Do Vizsla pups ever settle? - Hungarian Vizsla Forums
 9Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 05-27-2018, 05:16 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 27
Do Vizsla pups ever settle?

We have a vibrant, independent, mischievous, confident, stubborn and loving 7 month old Vizsla!
She is great 70% of the time with her training but we have no hope when she has the crazy eyes!
She is placid and beautiful when she is slightly tired before and after a nap, or cruising around the home. We have always wanted an energetic dog and are so happy with her.

She is very energetic, but rough, jumpy and mouthy all other times. We are noticing that she nips out of frustration, never in aggression. E.g
- will jump and gently nip hand if she is impatient for food
- is not allowed to greet someone if she’s not settled
- if she is playing and she over reacts to someone’s hand/foot nearby (person not engaged in playing)
- if she is on the couch and refuses to get “off”

We do not punish her, rather redirect her. But are worried this is a sign of future nips!

Will this behaviours settle as she matures around 2-3 years of age? Or is this a personality trait we will have for ever!

What was your v like as a puppy and how are they now as adults?
GracieGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 05-27-2018, 01:03 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,031
Yup, energetic.

Exercise? Off lead, lots of it. She sounds like she's not getting enough, and she sounds bored too. You're lucky she hasn't burned the house down!

The other thing is: crate time! When she gets really crazed, give her a toy and some crate time to chill. Lastly, I'm not sure where you got the idea of not "punishing" her...but you need to rethink this. There needs to be some correction when she misbehaves, otherwise she thinks her behaviors are OK. Even a stern "NO!" and ignoring her will suffice.
Gabica and dotmom like this.
gingerling is offline  
post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 05-27-2018, 08:25 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerling View Post
Yup, energetic.

Exercise? Off lead, lots of it. She sounds like she's not getting enough, and she sounds bored too. You're lucky she hasn't burned the house down!

The other thing is: crate time! When she gets really crazed, give her a toy and some crate time to chill. Lastly, I'm not sure where you got the idea of not "punishing" her...but you need to rethink this. There needs to be some correction when she misbehaves, otherwise she thinks her behaviors are OK. Even a stern "NO!" and ignoring her will suffice.


Yes of course we give A stern no and walk away however nothing else. She does stop, but doesn’t deter her in the first place! Doesn’t seem to be enough!

She gets off leash play with 1-2 dogs at a large oval, bush walks off leash and daily on leash walk. We definitely notice that she settles quicker after a big play with another dog. As for her impulsivity, will this settle with age?

She Is great in the house doesn’t destroy anything just enjoys playing with her toys which is great 🙂
GracieGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 05-30-2018, 12:06 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,031
Impulsivity? What are you referring to?
gingerling is offline  
post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 05-30-2018, 09:21 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerling View Post
Impulsivity? What are you referring to?
Her quick and seemingly unprovoked jumping/nipping.... lack of self control I suppose haha! She knows it’s wrong but excitement and poor control seems to be the issue?
GracieGirl is offline  
post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 05-30-2018, 03:39 PM
Administrator
 
texasred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 7,760
In pups, I call it a short attention span.

Older dogs impluse control. But that is only in the dogs, that someone has spent a considerable amount of time working with. Most of the time, the dogs are very smart, and they just have to give it a try.
Gabica likes this.

Not all those who wander are lost.

Life is just a leap of faith.
Spread your arms and hold your breath and always trust your cape.

Two things define you. Your patience when you have nothing, and your attitude when you have everything.
texasred is offline  
post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 05-30-2018, 11:32 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,031
Quote:
Originally Posted by GracieGirl View Post
Her quick and seemingly unprovoked jumping/nipping.... lack of self control I suppose haha! She knows it’s wrong but excitement and poor control seems to be the issue?
As quickly as they lose their animalness, I think it's also important to recall that they are still *gasp!* animals. So..and this is just me....using human traits to describe basic doggyness isn't helpful in understanding and resolving the issues. Dogs aren't "impulsive" in the human sense. Typically if your dog is behaving badly it's a training issue, they haven't learned what's expected. So, the jumping..that's a greeting btw..and the nipping..that's their way of communicating...results from instinct. That can be shaped and modified, but I think it's important to not over pathologize a basically normal canine behavior, even if you do not approve or like it. And, no, they usually don't "Outgrow" these behaviors..b/c they're basically normal for them. If anything, they tend to get worse. Hence, training!

There are a lot of techniques to address these behaviors, as well as training books, my favorite is "Mother Knows Best" by Carol Lea Benjamin, I highly recommend it.
Gabica likes this.
gingerling is offline  
post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 05-31-2018, 12:12 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 71
May I also add that this is an adolescent dog, puppy/maturing animal. Keep up with the training, be patient, use as few words as possible as a command and above all be consistent.
Betty is offline  
post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-02-2018, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 27
Thanks all very helpful. I suppose the only way I can effectely describe the bevahiour is through human talk! I understand completely that she is a dog 🙂

We will continue with training and see how she responds 🙂 we just want to ensure it’s not a sign of aggression in future!
GracieGirl is offline  
post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-02-2018, 11:54 PM
CSF
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 29
I don't know if you read my post titled "Teenager or something more"- but it seems like we might have a similar dogs. Piper is now 15 months old and is much better- but it took having someone that owns vizslas to show us how to let her know that her behavior was inappropriate. She had to wear a training collar and a leash around the house and yard for quite awhile- until some behaviors started to change. She still is a pushy dog- but so sweet too! Especially sweet once she has been off leash on a trail for about an hour or more!
BFrancs and GracieGirl like this.
CSF is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Hungarian Vizsla Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome