he stops doing one of the first three activities, it's out the door. Don't expect him to tell you he needs to go out for quite some time, you get him out the door.
I have many, many, times used the out the door and back in to get them "primed" I know they're going to pee just a few minutes after we get in the house, so I prepare for it, and then it's right back out the door to actually pee outside.
They pick it up quick, I promise. Over the next week or two the incidents will diminish, but you just have to kind of "program it into them".
Two weeks of hyper vigilance on your part and you'll most likely be done.
Good luck ansd congrat's on your new puppy. You have lots of fun in store coming up.
 

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Plus you need to keep in mind, most young (if not all) puppies don’t empty their bladder all at once. They will go a little bit, and then something else catches their attention. A couple of minutes later, they need to go again.
I hang outside with mine until they potty two, or three times. For the first 2-3 weeks, it feels like I spend more time with them outside, than inside.
 

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Consider my following response as an investment. Not a sacrifice.

During the day: Until the pup is 12 weeks old, take him out every 45 minutes... FAITHFULLY! Doesn't matter how well you think he "might" be able to "hold it". 12 to 16 weeks, take him out rather faithfully every 45 minutes to an hour... and begin to extend to the hour or after, as he approaches 16 weeks.

Additionally (or plan around the above state times), during the day, take him out immediately after every meal, nap and play session.

During the night: 8-12 weeks, initially take hime out every 45 minutes to an hour. Regardless if he is sleeping. If all goes well, 12-16 weeks, take him out every couple hours.

Each and every time he does his business outside, he gets high praise! If he pees three times on one trip out, high praise for each!

If he has an accident in the house, ignore it like it never happened. You have ZERO reaction. Calmly get him outside. When cleaning it up, do your best to have him sequestered away from the cleanup action.

This is the schedule I followed for "Aly", without fail.

My girl, Aly, is now 11 months old. I picked her up from the breeder, the day she turned 8 weeks old. Within the first 10 days of having her, she had three "tinkle" accidents in the house... all while in a highly excited state of play. Other than that. She has had ZERO accidents in the house.

Yup! It's an inconvenience, if YOU mentally categorize it as such. Yup, it's tiring! Give your lil guy the two months... and the next 11 to 14 years, he'll return the favor... many, many times over. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Consider my following response as an investment. Not a sacrifice.

During the day: Until the pup is 12 weeks old, take him out every 45 minutes... FAITHFULLY! Doesn't matter how well you think he "might" be able to "hold it". 12 to 16 weeks, take him out rather faithfully every 45 minutes to an hour... and begin to extend to the hour or after, as he approaches 16 weeks.

Additionally (or plan around the above state times), during the day, take him out immediately after every meal, nap and play session.

During the night: 8-12 weeks, initially take hime out every 45 minutes to an hour. Regardless if he is sleeping. If all goes well, 12-16 weeks, take him out every couple hours.

Each and every time he does his business outside, he gets high praise! If he pees three times on one trip out, high praise for each!

If he has an accident in the house, ignore it like it never happened. You have ZERO reaction. Calmly get him outside. When cleaning it up, do your best to have him sequestered away from the cleanup action.

This is the schedule I followed for "Aly", without fail.

My girl, Aly, is now 11 months old. I picked her up from the breeder, the day she turned 8 weeks old. Within the first 10 days of having her, she had three "tinkle" accidents in the house... all while in a highly excited state of play. Other than that. She has had ZERO accidents in the house.

Yup! It's an inconvenience, if YOU mentally categorize it as such. Yup, it's tiring! Give your lil guy the two months... and the next 11 to 14 years, he'll return the favor... many, many times over. ;-)
Thank you so much for the reply. We do however take him out every 15-20 min. Sometimes he pees 2 times outside, we praise for every time, we come inside, and he pees immediately inside. Today i could tell he was about to pee, I went to grab him, he bolted and peed in kitchen. Other times if I turn my back for a second he will just pee (after being outside for 40 minutes). Besides this he is doing great. Is this normal behavior?
 

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Thank you so much for the reply. We do however take him out every 15-20 min. Sometimes he pees 2 times outside, we praise for every time, we come inside, and he pees immediately inside. Today i could tell he was about to pee, I went to grab him, he bolted and peed in kitchen. Other times if I turn my back for a second he will just pee (after being outside for 40 minutes). Besides this he is doing great. Is this normal behavior?
Keep in mind, an 8 week old puppy has the attention span of a knat and simply has no control over their bladder. Additionally, each are very unique and individualized lil creatures.

Peeing when they have to (no matter where they are) and running away when they are chased (because it's fun) are two very instinctual behaviors. Environmentally, it is up to us to create a "normal" for them, through experiences.

