Pulling on leash - Page 2 - Hungarian Vizsla Forums
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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-28-2018, 02:02 AM
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Our pup is now 1 and all I can say is don’t use easy walk, halti, etc to ‘cheat’ your way to a nice leash walk. We got an easy walk and we’re like this is awesome! For like a month and then he figured it out and can pull harder than a regular collar and we wasted all that time not training our dog.

We are still working on it, mainly that first part of the walk after being alone or as we approach his favorite swimming spot are rough.

What we do is when he pulls we stop, tell him sit, pause a second, walk past him then say ok for him to follow. When this doesn’t work and he ‘half sits’ or goes before we pass him we turn around and walk the opposite direction. The turning around works exceptionally well for us when he is pulling at something interesting because we walk away from his reward every time he pulls. For the start of the walk jitters the longer pause after a sit command is more helpful, sometimes we even do a paw or a jump trick to get him to snap out of his frenzy and focus on you again.

Like I said we are still working on it so someone may have more experience or a better way but it’s helped us make a lot of progress towards a peaceful walk.
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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-28-2018, 09:44 AM
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Lot's of good replies here. I would only add that training time is necessary and should not be when you decide to go for a walk or just be prepared for a lot of frustration. You should make specific times where your intent is to teach commands and that should be as often in short intervals as possible. V's will heel very well. My V actually does much better off leash than on leash. Finally, e collars are worth their weight in gold. I rarely correct with it anymore because when it is on, which is every time we go for a walk, he knows he must behave. He does good without it but is even better with it. Think of it as a very long leash, he will learn no matter where you are, he must obey you.
This has been my experience, too. My V is now 7 months, and he used to pull so badly on the leash that he would be practically crawling on the ground to get any traction. He was choking himself, and I was in danger of dislocating my shoulder and losing my grip. The various harnesses didn't make any difference; he quickly lost interest in earning prized treats and toys, and the start-stop and turn around methods just left us both frustrated and still needing an outlet for pent-up energy. Yes, he still got plenty of off-leash time in a fenced-in area, but that made the leash training even harder. With the introduction of e-collar training (2 months ago), we are both in a better, happier, and safer place. I don't have to correct him much at all when on his leash (or off). He will still pull a little on occasion (such as when people stop to pet him or he really wants something), but he is a 100 times better now than before. As Skillingsworth observed, mine heels really well (I was surprised at how easy that was for him!) and tends to mind even better off leash. When he is wearing his e-collar, I am able to hike with him off leash with confidence. He constantly stops and "checks on me" every 20 feet or so, but he did that naturally without any command or training, and I always give him lots of praise when he does it. I am constantly working on recall and sit/stay commands at a distance, but I rarely have to use any correction. He seems to know that being off leash on our hikes is a privileged and doesn't want to ruin it.

Just remember that no singular method of training is best for all people and all dogs. I have used a variety of methods with mine depending on what he responded to best and in what situations. Use of an e-collar has been a great supplement to our training, so it may be worth checking out as another option.
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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-23-2018, 11:19 AM
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I just recently introduced Ryker to the E-Collar. We spent his first 6 months learning commands so I was confident that he knew what I was asking for. The very first evening that I put the E-Collar on him we a lot of time stating at zero and working up to minimum stimulation. I got to 10 out of 127, and within a few days of regular training sessions he is a different dog, he is very sensitive to it, and just to put it in perspective 10 feels about half of a 9v battery on your tongue. I only need to push the vibrate button as a reminder now after a few weeks and he snaps to the commands. It is a great training tool when used properly, but please educate yourself before using, there are many great instructional videos available.
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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-24-2018, 07:30 PM
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That suitcase technique is a pain in the @$$ to deal with. It stops the dog dead in his/her tracks when they pull and you have to manually loosen it. It may work for some people depending on the body shape of the dog. Maybe a wider more round animal? With a narrow V I found it more challenging than helpful. It rubbed against his man parts too much to walk with more than a block. Also, your dog will pee all over your leash which is gross unless you like holding pee soaked leashes

Much better options to train loose leash walking IMO

You can easily judge the character of a person by how they treat those who can do nothing for them

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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-24-2018, 08:02 PM
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I've never had to manually loosen it.
As soon as the pressure is off, it should automatically go back to being loose again.

Not all those who wander are lost.

Life is just a leap of faith.
Spread your arms and hold your breath and always trust your cape.

Two things define you. Your patience when you have nothing, and your attitude when you have everything.
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-28-2018, 11:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonLP View Post
That suitcase technique is a pain in the @$$ to deal with. It stops the dog dead in his/her tracks when they pull and you have to manually loosen it. It may work for some people depending on the body shape of the dog. Maybe a wider more round animal? With a narrow V I found it more challenging than helpful. It rubbed against his man parts too much to walk with more than a block. Also, your dog will pee all over your leash which is gross unless you like holding pee soaked leashes [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.vizslaforums.com/images/VizslaForums_toucan/smilies/tango_face_devil.png[/IMG]

Much better options to train loose leash walking IMO
We have been using this technique for the last couple of months to walk Breeze as it is pretty much the only way for my shoulder to stay in its socket. "Stops them dead in their track"??? I wish that was the case. With the leash wrapped around her midsection, if she does want to go somewhere, she will pull so much that the leash is as tight as possible and i can't make it tighter. And if she sees a rabbit or a gopher, all bets are off. For us, after trying everything, this is the only thing we have found to make the walks manageable.
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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-29-2018, 08:41 PM
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Really..the best way of getting them to walk civilly on lead is to just stop when they pull. No muss, no fuss...no high tech gadgets that utilize pain..just..patience.

You a have a high performance dog, they require fine tuning. You cannot take short cuts, take the time to train them and in a week or two, they've got it. But if you expect them to just do it b/c you're on Main Street and need them to, then you're bound for frustration.
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-03-2018, 12:19 AM
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My 4 month old pulls a lot when gets very excited as he sees other dogs and people. He is such a social butterfly. Tonight, I put on the Gentle Leader (mouth harness) on him and he magically stopped pulling. He walked on my side heeling constantly and never pulled. At one point during our walk halfway, I switched the leash from the mouth harness to his collar and he immediately started pulling constantly over and over. After 5 minutes, I switched back to the mouth harness and he went back to heeling and being submissive and stopped pulling. Now, I have to research on how to wean him from the mouth harness to a regular collar.... lol
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