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So we've had our V from 7 weeks old - coming up to 19 weeks now, I would say he settled in to his new surroundings quite quickly. Brief background - settles in his crate through the night no crying, toilet trained, basic training sit, stay etc, love to retrieve a ball, happy to go in car etc

Only thing is he's always been quite vocal, and after a walk or play he'd come back in and start this barking and then running up behind and jumping and nipping, this started with my wife around 5 weeks ago, he didn't do it to me, It's just in the last two weeks we've noticed this alot more and is now doing it to me. We have been trying to preempt it as we can usually tell when it's going to happen so weve been redirecting his energy to his toys, treats etc which does seem to work but he has now taken to chewing anything he shouldnt, mounting his bed etc so we are now redirecting that to toys...it just seems we are constantly babysitting his naughtiness and not really enjoying him until about 9pm when he crashes out.

Obviously we adore him and love playing with him and walking him 3 times a day but whatever we do we can't seem to burn him out and it does become exhausting and unrewarding.

Is this just part of his puppy stage and finding his feet?

Is it because he has started teething?

It's almost as if he's bored but it's not like we don't do anything with him, I think we are doing enough walking for his bone development probably more than recommended but I think the recommendation is very cautious, then the playing is pretty constant because if your not distracting him he's trying to destroy is bed or anything he shouldnt, he has a wide range of toys and often does find the treat which he seems to love but will just go straight back to being "naughty" after 2 mins with his toy or treat.

Also to add he tends to be alot worse when we are outside with him for long periods, the barking at us if we say No or sometimes when we play that's when he will come up behind and bite on the legs if we start to walk away.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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The behavior is normal. It's very undesirable, but normal. Female dogs will also do it, so it isn't just a "boy thing".
At 5 months old he is very much ready for some "negative correction". He has his full adult brain and is more than capable of understanding the correction. He is also probably about 75% of his adult size, so you really want to get after him for the coming up behind you issue. The bed and pillow humping is something you're just going to have to keep after him about. This is very much normal for a dog that is beginning to feel the effects of hormones. Using you as practice to bring down prey, needs to stop though. And that is exactly what he is doing.
You need to "set him up" for the scenario where he comes up behind you and bites/nips. The moment, and I mean the exact moment he begins, you need to "bring down hades on him".
You're not going to beat him, smack him, grab him, try to flip him, try to dominate him, or anything else like that. You spin as fast as you can and using a big, loud, commanding, firm correcting, voice, yell NO!!. You take a big step toward him and make him back away. Don't use your hands and point a finger at him. Use your whole body. You have to "break his feet", which means to make him yield and back up a step. Once you've broken his feet, take one more step to make him back out of the space he is occupying, and you occupy it. Continue to vocally correct him for a few more seconds, then stop. You now change your energy, call him to you, put him on a leash, and do a few minutes of ground manner training so that you can finish on a positive note.
You're going to feel really awful when you do this, if it's been all soft and gentle to this point, but you have to do it. You have to be "the one in charge". I don't like the term "Alpha", but that's what it is. You have to make his decisions for him.
When animals correct each other, it is very quick, aggressive, threatening, and very loud. It doesn't continue on, it stops as soon as the expected response is achieved. This is how they "talk".
You can move a horse in a pasture from the gate with just body language, and emotional energy. The same thing can be done with a dog. Animals understand this. Animals don't intentionally "beat on each other" to communicate, which is why it does nothing to keep verbally berating/beating a dog, or horse for that matter., nor do they correct after the fact.They don't understand it, and they will quicly learn to distrust, and avoid you.

He is right now in the stages of getting his adult teeth, so he may be experiencing discomfort, which is adding to the bad behavior. I like to give dogs ice cubes and wet, frozen rags to chew on. It seems to help alleviate the discomfort for them. Give that a try.
 

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Gunnr is right on. It might help also if you have a place where he can be off-lead, to just run, in addition to the walks you give him. He sounds like he needs to expend more energy. Would be nice if you could find another pup around his age to run with & goof-off for awhile. The more exercise they get during the day, the better behaved in the evening we found.
 

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Wow its great to know I am not the only one who is experiencing this as well, our Tui is a nearly 5 month old bitch that is doing the jumping up from behind and nipping as well. I will certainly follow your advice Gunnr thanks !
 
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