Instead of trying to chase the lil guy if you see him begin to squat, try to make a loud noise to startle him (and stopping his immediate behavior). Some people say a loud clap. Personally, I used a high pitch screech (can be done when hands are full). I chose the screech because it was a very isolated stimulus. Clapping can also be used for praise and didn't want confusion in the future.

I could be wrong, but don't believe your lil guy is intellectually able to be acting in defiance when "... I turn my back for a second he will just pee...".

Your lil guy is going to change IMMENSELY over the next two weeks. His brain is currently developing at the greatest pace you'll ever witness. If you watch closely, you will literally see little behavioral changes between naps! Pretty amazing!

While I personally am not a big fan of allowing an 8 week old pup to sleep 7 hours at night, I'm by no means an authority on the subject. I had read too many times how a puppy "used to sleep through the nigh and now he doesn't". I just invested the time to create absolute consistency in Aly's daily life. Part of that consistency was being woken up and learning how to re-settle to continue sleeping again.

All of that said, it all comes down to "PPP"... "Practice", practice, practice the behavior you desire... "Praise" incessantly... and have "Patience", endlessly!

Oh... one other thing... When Aly was a tiny pup and I saw undesirable behaviors arise from no place, I used to fret! I'd try (time constrained due to a lil fur ball of energy) researching... and almost every time, as soon as I felt I had learned enough and began formulating a plan to correct the behavior, the undesirable behavior just vanished. My point? Don't fret over little behavioral things that may arise.

I have written a lot, mostly for naught. Almost all of your actions (except chasing) seem to be very appropriate! My bet, with your patience, you will very soon begin to see desired results.

Vizslas have only been bred for 1200 years to be your VERY CLOSE companion, to "work" (be trained) for you and TO PLEASE YOU. Yes, as pups, some consider them to be challenging. Keep with a solid, consistent, and understandable (to the pup) plan and you'll have an absolutely amazing addition to your family!!

Good luck!! The lil guy will only be a pup, ONCE! Do you best to enjoy every part of it (even the frustrating times)!:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Keep in mind, an 8 week old puppy has the attention span of a knat and simply has no control over their bladder. Additionally, each are very unique and individualized lil creatures.

Peeing when they have to (no matter where they are) and running away when they are chased (because it's fun) are two very instinctual behaviors. Environmentally, it is up to us to create a "normal" for them, through experiences.

Instead of trying to chase the lil guy if you see him begin to squat, try to make a loud noise to startle him (and stopping his immediate behavior). Some people say a loud clap. Personally, I used a high pitch screech (can be done when hands are full). I chose the screech because it was a very isolated stimulus. Clapping can also be used for praise and didn't want confusion in the future.

I could be wrong, but don't believe your lil guy is intellectually able to be acting in defiance when "... I turn my back for a second he will just pee...".

Your lil guy is going to change IMMENSELY over the next two weeks. His brain is currently developing at the greatest pace you'll ever witness. If you watch closely, you will literally see little behavioral changes between naps! Pretty amazing!

While I personally am not a big fan of allowing an 8 week old pup to sleep 7 hours at night, I'm by no means an authority on the subject. I had read too many times how a puppy "used to sleep through the nigh and now he doesn't". I just invested the time to create absolute consistency in Aly's daily life. Part of that consistency was being woken up and learning how to re-settle to continue sleeping again.

All of that said, it all comes down to "PPP"... "Practice", practice, practice the behavior you desire... "Praise" incessantly... and have "Patience", endlessly!

Oh... one other thing... When Aly was a tiny pup and I saw undesirable behaviors arise from no place, I used to fret! I'd try (time constrained due to a lil fur ball of energy) researching... and almost every time, as soon as I felt I had learned enough and began formulating a plan to correct the behavior, the undesirable behavior just vanished. My point? Don't fret over little behavioral things that may arise.

I have written a lot, mostly for naught. Almost all of your actions (except chasing) seem to be very appropriate! My bet, with your patience, you will very soon begin to see desired results.

Vizslas have only been bred for 1200 years to be your VERY CLOSE companion, to "work" (be trained) for you and TO PLEASE YOU. Yes, as pups, some consider them to be challenging. Keep with a solid, consistent, and understandable (to the pup) plan and you'll have an absolutely amazing addition to your family!!

