Near-extinction after World War II - Hungarian Vizsla Forums
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Old 11-18-2019, 04:21 PM Thread Starter
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Near-extinction after World War II

Hi All -

Does anyone know the history of the breed well enough to explain how the it was near-extinction after World War II? I see this reference a lot and I'm just curious about it. Thanks in advance!
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Old 11-18-2019, 04:24 PM
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Hi All -



Does anyone know the history of the breed well enough to explain how the it was near-extinction after World War II? I see this reference a lot and I'm just curious about it. Thanks in advance!
It was near extinction due to the Nazi invasion .....anything they felt connected to Jewish heritage or non Aryan was to be erased for the master race so some Vizlas were smuggled out of Hungary to save the breed.

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Old 11-18-2019, 04:44 PM
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We often forget how close Europe itself was to "extinction" as a result of the carnage of WWII. The fact was people often could feed nor care for themselves and their human family, let alone their dogs.
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Old 11-18-2019, 08:40 PM
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Well, i grew up in the area and my family ended up being able to have a hunting vizsla which (along with my family) magically survived the banning of anything not communist rule and killing anything noble, whether it is people or their beautiful vizsla dogs...after the 1956 revolution it became even more brutal, sometimes people fleeing and bringing their pregnant vizslas with them having to kill the puppies as their was no way to make them survive safely.
Then as the new area developed their own `noble` level in the society (if u have ever read Orwell u can imagine what i mean) they also picked up hunting. Guess what they figured by the 1970s that they have no bird hunting dogs.... so the pendulum swung to the opposite and it became forbidden to export vizslas and a new phase of importing and breeding started.
Countries like Austria, US, UK, to name a few have helped immensely to save the breed in the dark ages between 50s and mid 70s.
I live now in the US and remain forever thankful to this country to recreate and help save something what i call my most Hungarian side and heritage.
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Old 11-19-2019, 10:27 AM Thread Starter
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Well, i grew up in the area and my family ended up being able to have a hunting vizsla which (along with my family) magically survived the banning of anything not communist rule and killing anything noble, whether it is people or their beautiful vizsla dogs...after the 1956 revolution it became even more brutal, sometimes people fleeing and bringing their pregnant vizslas with them having to kill the puppies as their was no way to make them survive safely.
Then as the new area developed their own `noble` level in the society (if u have ever read Orwell u can imagine what i mean) they also picked up hunting. Guess what they figured by the 1970s that they have no bird hunting dogs.... so the pendulum swung to the opposite and it became forbidden to export vizslas and a new phase of importing and breeding started.
Countries like Austria, US, UK, to name a few have helped immensely to save the breed in the dark ages between 50s and mid 70s.
I live now in the US and remain forever thankful to this country to recreate and help save something what i call my most Hungarian side and heritage.
Thank you for sharing your story. This explains it very well. I'm glad that you are in the US and able to enjoy something so important to your heritage in such a beautiful way. And that we can share it with you by enjoying these great dogs.
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Old 11-19-2019, 01:13 PM
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"The Vizsla" by B.C. Boggs has an excellent section on the history of the Vizsla. If I recall correctly, throughout both world wars, the Hungarian homeland of the vizsla was subject to occupation by invaders. The locals coveted the breed so much that they did not want invaders to have the dogs, many of the folks with breeding kennels left the region as refugees spreading out across different parts of Europe. Additionally, a number of dogs were also killed as a result of the conflict, and the stud books used by the breeders were hidden or destroyed. All of these factors made breeding post war difficult and contributed to the breeds near extinction.
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Old 11-21-2019, 11:08 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Gabica View Post
Well, i grew up in the area and my family ended up being able to have a hunting vizsla which (along with my family) magically survived the banning of anything not communist rule and killing anything noble, whether it is people or their beautiful vizsla dogs...after the 1956 revolution it became even more brutal, sometimes people fleeing and bringing their pregnant vizslas with them having to kill the puppies as their was no way to make them survive safely.
Then as the new area developed their own `noble` level in the society (if u have ever read Orwell u can imagine what i mean) they also picked up hunting. Guess what they figured by the 1970s that they have no bird hunting dogs.... so the pendulum swung to the opposite and it became forbidden to export vizslas and a new phase of importing and breeding started.
Countries like Austria, US, UK, to name a few have helped immensely to save the breed in the dark ages between 50s and mid 70s.
I live now in the US and remain forever thankful to this country to recreate and help save something what i call my most Hungarian side and heritage.
I'm happy that you are able to enjoy your heritage in such a great way... a living vibrant part of your culture. Everyone on this forum is enjoying it, too, and is grateful that we can. Long live the Vizsla! Thanks for sharing your story
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Old 11-21-2019, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DogLaw3 View Post
"The Vizsla" by B.C. Boggs has an excellent section on the history of the Vizsla. If I recall correctly, throughout both world wars, the Hungarian homeland of the vizsla was subject to occupation by invaders. The locals coveted the breed so much that they did not want invaders to have the dogs, many of the folks with breeding kennels left the region as refugees spreading out across different parts of Europe. Additionally, a number of dogs were also killed as a result of the conflict, and the stud books used by the breeders were hidden or destroyed. All of these factors made breeding post war difficult and contributed to the breeds near extinction.
Wow, sounds like I need to pick up that book to learn more about this great breed. I'd understand the history better and maybe get some insights into my wonderful pup
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