Good luck!! The lil guy will only be a pup, ONCE! Do you best to enjoy every part of it (even the frustrating times)!:)
Hey derwos I can’t explain how much that reply means and how helpful it is. I think I feel like I did after my first baby- a dark tunnel that will never end. I didn’t enjoy his baby stage as much bc it felt like it will be forever. Then my second, third, and fourth babies I knew everything were stages and I enjoyed every minute. Your post reminded me that I am not in a dark tunnel, rocky is changing daily, and one day I will miss my puppy snuggles.
I’m glad you mentioned that about going 7 hours as a little pup at night. Had no idea that could be negative. And he is great at settling himself after waking up, so we could add that in easy. (I’m up nursing a baby anyways ha!)
He really has been great and is doing so well. Just the pee thing that makes me think I have to constantly watch him, which I DO. Just like I watch my babies constantly when I they are young.
I remember before getting a puppy I would roll my eyes (inside) at people without children who said a puppy is like a baby. But now I’m like wow I am humbled they are RIGHT haha!
but when I really think about it if pee is my only problem I am thankful. Heis so great with my kids. It’s crazy, the smaller the kid The gentler he is. He definitely has the sharkies but only when being played with. He’s a good pup.
Thanks again so much for the help and taking the time to write that.
 

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Hey derwos I can’t explain how much that reply means and how helpful it is. I think I feel like I did after my first baby- a dark tunnel that will never end. I didn’t enjoy his baby stage as much bc it felt like it will be forever. Then my second, third, and fourth babies I knew everything were stages and I enjoyed every minute. Your post reminded me that I am not in a dark tunnel, rocky is changing daily, and one day I will miss my puppy snuggles.
I’m glad you mentioned that about going 7 hours as a little pup at night. Had no idea that could be negative. And he is great at settling himself after waking up, so we could add that in easy. (I’m up nursing a baby anyways ha!)
He really has been great and is doing so well. Just the pee thing that makes me think I have to constantly watch him, which I DO. Just like I watch my babies constantly when I they are young.
I remember before getting a puppy I would roll my eyes (inside) at people without children who said a puppy is like a baby. But now I’m like wow I am humbled they are RIGHT haha!
but when I really think about it if pee is my only problem I am thankful. Heis so great with my kids. It’s crazy, the smaller the kid The gentler he is. He definitely has the sharkies but only when being played with. He’s a good pup.
Thanks again so much for the help and taking the time to write that.
@beccamomoffour
You don't have to look far, to find from mother's who have also raise vizsla pups, they can require more effort that a toddler.:oops:

With respect to an 8 week old puppy sleeping 7 hours thru the night... Please don't accept my explanation as being "right" and allowing the pup to sleep that long (at that age), is "wrong". My approach to raising Aly was that she could do no wrong... and anything she did wrong was my fault. In my view, leaving an 8 week old pup in a crate for 7 hours is asking for failure and setting the puppy up to fail. Personally, I was willing to sacrifice my sleep for a couple months to give Aly every chance to be successful.

It's cool you mention, the smaller the child, the more gentle the pup is. Aly was/is the very same way!!!

... and... YUP... the pee thing (among others) requires CONSTANT eyes on the lil guy. Funny thing about a vizsla though, before you realize it, you will no longer be keeping your eyes on the pup. The pup will be keeping his eyes on you!!! You won't have to wonder where he is because he'll always want to be in the same room as you. Come back and tell us about your privacy (or, there lack of) in the bathroom, in a few months.😂🤣

Now... I just want to prepare you for the next difficult stage you'll soon be encountering... "SHARKIES"!

Vizsla pups tend to be very mouthy and bitey until around 6 months old (for some v-pups, this cannot be overstated). For most people, this is a very trying time. I encourage you to do searches on this forum, for the term "sharkies". Try to begin to academically prepare yourself. Your patience will be tested. The way to constructively get through it is to distract them by putting things in their mouth they're allowed to chew on. I've posted elsewhere here, I bought every size, texture and geometry of toys and edible chews and always had some in my pockets or laying close, so I could immediately replace the biting of me with something else. Is it fool proof? Nope. You and the kids may find scratches and even some ouchie blood. Because I knew Aly would outgrow the behavior, I chose to use very little correction... and the only correction used was to say "nah-nah" and remove my bitable parts from her reach. Made as little issue of it, to her, as possible. The Sharkie stage left Aly really young. I just looked at the diary... she was 4.5 months old and sharkies vanished over a couple days.

Ohh... another thing about the "sharkies"... for us being bitten, it's natural for us to yank our hands away. Well... that yank away triggers the pup's instinctual "prey drive" and makes wanting to chase and bite more vigorously. Ya just gotta do your best to calmly remove your own flesh and replace with one of the above mentioned distraction items.

THE MOST IMPORTANT thing to keep is mind is that it's JUST A STAGE. It will pass! Yup... at times it's hard to keep your cool... but is best to do so!!! Today, at 11 months old, Aly has the most gentle mouth I've ever had in a dog.

Patience, Smile, Patience, Smile, Patience, Smile, Patience and Smile! LOL It's all an investment to an amazing creature, which you won't regret once ya get through it!
 
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